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Michael Gordon

Michael Gordon

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Move Over,... She's Married to Him... He's Married to Her... and it's Sheer Bedlam from... more info $19.98was $19.98 Buy Now

Pillow Talk:... Rock Hudson and Doris Day light up the screen in the new 50th Anniversary... more info $14.98was $14.98 Buy Now

Portrait In... Portrait In BlackLana Turner and Anthony Quinn star as an adulterous couple who... more info $14.98was $14.98 Buy Now

Cyrano De... Jose Ferrer won an Oscar for his portrayal of the swashbuckling poet, afraid to... more info $6.98was $6.98 Buy Now

Boys' Night... Bowling? Nope. Another round of beers? Yawn. Three married men and their... more info $12.99was $19.99 Buy Now

The Impossible... Psychiatrist Jonathan Kingsley is an expert on the problems of the adolescent –... more info $12.99was $19.99 Buy Now

Also Known As: Died: April 29, 1993
Born: September 6, 1909 Cause of Death: natural causes
Birth Place: Baltimore, Maryland, USA Profession: Director ... director film editor actor drama professor dialogue director stage manager backstage technician
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BIOGRAPHY

Active with the Group Theater and such workers' filmmaking groups as Frontier Films during the 1930s and began in Hollywood as a dialogue director in 1940. Gordon's first films were insignificant B's, but he came into his own later in the decade with a series of taut melodramas and action pictures. "The Web" (1947) was a clever, strongly plotted film noir, "The Lady Gambles" (1949) gave Barbara Stanwyck a good emotional workout as a gambling addict, "Woman in Hiding" (1950) put Ida Lupino in edgy peril, and "I Can Get It for Your Wholesale" (1951) offered Susan Hayward a suitably aggressive showcase as a fashion entrepreneur.

Unfortunately, Gordon fell prey to the paranoia-driven blacklisting of the era and did not return to feature films until the end of the decade. When he did come back, it was with one of his most popular and well-remembered efforts, "Pillow Talk" (1959), starring Doris Day and Rock Hudson. Gordon followed this enjoyable sex farce with increasingly strained and derivative imitations, however, including "Boys' Night Out" (1962), "Move Over, Darling" (1963) and "A Very Special Favor" (1965). His career as a director petered out around 1970, but he later distinguished himself as a member of UCLA's theater arts faculty. The technical competence and smooth, intelligent control of Gordon's best films, though, made one wish that his professional peak had not been so abruptly interrupted.

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