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Also Known As: Henry Graham Greene, Henry Greene Died: April 3, 1991
Born: October 2, 1904 Cause of Death: Leukemia
Birth Place: Hertfordshire, England, GB Profession: novelist, screenwriter, playwright, film critic

Biography CLOSE THE FULL BIOGRAPHY

A distinguished English novelist whose works were adapted into numerous acclaimed films, Graham Greene divided his books into what he labeled "entertainments" - psychological thrillers involving intrigue and espionage - and "novels," which often dealt with larger moral, religious or political themes. After his early years as a journalist, Greene commenced his writing career with The Man Within (1929) and was introduced to Hollywood when Stamboul Train (1932) was adapted into "Orient Train" (1934). He found his first success as a novelist and on screen when A Gun for Sale (1936) was made into the iconic Alan Ladd film noir "This Gun for Hire" (1942) and Brighton Rock (1938) propelled Richard Attenborough's career with a 1947 feature of the same name. Meanwhile, "The Third Man" (1949) starring Joseph Cotten and Orson Welles and adapted from his 1949 novel, lived on as one of the greatest film noirs ever made. In his later years, Greene's politics became highly critical of American imperialism and led to The Quiet American (1955), which foreshadowed the United States' involvement in Vietnam, and was turned into exemplary films in 1958 and 2002. Though largely dissatisfied with filmed versions of his...

A distinguished English novelist whose works were adapted into numerous acclaimed films, Graham Greene divided his books into what he labeled "entertainments" - psychological thrillers involving intrigue and espionage - and "novels," which often dealt with larger moral, religious or political themes. After his early years as a journalist, Greene commenced his writing career with The Man Within (1929) and was introduced to Hollywood when Stamboul Train (1932) was adapted into "Orient Train" (1934). He found his first success as a novelist and on screen when A Gun for Sale (1936) was made into the iconic Alan Ladd film noir "This Gun for Hire" (1942) and Brighton Rock (1938) propelled Richard Attenborough's career with a 1947 feature of the same name. Meanwhile, "The Third Man" (1949) starring Joseph Cotten and Orson Welles and adapted from his 1949 novel, lived on as one of the greatest film noirs ever made. In his later years, Greene's politics became highly critical of American imperialism and led to The Quiet American (1955), which foreshadowed the United States' involvement in Vietnam, and was turned into exemplary films in 1958 and 2002. Though largely dissatisfied with filmed versions of his work, Greene nonetheless saw adaptations of "The End of the Affair" (1955), "Our Man in Havana" (1960), "Travels with My Aunt" (1972) and "The Tenth Man" (1988). Though he was haunted by the demons of alcoholism, bipolar disorder and sexual obsession, Greene's worked assured his place as one of the 20th century's most accomplished authors.

VIEW THE FULL BIOGRAPHY

Filmographyclose complete filmography

CAST: (feature film)

1.
 Day for Night (1973) The English Insurance Broker
VIEW THE FULL FILMOGRAPHY

Milestones close milestones

:
Suffered a nervous collapse while at Berkhamsted School as a result of persecution by two classmates
1925:
Worked at the <i>Nottingham Journal</i>
1926:
Converted to Catholicism from Anglicanism (February)
1926:
Worked as copy editor at the London <i>Times</i>
:
Wrote first novel "The Man Within" (1929) while working at the <i>Times</i>
:
Left the <i>Times</i> to become film critic , first for periodical, <i>Night and Day</i> and later for <i>The Spectator</i>; began writing "entertainments" during this period
1937:
First screenplay, "21 Days" (filmed 1937; release delayed until 1940)
:
Worked for the British Ministry of Information during WWII
1941:
Assigned to work in Sierra Leone (December)
1943:
Returned to London; later transferred to Portugal where he reported to Kim Philby
1947:
Penned the script for "Brighton Rock", based on his novel
1949:
Wrote perhaps best-known film "The Third Man", adapted from his story; directed by Carol Reed
1954:
Worked as correspondent in Vietnam for <i>The New Republic</i>
1957:
Penned screenplay for Otto Preminger's "Saint Joan"
1960:
Reunited with Carol Reed for "Our Man in Havana"
1967:
Final film script, "The Comedians"
VIEW ALL MILESTONES

Education

Berkhamsted School: Berkhamsted , Hertfordshire -
Balliol College, Oxford University: - 1925

Notes

"The difference between an entertainment and a novel is about 20,000 words." --Graham Greene

"Mr. Greene was a superb storyteller with a gift for provoking controversy by writing topical novels in political settings. But many of his deepest concerns were spirtual: a soul working out its salvation or damnation amid the paradoxes and anomalies of 20th-century existence." --From The New York Times obituary, April 4, 1991.

"Mr. Greene's writer's appeal extended beyond readers concerned with good and evil to encompass those who like a good story. He had some of the narrative flair of Robert Louis Stevenson, to whom he was related. He had moreover, a talent for depicting local color, which he gathered at first hand; a keen sense of the dramatic; an ear for dialogue, and skill in pacing his prose." --From The New York Times obituary, April 4, 1991.

