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Janeane Garofalo

Janeane Garofalo

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Clay Pigeons DVD Joaquin Phoenix, Vince Vaughn and Janeane Garofolo star in "Clay Pigeons"... more info $14.98was $14.98 Buy Now

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Also Known As: Died:
Born: September 28, 1964 Cause of Death:
Birth Place: Newton, New Jersey, USA Profession: actor, comedian, producer, movie theater usher, shoe store clerk, receptionist at a health club, bike messenger, waitress

Biography CLOSE THE FULL BIOGRAPHY

Stand-up comedian and actress Janeane Garofalo was the poster child for dry and caustically witty women in film and television in the late 1980s and early 1990s. Her self-deprecating humor and hipster style endeared her to college age audiences, but as her fame grew, Garofalo found it uncomfortable - if not downright impossible - to work within the Hollywood system. She eventually retreated from the mainstream, settling into a variety of roles, including a radio host on the liberal Air America network, where her comments drew considerable fire from the conservative majority.Born Sept. 26, 1964 in Newton, NJ, Garofalo's parents both worked in the oil industry, which forced the family to relocate frequently during her adolescence. She developed an interest in comedy at an early age, drawing inspiration from "Late Night with David Letterman" (NBC, 1982-1993), which she hoped to write for one day. After graduating from high school in Katy, TX, she studied history at Providence College in Rhode Island. At that same time, she entered a comedy contest sponsored by the Showtime Network, where she surprisingly took top prize. After graduating from college, an invigorated Garofalo began making the rounds at...

Stand-up comedian and actress Janeane Garofalo was the poster child for dry and caustically witty women in film and television in the late 1980s and early 1990s. Her self-deprecating humor and hipster style endeared her to college age audiences, but as her fame grew, Garofalo found it uncomfortable - if not downright impossible - to work within the Hollywood system. She eventually retreated from the mainstream, settling into a variety of roles, including a radio host on the liberal Air America network, where her comments drew considerable fire from the conservative majority.

Born Sept. 26, 1964 in Newton, NJ, Garofalo's parents both worked in the oil industry, which forced the family to relocate frequently during her adolescence. She developed an interest in comedy at an early age, drawing inspiration from "Late Night with David Letterman" (NBC, 1982-1993), which she hoped to write for one day. After graduating from high school in Katy, TX, she studied history at Providence College in Rhode Island. At that same time, she entered a comedy contest sponsored by the Showtime Network, where she surprisingly took top prize. After graduating from college, an invigorated Garofalo began making the rounds at comedy clubs. Like many comics, her early years were challenging, so she frequently worked at odd jobs - including bicycle messenger and shoe salesman - to make ends meet between engagements.

Eventually, Garofalo's humor - cutting, dark, politically and socially savvy, refreshingly different from the typical "women's issues" female stand-ups - developed a following - enough that film and television began to beckon. She soon appeared on several TV comedy specials and marked her film debut with a small role in the obscure science fiction drama "Late for Dinner" (1991), by cult filmmaker W.D. Richter. In 1992, Garofalo joined the cast of "The Ben Stiller Show" (Fox, 1992-93), a hip and very funny sketch comedy series based around the parody skills of its star. Despite overwhelmingly positive reviews, the show was largely abandoned by its network, and fizzled after just 13 episodes. Stiller and Garofalo remained friends after the show's demise, working together on several projects, including a hardcover parody of self-help guides called Feel This Book.

Garofalo next jumped to "The Larry Sanders Show" (HBO, 1992-97), Garry Shandling's much-lauded comedy series about the behind-the-scenes workings at a long-running late night talk show. As Paula, Garofalo honed her sharp-tongued, fast-thinking Gal Friday persona, earning critical acclaim as well as two Emmy nominations in 1996 and 1997. For a brief stint during this period, Garofalo was a cast member on "Saturday Night Live" (NBC, 1975-) from 1994-95, but found the experience distasteful due to rancor between the writing staff and performers like herself and Jay Mohr, who hoped to bring their own comic abilities to the ailing program. Garofalo quit the show after a season, returning to regular appearances on "Sanders." After "Sanders" and "Stiller," her most memorable television appearance was the grown Mabel, child of Helen Hunt and Paul Reiser's characters on the series finale of "Mad About You" (NBC, 1992-99).

