skip navigation
Jerry Goldsmith

Jerry Goldsmith

Up
Down

| VIEW ALL

TCM Messageboards
Post your comments here
ADD YOUR COMMENT>

share:

TCM Archive Materials VIEW ALL ARCHIVES (0)

Recent DVDs

 
 

Jerry Goldsmith - NOT AVAILABLE

Find what your looking for faster use the search field below to shop for titles.

SEARCH TCM.COM/SHOP


OR ... Click here to VOTE > for this person to be released on Home Video



Also Known As: Jerrald Goldsmith, Jerrald Goldsmith Died: July 21, 2004
Born: February 10, 1929 Cause of Death: cancer
Birth Place: Los Angeles, California, USA Profession: composer, conductor, musician, producer, actor, clerk

Biography CLOSE THE FULL BIOGRAPHY

His scores for "Planet of the Apes" (1968), "The Omen" (1976), "Star Trek, the Motion Picture" (1979), "Alien" (1979), and "Poltergeist" (1982) made him the king of science fiction and horror movie music, but veteran film composer Jerry Goldsmith had more to offer than mere thrills and chills. A one-time student of acclaimed composer Miklós Rózsa, Goldsmith channeled his passion for classical composition into his work on such prestige pictures as "Lonely Are the Brave" (1962), "Lilies of the Field" (1963), and "Patton" (1970), the latter of which garnered him one of many Academy Award nominations for Best Original Score. During his journeyman years as an in-house composer for the Columbia Broadcasting System, Goldsmith was an indispensable component of such long-running television series as "Playhouse 90," "Dr. Kildare," "The Twilight Zone" and "The Man from U.N.C.L.E." but his stock in the film industry rose via his associations with such A-list directors as John Huston, Otto Preminger, John Sturges, and Franklin J. Schaffner. In the bell lap of his long and distinguished career, Goldsmith became the composer of choice for such new talents as Ridley Scott, Paul Verhoeven, Joe Dante and Curtis...

His scores for "Planet of the Apes" (1968), "The Omen" (1976), "Star Trek, the Motion Picture" (1979), "Alien" (1979), and "Poltergeist" (1982) made him the king of science fiction and horror movie music, but veteran film composer Jerry Goldsmith had more to offer than mere thrills and chills. A one-time student of acclaimed composer Miklós Rózsa, Goldsmith channeled his passion for classical composition into his work on such prestige pictures as "Lonely Are the Brave" (1962), "Lilies of the Field" (1963), and "Patton" (1970), the latter of which garnered him one of many Academy Award nominations for Best Original Score. During his journeyman years as an in-house composer for the Columbia Broadcasting System, Goldsmith was an indispensable component of such long-running television series as "Playhouse 90," "Dr. Kildare," "The Twilight Zone" and "The Man from U.N.C.L.E." but his stock in the film industry rose via his associations with such A-list directors as John Huston, Otto Preminger, John Sturges, and Franklin J. Schaffner. In the bell lap of his long and distinguished career, Goldsmith became the composer of choice for such new talents as Ridley Scott, Paul Verhoeven, Joe Dante and Curtis Hanson, while his scoring for the revived "Star Trek" franchise won him a new generation of followers. Cut down by cancer in 2004, Goldsmith had long since attained enshrinement as a top-flight Hollywood composer, able to bridge the distant past and the unforeseeable future with an infectious measure of wonder and optimism.

Jerrald King Goldsmith was born in Pasadena, CA on Feb. 10, 1929. He began studying piano at age six, and within five years, was a student of Polish concert pianist Jakob Gimpel. While studying with Mario Castelnuovo-Tedesco, a composer of film scores for Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer and mentor of future film composers Nelson Riddle, Henry Mancini and John Williams, Goldsmith attended an exhibition of Alfred Hitchcock's "Spellbound" (1945) and was inspired enough by Miklós Rózsa's score to devote himself to a career as a film composer. Goldsmith attended Rózsa's classes at the University of Southern California, but completed his musical education at the more downmarket Los Angeles City College, where he offset his tuition with work as an assistant conductor and opera coach. Upon hearing that the Columbia Broadcasting Company was offering employees free workshops in radio production, Goldsmith secured work as a script typist in the network's music department. Though his first job was slotting library cues into radio dramas, he was later allowed to compose original music for such programs as "CBS Radio Workshop" and "Frontier Gentleman."