Named as a Companion of Honor by Queen Elizabeth II (1966)

Awarded Order of Merit from British government in 1986

Companions close complete companion listing

wife:
Vivien Dayrell-Browning. Born c. 1906; met in 1925; Greene converted to Catholicism because she had previously converted to the religion; married in October 1927; separated in 1948 but never divorced.
companion:
Anita Bjork. Actor. Swedish; had lengthy affair in the 1950s; resentment of relationship in cultural circles may have cost Greene the Nobel Prize.
companion:
Yvonne Cloetta. Dedicated last novel, "The Captain and the Enemy", to her.

Family close complete family listing

father:
Charles Henry Greene. Canon, teacher. Headmaster of Berkhamsted School which son attended; married his cousin.
mother:
Marion Raymond Greene. Cousin to husband; distantly related to Robert Louis Stevenson.
brother:
Hugh Greene. Radio executive. Served as Director General of the BBC.
brother:
Raymond Greene. Mountaineer.
daughter:
Lucy Caroline Greene. Born in December 1933; mother, Vivien Dayrell-Browning.
son:
Francis Greene. Born in September 1936; mother Vivien Dayrell-Browning; literary executor of his father's estate.
VIEW COMPLETE FAMILY LISTING

Bibliography close complete biography

"Babbling April" Blackwell
"The Man Within" Heinemann
"The Name of Action" Heinemann
"Rumor at Nightfall" Heinemann
"Stamboul Train" Heinemann
"Orient Express" Doubleday
"It's A Battlefield" Heinemann
"The Old School" Jonathan Cape
"England Made Me" Heinemann
"The Bear Fell Free" Grayson
"The Basement Room and Other Stories" Cressent Press
"Journey Without Maps" Heinemann
"A Gun For Sale" Heinemann
"Brighton Rock" Heinemann
"The Lawless Roads" Heinemann
"The Confidential Agent" Heinemann
"The Power and the Glory" Heinemann
"British Dramatists" William Collins and Sons
"The Ministry of Fear" Heinemann
"The Little Train" Eyre and Spottiswoode
"Nineteen Stories" Heinemann
"The Heart of the Matter" Heinemann
"Why Do I Write?" Percival Marshall
"The Third Man" Heinemann
"The Fallen Idol" Heinemann
"The Little Fire Engine" Parrish
"The Lost Childhood and Other Essays" Eyre and Spottiswoode
"The End of the Affair" Heinemann
"The Little Horse Bus" Parrish
"The Little Steamroller" Parrish
"The Living Room" Heinemann
"Essais Catholiques" Editions du Seuil
"Twenty-One Stories" Heinemann
"Loser Takes All" Heinemann
"The Quiet American" Heinemann
"The Spy's Bedside Handbook" Rupert Hart-Davis
"The Potting Shed" Heinemann
"Our Man in Havana" Heinemann
"The Complaisant Lover" Heinemann
"A Burnt-Out Case" Heinemann
"In Search of a Character: Two African Journals" Bodley Head
"A Sense of Reality" Bodley Head
"Carving a Statue" Bodley Head
"The Comedians" Bodley Head
"May We Borrow Your Husband? and Other Comedies of the Sexual Life" Bodley Head
"Collected Essays" Bodley Head
"Travels With My Aunt" Bodley Head
"A Sort of Life" Bodley Head
"Collected Stories" Heinemann
"The Pleasure Dome" Secker & Warburg
"Graham Greene on Film"
"The Honorary Consul" Bodley Head
"Lord Rochester's Monkey" Bodley Head
"An Impossible Woman: The Memories of Dottoressa Moor of Capri" Bodley Head
"The Return of A.J. Raffles" Bodley Head
"The Human Factor" Bodley Head
"Doctor Fischer of Geneva or the Bomb Party" Bodley Head
"Ways of Escape" Bodley Head
"The Great Jowett" Bodley Head
"J'Accuse: The Dark Side of Nice" Bodley Head
"Monsignor Quixote" Bodley Head
"Yes and No" Bodley Head
"For Whom the Bell Chimes" Bodley Head
"Getting to Know the General: The Story of an Involvement" Bodley Head
"Collected Plays" Penguin
"The Tenth Man" Bodley Head
"The Captain and the Enemy" Reinhardt Books
"Yours, etc.: Letters to the Press Reinhardt Books
"The Life of Graham Greene, Volume I: 1904-1939" Viking
"Reflections" Reinhardt Books
"The Last Word and Other Stories" Reinhardt Books
"A World of My Own" Reinhardt Books
"The Graham Greene Film Reader: Mornings in the Dark" Carcanet Press
"The Life of Graham Greene, Volume Two: 1939-1955" Viking
"The Quest for Graham Greene" St. Martin's Press
VIEW COMPLETE BIBLIOGRAPHY

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