After "Saturday Night Live," Garofalo bounced frequently between movies and television, with hit-and-miss results. "Reality Bites" (1994), directed by Stiller, was an attempt to compartmentalize the 1990s youth culture into a wan love story, but her turn as an off-kilter sidekick to Winona Ryder offered some of the film's few bright spots. Other movies, like "Now and Then" (1995), "Bye Bye Love" (1995), and "Sweethearts" (1996), were largely ignored by audiences. She fared slightly better in comedies like Stiller's "The Cable Guy" (1996) - in which she had a brief role as a waitress at a medieval-themed restaurant - the Bill Murray picture "Larger than Life" (1996), and "The Truth About Cats and Dogs" (1996), which gave her a rare lead role. She reportedly found the latter film unpleasant due to its trite romantic storyline, but Garofalo gave a charming performance all the same. She also scored as a bitter former high schooler-turned-bitter adult in "Romy and Michele's High School Reunion" (1997). Interestingly, Garofalo turned down two projects which went on to be colossal hits - Wes Craven's "Scream" (1996), and "Friends" (NBC, 1994-2004). She was also considered for Renee Zellweger's role in "Jerry Maguire" (1996), but asked to lose weight for the part. Sadly, after completing the request, she discovered that the role had gone to Zellweger.

For the rest of the nineties, Garofalo marked time in less-than-inspired films, while touring frequently on the comedy circuit. Among the better pictures during this period was "Cop Land" (1997), in which she gave a straight dramatic performance as a police officer, and Kevin Smith's "Dogma" (1999), for which she played Linda Fiorentino's co-worker at an abortion clinic. Both genres showed a knack for playing more than just the oddball character, and she continued to display these talents in interesting, independent-minded fare like HBO's "The Laramie Project" (2001) and "Wonderland" (2003). Garofalo also enjoyed lead billing in the very funny "Wet Hot American Summer" (2001), a silly parody of summer camp movies that also starred Paul Rudd, David Hyde Pierce and Amy Poehler.

After the events of Sept. 11, 2001, the ever outspoken patriot began to bring more of a political edge to her stand-up and interviews, and over the next few years, commented frequently in the media on George W. Bush's administration and the growing war in Iraq. Her "tells-it-as-she-sees-it" attitude made her a target of conservative pundits and talk show hosts, but earned her considerable respect from left-leaning publications and media groups. In 2004, she joined the on-air talent at Air America, where she co-hosted the program "The Minority Report" with comedian and writer Sam Seder. Her tenure on the program was brief and occasionally controversial. On more than one occasion, her views clashed sharply with Seder's, and the latter left the studio after one angry debate. Garofalo left the network in 2006 on good terms with Seder, and continued to contribute to the show on infrequent occasions until his program ended in 2007.

Garofalo continued to act during her stint on radio, most notably on the final season of "The West Wing" (NBC, 1999-2006), where she played a flinty campaign advisor to Jimmy Smits' Democratic Presidential nominee. She also filmed a number of failed pilots for television, most notably "Deal" (2005), which was based on the life of poker champion Annie Duke. She also did impressive work as the embittered ex-wife of alcoholic David Schwimmer in "Duane Hopwood" (2005), and lent her voice to several animated projects, including "The Wild" (2005) and Pixar's "Ratatouille" (2007). In 2007, she embarked on a national comedy tour with that film's lead voice, Patton Oswalt.

In 2007, Garofalo returned to editorializing as part of IFC's "The Henry Rollins Show" (2006- ). She contributed monologues on political and social subjects that were filmed in her apartment in New York.

