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Steve Golin

Steve Golin

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Also Known As: Steven Golin Died:
Born: March 6, 1955 Cause of Death:
Birth Place: Profession: producer, line producer, photographer

Biography CLOSE THE FULL BIOGRAPHY

Former photographer turned producer who teamed up with Icelander Sigurjon 'Joni' Sighvatsson to found Propaganda Films, a small independent firm which gained a comfortable foothold in the entertainment industry by producing music videos and video-style commercials for TV. By 1990 Propaganda was producing about one out of every three music videos made in the United States, yielding revenues of about $20 million a year for the company. Golin and Sighvatsson played a key role in making stars of rock acts like Guns'n'Roses and have been much in demand by everyone from Bruce Springsteen to Prince.

Former photographer turned producer who teamed up with Icelander Sigurjon 'Joni' Sighvatsson to found Propaganda Films, a small independent firm which gained a comfortable foothold in the entertainment industry by producing music videos and video-style commercials for TV. By 1990 Propaganda was producing about one out of every three music videos made in the United States, yielding revenues of about $20 million a year for the company. Golin and Sighvatsson played a key role in making stars of rock acts like Guns'n'Roses and have been much in demand by everyone from Bruce Springsteen to Prince.

Filmographyclose complete filmography

CAST: (feature film)

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Milestones close milestones

:
Met Sigurjon 'Joni' Sighvatsson while studying at the AFI
1981:
Produced "The Penny Elf", starring Christopher Lloyd, while at the AFI
1983:
Served as line producer for the feature film, "Nickel Mountain" (on which Sighvatsson also worked)
:
Worked as an associate producer (along with Sighvatsson) on two low-budget features for the Patel/Shah Film Group, "Hard Rock Zombies" (1983) and "American Drive-In" (1985)
1985:
Co-founded (with Sighvatsson) Propaganda Films
:
Served as producer and executive producer on over 150 music videos and advertisements for performers such as Madonna, Janet Jackson, Don Henley, Prince, Guns'n'Roses and companies such as Nike, Pepsi, Coca-Cola and Reebok
1987:
Co-produced (with Sighvatsson) first feature film, "Private Investigations"
1988:
Co-produced (with Sighvatsson) first feature film for their Propaganda Films, "The Blue Iguana"
1990:
Co-executive produced TV-movie for TNT, "Heat Wave"
1999:
Served as one of the producers of "Being John Malkovich"
2004:
Executive Produced the Showtime drama "The L Word"
2004:
Produced second Charlie Kaufman film "Eternal Sunshine Of the Spotless Mind" starring Jim Carrey an Kate Winslet; film was nominated for a Golden Globe for Best Picture (Musical or Comedy)
2006:
Produced the ensemble drama, "Babel" directed and co-produced by Alejandro Gonzalez Inarritu; earned an Oscar nomination for Best Picture
VIEW ALL MILESTONES

Education

New York University: New York , New York -
AFI Conservatory: Los Angeles , California - 1981
Center For Advanced Film Studies, American Film Institute: - 1981 - 1983

Notes

Golin, on the successful approach Propaganda Films has taken in the entertainment business: "The only game plan we had when we started was to establish a business that was a positive cash flow business, that would give us the ability to be more flexible, to finance our own development on our own terms. The revenue from the video and commercial business is enough to let us survive and to give us a certain credibility with directors who don't want to take a project to a studio....We also like the music video business for other reasons, and that has to do with research and development. It's a great training ground for new talent. Music video takes only three days and costs maybe $150,000, so how big a disaster can it really be, even if you put somebody really inexperienced in there? We use video as a training ground, and if the people are good, then we move them into larger projects." ("New York Times", October 15, 1990)

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