skip navigation
Overview for Lionel Atwill
Lionel Atwill

Lionel Atwill

Up
Down

| VIEW ALL

TCM Messageboards
Post your comments here
ADD YOUR COMMENT>

share:

TCM Archive Materials VIEW ALL ARCHIVES (16)

Recent DVDs

Errol Flynn:... The Adventures of Errol Flynn, Captain Blood, Dodge City, the Private Lives of... more info $45.95was $59.98 Buy Now

Junior G-Men... The complete "Junior G-Men of the Air" serial on two DVDs. more info $9.95was $10.98 Buy Now

Lost City of... Death duels in the lush jungles of Asia, as government agents battle war... more info $7.95was $9.99 Buy Now

Sherlock... The legendary Sherlock Holmes squares off once again against his nemesis, the... more info $4.95was $9.95 Buy Now

The Great... Comedy about a troup of French actors who set out to deflate the ego of... more info $10.95was $17.99 Buy Now

Rendezvous ... Intrigue, plot twists and romantic jealousy drive this riveting World War I... more info $15.96was $19.99 Buy Now

Also Known As: Lionel Alfred William Atwill Died: April 22, 1946
Born: March 1, 1885 Cause of Death: pneumonia
Birth Place: Croydon, England, GB Profession: Cast ... actor director
RATE AND COMMENT

BIOGRAPHY

Prolific British stage actor who came to America in 1916 and starred as a romantic lead on Broadway. Although Atwill made his screen debut in 1916, he is best known as the suavely menacing villain (most often a sinister mad doctor) of countless Hollywood horror films of the 1930s and 40s, most notably "Doctor X" (1932), "The Mystery of the Wax Museum" (1933, an especially superb performance), "Murders in the Zoo" (1933) and "The Hound of the Baskervilles" (1939). He was also memorable as the stolid, one-armed police chief doggedly searching for the monster in the horror sequel, "Son of Frankenstein" (1939). Rather stocky in middle age, with an incisive manner and a rich voice beautifully suited to the delivery of ruefully ironic dialogue, Atwill also gave a fine account of himself as one of several men dangerously obsessed with Concha (Marlene Dietrich) in Josef von Sternberg's memorable "The Devil Is a Woman" (1935).

Please support TCMDB by adding to this information.

Click here to contribute