VIEW THE FULL BIOGRAPHY

Filmographyclose complete filmography

CAST: (feature film)

1.
 Bad Parents (2013)
2.
3.
 Barbershop Punk (2010)
4.
 Love Hurts (2009)
5.
6.
7.
 Guitar, The (2008)
8.
9.
10.
 Ratatouille (2007)
VIEW THE FULL FILMOGRAPHY

Milestones close milestones

:
Raised in Madison, New Jersey until her last year of high school when she moved to Houston
1985:
While an undergraduate, began appearing at "open mike" nights at clubs in Boston
:
Won a cable TV contest to find the funniest person in Rhode Island
1986:
Spent three years performing in clubs, primarily in Boston and Houston but also on the road
1989:
Relocated to Los Angeles
:
Appeared on several TV comedy shows including MTV's "Half Hour Comedy Hour"
:
Met Ben Stiller
1991:
Film debut in small role in "Late for Dinner"
1991:
TV acting debut, "Passion," an unsold comedy pilot
:
TV series debut, in the ensemble of "The Ben Stiller Show" (Fox)
:
Played the booking agent on "The Larry Sanders Show" (HBO)
1994:
First major film role, "Reality Bites," directed by Stiller; also sang on the soundtrack
1994:
Briefly joined the cast of NBC's "Saturday Night Live"
1995:
Served as special correspondent on Michael Moore's series "TV Nation" (NBC)
1995:
Hosted the stand-up showcase, "Comedy Product" (Comedy Central); also co-produced
1995:
Headlined her own "HBO Comedy Half-Hour"
1995:
Breakthrough screen role as Randy Quaid's 'blind date-from-hell' in "Bye Bye, Love"
1996:
First feature lead as radio host Abby Barnes in "The Truth About Cats and Dogs"
1996:
Offered dramatic turn in a two-part episode of NBC's "Law & Order"
1996:
Memorable cameo appearance, playing a waitress at a medieval-themed restaurant in "The Cable Guy," directed by Ben Stiller
1997:
Starred in the romantic comedy "The Matchmaker"
1997:
Offered fine support as a chain-smoking cynical classmate in "Romy and Michele's High School Reunion"
1997:
Debut as feature producer "Sweethearts"; also starred
1997:
Delivered a dramatic turn as a deputy in "Cop Land"
1998:
Played an agent opposite Ben Stiller in "Permanent Midnight"
1998:
Cast as an FBI agent investigating a serial killer in "Clay Pigeons"
1998:
Provided the character voice of Sally on the series "Felicity" (The WB); Garofalo did not take onscreen credit for the role
1999:
Had supporting roles in indie films "Dogma" and "200 Cigarettes"
1999:
Played The Bowler in the comic book-inspired "The Mystery Men"
1999:
Appeared as a postal worker with romantic designs on a new co-worker who happens to be a serial killer in "The Minus Man"
2000:
Portrayed Anita Hoffman opposite Vincent D'Onofrio in the biopic "Steal This Movie," about 1960s radical Abbie Hoffman
2000:
Cast as Minnie Mogul in "The Adventures of Rocky and Bullwinkle"
2001:
Appeared in "Wet Hot American Summer"
2002:
Starred in "The Laramie Project," (HBO) a true story of an American town in the wake of the murder of Matthew Shepard
2003:
Cast in the film "Wonderland" based on the brutal murders which involved legendary porn star John Holmes
2004:
Starred opposite David Schwimmer in the drama "Duane Hopwood"; screened at Sundance
2004:
Co-hosted the Air America Radio's show "The Majority Report," alongside Sam Seder
2005:
Starred opposite Martin Short in the comedy "Jiminy Glick in La La Wood"
2005:
Joined the cast of the NBC drama "The West Wing," as a media strategist hired by Democratic presidential hopeful Matt Santos (Jimmy Smits)
2007:
Cast in the animated Pixar feature, "Ratatouille"
2007:
Joined the seventh season of Fox's "24" as a government agent
2007:
Co-starred in Richard Kelly's ensemble film, "Southland Tales"
VIEW ALL MILESTONES

Education

James E Taylor High School: Houston , Texas -
Providence College: Providence , Rhode Island - 1986
Providence College: Providence , Rhode Island - 1986

Notes

Garofalo has "think" tatooed on her wrist.

