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Theodor S. Geisel

Theodor S. Geisel

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Also Known As: Theodor Geisel, Theodor Seuss Geisel, Dr. Seuss, Dr. Seuss Died: September 24, 1991
Born: March 2, 1904 Cause of Death: Throat Cancer
Birth Place: Springfield, Massachusetts, USA Profession:

Biography CLOSE THE FULL BIOGRAPHY

A wildly imaginative illustrator and author, Dr. Seuss is easily the most beloved figure in American children's literature. As a young man, he found success in advertising and eventually moved on to books, unveiling his kid-centric debut, And to Think That I Saw It on Mulberry Street, in 1937. His 1940 story, the elephant-starring tale Horton Hatches the Egg, became a "Merrie Melodies" (Warner Bros., 1931-1969) animated short two years later, marking the first of many times that his work would get translated to the screen. After World War II, Seuss tackled kid-oriented fare with verve, even releasing two of his most famous books, The Cat in the Hat and How the Grinch Stole Christmas! within months during 1957. The latter became a perennially popular 1966 animated TV special, and various Seuss adaptations followed, even as he continued to publish new stories. About a decade after Seuss' death in 1991, a number of big-budget feature-film versions of his books began to surface, leading to a revival of sorts, though his oddly clever narratives have never truly gone out of style.

A wildly imaginative illustrator and author, Dr. Seuss is easily the most beloved figure in American children's literature. As a young man, he found success in advertising and eventually moved on to books, unveiling his kid-centric debut, And to Think That I Saw It on Mulberry Street, in 1937. His 1940 story, the elephant-starring tale Horton Hatches the Egg, became a "Merrie Melodies" (Warner Bros., 1931-1969) animated short two years later, marking the first of many times that his work would get translated to the screen. After World War II, Seuss tackled kid-oriented fare with verve, even releasing two of his most famous books, The Cat in the Hat and How the Grinch Stole Christmas! within months during 1957. The latter became a perennially popular 1966 animated TV special, and various Seuss adaptations followed, even as he continued to publish new stories. About a decade after Seuss' death in 1991, a number of big-budget feature-film versions of his books began to surface, leading to a revival of sorts, though his oddly clever narratives have never truly gone out of style.

Filmographyclose complete filmography

CAST: (feature film)

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Milestones close milestones

1928:
Found national fame with his Flit advertisements
1937:
Published his debut book, <i>And to Think That I Saw It on Mulberry Street</i>
1942:
<i>Horton Hatches the Egg</i> became a "Merrie Melodies" cartoon short
1957:
Debuted both <i>The Cat in the Hat</i> and <i>How the Grinch Stole Christmas!</i>
1960:
Continued to simplify his style with <i>One Fish Two Fish Red Fish Blue Fish</i>
1960:
Published <i>Green Eggs and Ham</i>
1966:
TV special <i>How the Grinch Stole Christmas!</i> aired
1971:
<i>The Cat in the Hat</i> and <i>The Lorax</i> became television specials
1990:
Released <i>Oh, the Places You'll Go!</i> months before his death
1999:
Seuss Landing, a part of Universal's Islands of Adventure theme park opened in Orlando, Florida
2000:
"How the Grinch Stole Christmas," the first Seuss feature film debuted
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Education

Dartmouth College: - 1925
University of Oxford: -

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