Goldsmith contributed uncredited cues to the Marilyn Monroe vehicle "Don't Bother to Knock" (1952), but made his proper debut as a film composer with the low-budget western "Black Patch" (1957). Over the next decade, he toggled between screens big and small, providing accompaniment for such CBS weeklies as "Playhouse 90" (1956-1961), "Perry Mason" (1957-1966) and "Dr. Kildare" (1961-66). His wall-to-wall music for the nearly wordless "Twilight Zone" (1959-1964) episode "The Invaders" garnered great acclaim and he contributed an edgy opening title to the Boris Karloff-hosted omnibus "Thriller" (1961-62). Though his work in films began with such pinchpenny projects as "City of Fear" (1959) and "Face of a Fugitive" (1959), he enjoyed an uptake in status on several Kirk Douglas films, among them "Lonely are the Brave" (1962), "The List of Adrian Messenger" (1962), and "Seven Days in May" (1964). Over the ensuing years, Goldsmith forged important director-composer relationships with John Huston, John Frankenheimer, John Sturges and Otto Preminger.

The vogue for espionage dramas in the wake of Eon Productions' profitable James Bond franchise starring Sean Connery provided Goldsmith with fat feature and TV paychecks. He provided the staccato main title and episodic cues for the popular spy series "The Man from U.N.C.L.E." (NBC, 1964-68) and scored Twentieth Century Fox's tongue-in-cheek Bond spoofs "Our Man Flint" (1966) and "In Like Flint" (1967), starring James Coburn. In a more sober vein, Goldsmith scored John Frankenheimer's edgy science fiction thriller "Seconds" (1966) starring Rock Hudson in a change-of-pace role and provided nearly 90 minutes of original music for Robert Wise's historical adventure-drama "The Sand Pebbles" (1966), starring Steve McQueen as an American sailor caught up in the Chinese Boxer Rebellion. Goldsmith offered more subdued scores for the Sidney Poitier films "Lilies of the Field" (1963) and "A Patch of Blue" (1965) while partnering profitably with director Franklin J. Schaffner on "Planet of the Apes" (1968), "Patton" (1968), and "Papillon" (1973), all of which garnered him Academy Award nominations for Best Original Music.

By his forties, Goldsmith was short-listed as one of Hollywood's premier film composers, with the majority of his efforts aimed at the big screen. Scores for the Burt Reynolds private eye caper "Shamus" (1973), Roman Polanski's tony period whodunit "Chinatown" (1974), the Charles Bronson vehicles "Breakout" (1975) and "Breakheart Pass" (1975), and the John Milius' fact-based adventure "The Wind and the Lion" (1975) followed, while on the small screen he scored the acclaimed miniseries "QB VII" (1974) and episodes of "The Waltons" (CBS, 1971-1981) and "Police Story" (NBC, 1973-77). He returned to genre with "Logan's Run" (1976), "Damnation Alley" (1977), "The Swarm" (1978), and "Magic" (1978) and won his only Oscar for "The Omen" (1976). Goldsmith's score for Ridley Scott's "Alien" (1979) was branded an instant classic, eschewing lyrical themes for dissonant snippets that telegraphed the film's preoccupation with paranoia and doom. In the Eighties, Goldsmith's music box-inspired "Poltergeist" (1982) score was another crowd-pleaser, while his martial accompaniment for "First Blood" (1982) led to profitable assignments on "Rambo: First Blood Part II" (1983) and "Rambo III" (1988).

Sci-fi horror practitioner Joe Dante tapped Goldsmith for a number of his films, among them "Gremlins" (1984), "The 'Burbs" (1988), and "Matinee" (1993), while the composer adapted existing material for "Star Trek, The Motion Picture" (1979), "Psycho 2" (1983), and "Twilight Zone: The Movie" (1983). Oscar nominations followed for his work on "Hoosiers" (1986), "Basic Instinct" (1992), "LA Confidential" (1997), and Disney's "Mulan" (1999), but Goldsmith shockingly remained a one-time Academy honoree. He stuck with the "Star Trek" franchise through several sequels and continued his explorations into genre scoring with "Total Recall" (1990), "The Mummy" (1999), "The Haunting" (1999) and "Hollow Man" (2000). He also enjoyed a continued relationship with the actor Sean Connery, scoring "Outland" (1981), "The Russia House" (1990), and "First Knight" (1995). Additionally, Goldsmith served as a music producer and conductor and conducted his own music in venues around the world, often in partnership with the London Symphony Orchestra. His final credit was for Dante's "Looney Tunes: Back in Action" (2003), for which he received a Saturn Award nomination for Best Original Score. Diagnosed with lung cancer, Goldsmith struggled through a long term of treatment before he succumbed to the disease on July 21, 2004. Posthumously, his music was heard in such films as "Basic Instinct 2" (2006), "The Omen" (2006), "Rambo" (2008), "Scott Pilgrim vs. the World" (2012), "Prometheus" (2012), and "Django Unchained" (2012). Since 1998, Goldsmith's composition "Fanfare for Oscar" has been included in every annual presentation of the Academy Awards - a fitting tribute to one of the greatest, most diverse and prolific film composers of all time.