"Recently I got Diane English's latest script. It's for a sitcom that's going to be directed at Generation X people and it's about a bike messenger service: It's so uncool that it's unbelievable. What the fuck does Diane English know about being a bike messenger!? First of all you can't do comedy by committee and that's what TV is all about: groups of uncreative people making decisions and trying to reach the lowest common denominator. If you keep spoon-feeding people shit, that's what they're going to ask you for. And also more literate types don't watch that much TV. There's a reason for that: if there was better stuff on, they'd watch it. It's not that people hate the object known as the television, they hate the insulting programming. I love bad TV: I get a big kick out of "Chips" [sic] reruns, and "Melrose Place" is so abominable that I love it, but I'm watching it because it's so bad I enjoy it; it's like a car wreck." --From Paper, December 1993.

"I'm jealous of her in every category. She's funnier than I am, more feminine than I am, and has a better career than I do." --Garry Shandling half-joking to Entertainment Weekly, July 21, 1995.

"[God] seems very man-made to me. There are so many theories, and no everyone can be right. It's human nature to need a religious crutch, and I don't begrudge anyone that. I just don't need one." --Janeane Garofalo to Mr. Showbiz.com website, December 4, 1995.

"I'm a harsh critic, and I hate EVERYTHING that I ever do, The only thing I'm proud of is 'Larry Sanders'. Everything else I take great issue with. My best experience was 'The Ben Stiller Show'. My worst experience was 'Saturday Night Live'. That's well-documented. No need to go into that." --Garofalo to Us, April 1996.

"When Janeane smiles, she is one of the most beautiful girls I have ever known." --friend and co-star Vince Vaughn to The Chicago Sun-Times, October 5, 1997.

"Real life, bodywise, I'm OK. But something happens when you put me on film. I turn in to Gerard Depardieu, I become Rock Solid Girl." --Garofalo to The Chicago Sun-Times, October 5, 1997.

"I don't get offered a lot of star roles. My agent would prefer to think I'm star material, but if the supporting role is good, I'm willing to do it." --Janeane Garofalo to USA Today, October 6, 1997.

"I thought I had style that would be interesting. I thought "I had a way with telling a story and plus, I just wanted it. There were a number of comics who were more in the conversational storytelling genre of stand up comedy that appealed to me. Maybe it's just youthful ignorance and naivete--there's definitely gotta be some narcissism there. You don't become an actor or a stand up comic without some degree of narcissistic intent because, really, why do you believe somebody wants to see you talk behind a microphone?"-Garofalo

Companions close complete companion listing

companion:
Ben Stiller. Actor, director. Had brief relationship c. 1992.
companion:
Bob Odenkirk. Actor, comedian. No longer together.
companion:
Mitch Rouse. Actor, director. Appeared together in "Truth About Cats and Dogs" and "Sweethearts"; separated in the spring of 1997.
companion:
Craig Bierko. Actor. Appeared together in the 1999 short "The Cherry Picker"; reportedly developing a comedy act together; no longer together.
companion:
Pete Caldes. Musician. Drummer with the Boston rock band The Gravel Pit.
VIEW COMPLETE COMPANION LISTING

Family close complete family listing

father:
Carmine Garofalo. Executive. Lived in Houston, Texas; worked for Exxon.
mother:
Joan Garofalo. Secretary. Lived in Madison, New Jersey.

Bibliography close complete biography

"Feel This Book"

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