skip navigation
Clark Gable

Clark Gable

Up
Down

| VIEW ALL

TCM Messageboards
Post your comments here
ADD YOUR COMMENT>

share:

TCM Archive Materials VIEW ALL ARCHIVES (35)

Recent DVDs

 
 

Mutiny On The Bounty (1935)... HMS Bounty sails for Tahiti by way of Cape Horn... and into movie lore as an... more info $9.99was $19.98 Buy Now

Mutiny On The Bounty: Special Edition... 1787. HMS Bounty sets out on a journey that will take it through perilous seas... more info $12.99was $26.98 Buy Now

MGM: When the Lion Roars... On April 24, 1924 the movies changed forever: the Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer studio... more info $12.99was $29.98 Buy Now

No Man Of Her Own DVD Real life couple, Clark Gable and Carole Lombard made their one and only on... more info $14.98was $14.98 Buy Now

Clark Gable Collection: Volume 1... Cinema Classics CollectionCall Of The Wild (1935)An all-star cast of Hollywood... more info $49.98was $49.98 Buy Now

It Happened One Night (Repackaged)... When her father threatens to annul her marriage to a fortune-hunting playboy,... more info $14.99was $14.99 Buy Now

Also Known As: William Clark Gable, Billy Gable, W C Gable, Lst Lieut. Clark Gable Died: November 16, 1960
Born: February 1, 1901 Cause of Death: heart attack
Birth Place: Cadiz, Ohio, USA Profession: actor, call boy, lumberjack, tie salesman, tire factory worker, oil driller

Biography CLOSE THE FULL BIOGRAPHY

The definition of American masculinity, Clark Gable was officially proclaimed the "King of Hollywood" during his Golden Age heyday. Initially considered too rough-hewn to play the romantic lead, Gable's virile persona soon earned him scores of fans in films like "A Free Soul" (1931), "Red Dust" (1932) and "San Francisco" (1936). He won an Oscar for his role in Frank Capra's "It Happened One Night" (1934), made women swoon as Fletcher Christian in "Mutiny on the Bounty" (1935), and charmed as roguish Rhett Butler in the epic "Gone with the Wind" (1939). Gable's delivery of the latter film's classic line, "Frankly, my dear, I don't give a damn," was soon among the most quoted in the history of cinema. An oft-married Gable briefly found romantic bliss with his third wife, comedienne Carole Lombard, whose premature death in a 1942 plane crash permanently dampened Gable's insatiable lust for life. After distinguishing himself in combat during World War II with the Army Air Corps, Gable returned to Hollywood in 1945, albeit with a noticeably diminished spark. Although many of his late-career efforts were unremarkable, there were exceptions, such as the jungle adventure "Mogambo" (1953) and the naval...

The definition of American masculinity, Clark Gable was officially proclaimed the "King of Hollywood" during his Golden Age heyday. Initially considered too rough-hewn to play the romantic lead, Gable's virile persona soon earned him scores of fans in films like "A Free Soul" (1931), "Red Dust" (1932) and "San Francisco" (1936). He won an Oscar for his role in Frank Capra's "It Happened One Night" (1934), made women swoon as Fletcher Christian in "Mutiny on the Bounty" (1935), and charmed as roguish Rhett Butler in the epic "Gone with the Wind" (1939). Gable's delivery of the latter film's classic line, "Frankly, my dear, I don't give a damn," was soon among the most quoted in the history of cinema. An oft-married Gable briefly found romantic bliss with his third wife, comedienne Carole Lombard, whose premature death in a 1942 plane crash permanently dampened Gable's insatiable lust for life. After distinguishing himself in combat during World War II with the Army Air Corps, Gable returned to Hollywood in 1945, albeit with a noticeably diminished spark. Although many of his late-career efforts were unremarkable, there were exceptions, such as the jungle adventure "Mogambo" (1953) and the naval action-drama "Run Silent, Run Deep" (1958). His final performance, however, also proved to be one of his best, when he was cast opposite troubled co-stars Marilyn Monroe and Montgomery Clift in "The Misfits" (1961). As befitting his iconic stature, America was informed of Gable's sudden passing with the reverent headline "The King is Dead."