By Richard Harland Smith

VIEW THE FULL BIOGRAPHY

Filmographyclose complete filmography

CAST: (feature film)

1.
 Gremlins 2: The New Batch (1990) Yogurt Customer
2.
 AFI's 100 Years... 100 Thrills (2001) Interviewee
VIEW THE FULL FILMOGRAPHY

Milestones close milestones

:
Born and raised in the Los Angeles area
1954:
TV debut, provided music for the series, "Climax!"
1957:
Feature debut, credited for music, "Black Patch"
1958:
First feature as music conductor, also provided music, "City of Fear"
1959:
Scored episodes of the popular series, "The Twilight Zone"
1960:
First major film scoring opportunity, "Lonely Are the Brave"
1962:
Earned first Academy Award nomination for the score to John Huston's "Freud"
1963:
Initial collaboration with Franklin J Schaffner, "The Stripper"
1965:
Provided additional music for Carol Reed's, "The Agony and the Ecstasy"
1967:
TV series producing debut, "The Las Vegas Show"
1969:
Debut as concert conductor with his own cantata "Christus Apollo" (text by Ray Bradbury), performed by Southern California Chamber Society
1970:
Provided score for Academy Award-winning Best Picture "Patton"; third of seven collaborations with director Schaffner and second Academy Award nomination
1970:
TV-movie debut, music credit, "The Brotherhood of the Bell"
1973:
Picked up first Emmy for NBC movie "The Red Pony"
1974:
Earned Oscar nod for his atmospheric music for Roman Polanski's "Chinatown"
1976:
Composed Oscar-winning score for "The Omen"; also nominated for Best Song for "Avi Satani"
1979:
First association with "Star Trek"; provided the Oscar-nominated original score for "Star Trek: The Motion Picture"
1983:
Initial collaboration with Joe Dante, "It's a Good Life" episode of "Twilight Zone - The Movie"
1987:
Provided music for syndicated series "Star Trek: The Next Generation"
1987:
Seventh and final collaboration with Schaffner, "Lionheart"
1989:
Scored "Star Trek V: The Final Frontier"; also wrote song "The Moon's a Window to Heaven"
1990:
First on-screen appearance as a yogurt customer in Dante's "Gremlins 2: The New Batch"
1992:
Made first TV appearance as part of the special, "Disney's Young Musicians Symphony Orchestra"
1992:
Received 16th Oscar nomination for scoring "Basic Instinct"
1994:
Initial collaboration with director Curtis Hanson on "The River Wild"
1995:
Wrote theme for sydicated series "Star Trek: Voyager"
1996:
Continued on the mission with "Star Trek: First Contact"
1997:
Reteamed with Hanson for "L.A. Confidential"
1998:
Eighth collaboration with Dante, "Small Soldiers"
1998:
Composed "Fanfare for Oscar", a 45-second theme for the Academy Awards
VIEW ALL MILESTONES

Education

Dorsey High School: Los Angeles , California -
Los Angeles City College: Los Angeles , California -
University of California at Los Angeles: Los Angeles , California -
University of Southern California: Los Angeles , California -

Notes

Goldsmith received the Max Steiner Award for achievement in scoring and composing motion picture music from the National Film Society in 1982. Other honors include: the Richard Kirk Award, Broadcast Music, Inc (1987); the Golden Score Award, American Society of Music Arrangers (1990); an honorary Mus D degree, Berklee College of Music (1990) and a Career Achievement Award, Society for the Preservation of Film Music (1993).

In 1997, Goldsmith donated his original manuscripts to teh Margaret Herrick Library of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences

"He experimented a lot and that's what made him so popular with his fans," Carruth said. "When he wrote, he got inside of the characters and he wrote what he felt they were thinking and feeling."---Lois Carruth, his personal assistant to CNN.com, July 22, 2004.

Companions close complete companion listing

wife:
Carol Heather Sheinkopf. Married on July 23, 1972; mother of Goldsmith's youngest son.

Family close complete family listing

father:
Morris Goldsmith. Structural engineer.
mother:
Tessa Goldsmith. Artist.
daughter:
Ellen Goldsmith. From first marriage.
daughter:
Carrie Goldsmith. From first marriage.
son:
Joel Goldsmith. Composer, sound recordist. From first marriage; born on November 19, 1957; among his many credits, provided additional music for "Star Trek: First Contact" (1996), scored by father.
daughter:
Jennifer Goldsmith. From first marriage.
son:
Aaron Goldsmith. Mother, Carol Heather Sheinkopf.
VIEW COMPLETE FAMILY LISTING

Please support TCMDB by adding to this information.

Click here to contribute