skip navigation
Hermione Gingold

Hermione Gingold

Up
Down

| VIEW ALL

TCM Messageboards
Post your comments here
ADD YOUR COMMENT>

share:

TCM Archive Materials VIEW ALL ARCHIVES (1)

Also Known As: Died: May 24, 1987
Born: December 9, 1897 Cause of Death:
Birth Place: London, England, GB Profession: actor, comedian

Biography CLOSE THE FULL BIOGRAPHY

A justly beloved, somewhat bizarre-looking English character player, Hermione Gingold delighted millions with her typically haughty, imperious manner, a slight lisp in her voice and a richly fruity, theatrical line delivery. Gingold most often played middle-aged or elderly, whimsical eccentrics or self-righteous, gorgon-like "pillars" of the community. Though much of her lengthy, distinguished career was spent on the stage, Gingold did spread her legendary, hilarious magic through a number of films, including "Bell, Book and Candle" (1958), as one of a covens of amusing, dotty witches, and "The Music Man" (1962), as a commanding, small-town dragon of a matron who stages a human sculpture as an "Ode to a Grecian Urn." Gingold was ideal in Dickensian territory as part of the motley crew of eccentrics in the 1952 film adaptation of "The Pickwick Papers." By contrast, in "Gigi" (1958), she was warm, wise and witty as Leslie Caron's sympathetic, solicitous grandmother, joining Maurice Chevalier for an enchanting and moving duet on the perils and joys of human memory and the twilight of romance, "I Remember It Well." The unique Gingold was a splendid trouper on the stage well into her later years (as in...

A justly beloved, somewhat bizarre-looking English character player, Hermione Gingold delighted millions with her typically haughty, imperious manner, a slight lisp in her voice and a richly fruity, theatrical line delivery. Gingold most often played middle-aged or elderly, whimsical eccentrics or self-righteous, gorgon-like "pillars" of the community. Though much of her lengthy, distinguished career was spent on the stage, Gingold did spread her legendary, hilarious magic through a number of films, including "Bell, Book and Candle" (1958), as one of a covens of amusing, dotty witches, and "The Music Man" (1962), as a commanding, small-town dragon of a matron who stages a human sculpture as an "Ode to a Grecian Urn."

Gingold was ideal in Dickensian territory as part of the motley crew of eccentrics in the 1952 film adaptation of "The Pickwick Papers." By contrast, in "Gigi" (1958), she was warm, wise and witty as Leslie Caron's sympathetic, solicitous grandmother, joining Maurice Chevalier for an enchanting and moving duet on the perils and joys of human memory and the twilight of romance, "I Remember It Well." The unique Gingold was a splendid trouper on the stage well into her later years (as in Stephen Sondheim's marvelous "A Little Night Music" in the 70s), and her very occasional feature credits extend up until shortly before her death.

VIEW THE FULL BIOGRAPHY

Filmographyclose complete filmography

CAST: (feature film)

2.
 Garbo Talks (1984) Elizabeth Rennick
3.
 Little Night Music, A (1977) Mme Armfeldt
4.
 Banyon (1971) Peggy Revere
5.
 Those Fantastic Flying Fools (1967) Angelica, custodian of wayward girls' home
6.
 Munster, Go Home! (1966) Lady Effigie
7.
 Promise Her Anything (1966) Mrs. Luce
8.
 Harvey Middleman, Fireman (1965) Mrs. Koogleman
9.
 I'd Rather Be Rich (1964) Nurse Grimshaw
10.
 Gay Purr-ee (1962) Madame Rubens-Chatte
VIEW THE FULL FILMOGRAPHY

Please support TCMDB by adding to this information.

Click here to contribute