VIEW THE FULL BIOGRAPHY

Filmographyclose complete filmography

CAST: (feature film)

1.
 Going Hollywood: The War Years (1983) Himself (Archival Footage)
2.
 The Misfits (1961) Gay Langland
3.
 It Started in Naples (1960) Michael Hamilton
4.
 But Not for Me (1959) Russell Ward
5.
 Run Silent Run Deep (1958) Commander "P. J." Richardson
6.
 Teacher's Pet (1958) James Gannon, also know as "Jim Gallagher"
7.
 Band of Angels (1957) Hamish Bond
8.
 The King and Four Queens (1956) Dan Kehoe
9.
 The Tall Men (1955) Ben Allison
10.
 Soldier of Fortune (1955) Hank Lee
VIEW THE FULL FILMOGRAPHY

Milestones close milestones

1901:
Mother died when he was nine months old; sent to live with maternal grandparents
1903:
Father and stepmother reclaimed him
1910:
Family settles in Hopedale, Ohio
1917:
Moved to Ravenna with father and stepmother; eventually returned to Hopedale
1915:
Amateur acting debut in school play
1919:
Settled in Akron and worked in a tire factory
1921:
After stepmother's death, moved to Tulsa, Oklahoma with his father
1922:
Joined Astoria Players Stock Company
1924:
Became a member of Josephine Dillon's Stock Company
1924:
Moved to Hollywood
1924:
First film as actor, a bit part in "Forbidden Paradise"
1925:
Can be spotted as an extra in Erich von Stroheim's "The Merry Widow"
1928:
Broadway debut, "Machinal"
1930:
Signed contract with MGM
1931:
First sound film as actor in "The Painted Desert"
1931:
Attracted attention when he pushed reigning screen queen Norma Shearer around (in the role of her brutish gangster lover) in "A Free Soul"; subsequent leading role opposite other MGM divas Greta Garbo and Joan Crawford confirmed his star status
1932:
Starred in "Red Dust"
1934:
Won Best Actor Oscar for comic role of a newspaperman chasing a runaway heiress in "It Happened One Night"
1935:
Picked up second Academy Award nomination for performance as Fletcher Christian in "Mutiny on the Bounty"
1937:
Made rare box-office flop, "Parnell", a biopic about the Irish statesman
1937:
Sued by a woman from England who claimed that he was the father of her 13 year-old child; Gable was able to prove that he was in Oregon in 1923 when the child was conceived
1939:
Starred in his best-remembered film, "Gone With the Wind", as Rhett Butler; received third Oscar nomination
1942:
Enlisted in Army Air Corps as private; last film for three years, "Somewhere I'll Find You"
1944:
Discharged as Major
1944:
Awarded Air Medal
1945:
Made first film after returning from war service, "Adventure"
1953:
Starred in "Mogambo", playing the leading role in the remake of the 1932 film "Red Dust" in which he also starred
1954:
Parted company with MGM
1956:
Formed Russ-Field-Gabco production company (with Jane Russell and her husband Bob Waterfield)
1961:
Starred in last film, "The Misfits"
1976:
Portrayed in the feature biopic "Gable and Lombard" by James Brolin (Jill Clayburgh played Carole Lombard)
VIEW ALL MILESTONES

Education

Edinburgh High School: Hopedale , Ohio -

Companions close complete companion listing

wife:
Josephine Dillon. Actor. Married in December 1924; divorced in April 1930; born c. 1889.
companion:
Joan Crawford. Actor. Reportedly had an on-again, off-again relationship over a 10-year period; frequently co-starred together in such films as "Dancing Lady" (1933) and "Strange Cargo" (1940).
wife:
Rhea Langham. Married on June 19, 1931; divorced in March 1939.
companion:
Loretta Young. Actor. Had affair during filming of 1935's "The Call of the Wild"; gave birth to Gable's daughter Mary Judith but passed her off as an adopted child; daughter did not learn truth of parentage until she was an adult.
wife:
Carole Lombard. Actor. Married from March 29, 1939 until her death in a plane crash on January 16, 1942; popular film star in the 1930s and early 40s in such films as "Twentieth Century" (1934), "My Man Godfrey" (1936), "Nothing Sacred" (1937) and "To Be or Not to Be" (1942); acted opposite Gable in the 1932 "No Man of Her Own".
wife:
Lady Sylvia Ashley. Former actor. Married on December 20, 1949, divorced in 1952.
wife:
Kay Williams Spreckels. Married from July 1955 until his death in 1960.
VIEW COMPLETE COMPANION LISTING

Family close complete family listing

father:
William Henry Gable. Oil driller.
mother:
Adeline Gable. Born c. 1870; Roman Catholic; died on November 14, 1901.
step-mother:
Jennie Gable. Died in 1920.
daughter:
Judy Lewis. Psychotherapist, former actor. Born on November 6, 1935; mother, Loretta Young; Lewis believed she was adopted until she learned the truth of her parentage as an adult.
step-daughter:
Joan Spreckels.
son:
John Clark Gable. Actor. Mother, Kay Spreckels; born shortly after Gable's death on March 20, 1961.
VIEW COMPLETE FAMILY LISTING

Please support TCMDB by adding to this information.

Click here to contribute