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Ned Glass

Ned Glass

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Also Known As: Died: June 15, 1984
Born: April 1, 1906 Cause of Death:
Birth Place: Poland Profession: actor

Biography CLOSE THE FULL BIOGRAPHY

Ned Glass was a character actor most known for playing nebbishy, neurotic, or mischievous characters with a thick New York accent. In the 1930s, Glass worked mostly in vaudeville and on Broadway as both an actor and a director, until 1937 when his next-door neighbor Moe Howard of the Three Stooges offered him a small and uncredited role in a Three Stooges short film, "Nutty But Nice." Glass went on to take three more uncredited roles in three other Three Stooges films. He made his mark in 1950s television, mostly in variety shows and sitcoms, such as his many roles on "The Jackie Gleason Show," above all in the program's "The Honeymooners" sketches (precursors to Gleasonâ¿¿s sitcom "The Honeymooners"); and on "The Phil Silvers Show," with a recurring role as quartermaster Sergeant Pendleton. One of Glass's most notable film roles came in the Academy Award-winning musical "West Side Story," an updated New York City version of Shakespeareâ¿¿s "Romeo and Juliet." His character, Doc, an archetypical old-guard New Yorker who runs the local drugstore, served as a mentor and conscience to main character Tony; Glass delivered a memorably poignant and pivotal performance. In 1969, Glass was nominated for a...

Ned Glass was a character actor most known for playing nebbishy, neurotic, or mischievous characters with a thick New York accent. In the 1930s, Glass worked mostly in vaudeville and on Broadway as both an actor and a director, until 1937 when his next-door neighbor Moe Howard of the Three Stooges offered him a small and uncredited role in a Three Stooges short film, "Nutty But Nice." Glass went on to take three more uncredited roles in three other Three Stooges films. He made his mark in 1950s television, mostly in variety shows and sitcoms, such as his many roles on "The Jackie Gleason Show," above all in the program's "The Honeymooners" sketches (precursors to Gleasonâ¿¿s sitcom "The Honeymooners"); and on "The Phil Silvers Show," with a recurring role as quartermaster Sergeant Pendleton. One of Glass's most notable film roles came in the Academy Award-winning musical "West Side Story," an updated New York City version of Shakespeareâ¿¿s "Romeo and Juliet." His character, Doc, an archetypical old-guard New Yorker who runs the local drugstore, served as a mentor and conscience to main character Tony; Glass delivered a memorably poignant and pivotal performance. In 1969, Glass was nominated for a Primetime Emmy Award for his recurring supporting role as Sol Cooper, the widowed landlord to the title character on the sitcom "Julia," one of the first television series to feature an African American woman, Diahann Carroll, in a leading role.

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Filmographyclose complete filmography

CAST: (feature film)

1.
 Street Music (1982) Sam
2.
 Goldie and the Boxer (1979) Al Levinsky
3.
 Vega$ (1978) Charlie
4.
 Crossfire (1975) Bartender
5.
 Save the Tiger (1973)
6.
 All-American Boy, The (1973) Arty
7.
 Lady Sings the Blues (1972) The agent
8.
9.
 Mongo's Back in Town (1971) Freddie
10.
 Banyon (1971) Lou Moran
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Education

City College of New York: New York , New York -

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