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Sidney J. Furie

Sidney J. Furie

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Also Known As: Sidney Furie Died:
Born: February 28, 1933 Cause of Death:
Birth Place: Toronto, Ontario, CA Profession: director, screenwriter, producer

Biography CLOSE THE FULL BIOGRAPHY

The career of Canadian filmmaker Sidney J Furie perfectly demonstrates how a reputation for workmanlike efficiency can keep a director regularly employed, despite a dearth of critical acclaim. Furie decided he wanted to be a filmmaker when he was six years old, after seeing his first film, "Captains Courageous" (1937), and showed early promise in his native Canada with his directing debut, the autobiographical "A Dangerous Age" (1957), and as creator of the series "Hudson's Bay" (CBC, 1959). After moving to Great Britain in 1960, he dabbled in the horror genre ("Doctor Blood's Coffin" and "The Snake Woman", both 1961) and helmed "Three on a Spree" (also 1961), yet another remake of "Brewster's Millions", before experiencing his first big success with the teen musical "Wonderful to Be Young/The Young Ones" (1962), which boasted the choreography of Herbert Ross and enjoyed a box office in England that year second only to "Dr. Who". It was, however, the mean-street melodrama "The Leather Boys" which demonstrated his sharp eye for sleazy detail and brought Furie to the attention of producer Harry Saltzman, who hired him to direct "The Ipcress File" (1965), the first and best of Len Deighton's Harry...

The career of Canadian filmmaker Sidney J Furie perfectly demonstrates how a reputation for workmanlike efficiency can keep a director regularly employed, despite a dearth of critical acclaim. Furie decided he wanted to be a filmmaker when he was six years old, after seeing his first film, "Captains Courageous" (1937), and showed early promise in his native Canada with his directing debut, the autobiographical "A Dangerous Age" (1957), and as creator of the series "Hudson's Bay" (CBC, 1959). After moving to Great Britain in 1960, he dabbled in the horror genre ("Doctor Blood's Coffin" and "The Snake Woman", both 1961) and helmed "Three on a Spree" (also 1961), yet another remake of "Brewster's Millions", before experiencing his first big success with the teen musical "Wonderful to Be Young/The Young Ones" (1962), which boasted the choreography of Herbert Ross and enjoyed a box office in England that year second only to "Dr. Who". It was, however, the mean-street melodrama "The Leather Boys" which demonstrated his sharp eye for sleazy detail and brought Furie to the attention of producer Harry Saltzman, who hired him to direct "The Ipcress File" (1965), the first and best of Len Deighton's Harry Palmer spy series.

Filmographyclose complete filmography

DIRECTOR:

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3.
4.
  Under Heavy Fire (2003) Director
5.
  Detention (2003)
6.
  Rock My World (2002) Director
7.
  Cord (2000) Director
8.
  My 5 Wives (2000) Director
9.
  My Five Wives (2000) Director
10.
  Collectors, The (1999) Director

CAST: (feature film)

VIEW THE FULL FILMOGRAPHY

Milestones close milestones

:
Worked as an apprentice in Canadian TV
1957:
Raised $19,000 to make first independent feature, "A Dangerous Age", based largely on his youthful experiences; produced and scripted, as well as helmed
1959:
Created "Hudson's Bay" series for the Canadian Broadcasting Company
1960:
Immigrated to England
1962:
Directed "Wonderful to Be Young/The Young Ones", a musical boasting Herbert Ross as choreographer; opened to business in England second only to the James Bond adventure "Dr. No"
1965:
Helmed another musical, "Swinger's Paradise/Wonderful Life"
1965:
"The Leather Boys", a film mixing homosexuality and motorcycles, garnerd critical acclaim and brought him to the attention of producer (and fellow Canadian) Harry Saltzman
1965:
For Saltzman, directed "The Ipcress File", a spy story starring Michael Caine; its box office success in England and the United States led to his first US directing opportunity; earned British Academy Award as Best Picture
1966:
US directing debut, "The Appaloosa", starring Marlon Brando
1967:
Directed Frank Sinatra in "The Naked Runner"
:
Signed a four-picture deal with Paramount
1970:
Helmed and scripted (with Harold Buchman) "The Lawyer", creating the character of Tony Petrocelli played by Barry Newman; Newman would reprise the character in the NBC series "Petrocelli" (1974-1976), with Furie credited as co-creator
1970:
Asked by studio to take over "Little Fauss and Big Halsy", originally scheduled to be directed by its screenwriter Charles Eastman
1972:
Enjoyed commercial success with Billie Holiday biopic, "Lady Sings the Blues"; Diana Ross earned Best Actress Oscar nomination
1973:
Fourth pic of Paramount deal, "Hit", reteamed him with Richard Pryor and Billy Dee Williams from "Lady Sings the Blues"
1978:
Co-wrote (with Richard Natkin) and helmed "The Boys in Company C", which featured a standout performance by Stan Shaw, whipping green Marine recruits in shape for Vietnam
1983:
Helmed sensational and exploitive "The Entity", based on a true case history of the paranormal
1984:
Reteamed with Natkin to write "Purple Hearts", a Vietnam love story; also produced and directed; first screen collaboration with Ken Wahl
1986:
Initiated the "Iron Eagle" franchise, a pale imitation of "Top Gun"; co-wrote original and "Iron Eagle II" (1988) with Kevin Elders
1987:
Effectively killed the Superman franchise with atrocious "Superman IV: The Quest for Peace"
1991:
Authored the story for and helmed "The Taking of Beverly Hills"; reteamed with Ken Wahl
1992:
Last feature to date to receive a theatrical release, "Ladybugs", starring Rodney Dangerfield
1994:
Helmed the pilot for syndicated Canadian-produced series, "Lonesome Dove: The Outlaw Years"
1996:
Took to the air one last time with "Iron Eagle IV", downgraded from feature film to cable movie; aired on HBO
:
Directed a string of TV and straight-to-video projects including "Hollow Point" (HBO, 1997), "Married to a Stranger" (The Family Channel, 1998), "Top of the World" (HBO, 1998), "The Collectors" (filmed 1998), "The Rage" (1998), "Cord" (2000), "Tripwire" (filmed 2000)
1998:
Helmed episodes of the syndicated series "V.I.P."
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Education

Carnegie Institute of Technology: Pittsburgh , Pennsylvania -

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