skip navigation
William Friedkin

William Friedkin

| VIEW ALL

TCM Messageboards
Post your comments here
ADD YOUR COMMENT>

share:

TCM Archive Materials VIEW ALL ARCHIVES (1)

Recent DVDs

 
 

Boys In The Band DVD Actors: Frederick Combs, Leonard Frey, Cliff Gorman, Laurence Luckinbill, Murray... more info $26.98was $26.98 Buy Now

The French Connection DVD New York City detectives "Popeye" Doyle (Gene Hackman) and Buddy Russo (Roy... more info $14.98was $14.98 Buy Now

The French Connection / The French... The French Connection:Two narcotics detectives, "Popeye" Doyle and his partner... more info $14.98was $14.98 Buy Now

Bug DVD Step into a strange world full of government experiments gone wrong in this... more info $14.98was $14.98 Buy Now

The French Connection: Award Series... This fast-paced, multi-award-winning 1971 police drama stars Gene Hackman and... more info $14.98was $14.98 Buy Now

To Live And Die In L.A.... MORE > $14.98 Regularly $14.98 Buy Now blu-ray

Also Known As: Died:
Born: August 29, 1935 Cause of Death:
Birth Place: Chicago, Illinois, USA Profession: director, producer, screenwriter, mail room worker, studio floor manager

Biography CLOSE THE FULL BIOGRAPHY

One of the most powerful film directors of the 1970's, Academy Award-winning director William Friedkin was representative of Hollywood's first wave of hip, hot, young super-directors. Famed for his boisterous talent and booming ego, Friedkin earned a reputation for drawing out brilliant performances from his actors - by whatever means necessary. While a few of the director's notoriously manipulative tactics seemed questionable, no one could argue their effectiveness. Just five years after making his feature film debut, Friedkin snagged the Best Director Oscar for "The French Connection" (1971). The director's landmark achievement, however, would be his 1973 filmic adaptation of William Peter Blatty's "The Exorcist." A landmark in special effects, make-up and storytelling, "The Exorcist" grossed - and grossed-out - millions. Noted for the stylized documentary look of his dramas, Friedkin's talents catapulted him to the front rank of American directors. The husband of former Paramount Pictures head honcho, Sherry Lansing since 1991, Friedkin's career remained active well into the next century.

One of the most powerful film directors of the 1970's, Academy Award-winning director William Friedkin was representative of Hollywood's first wave of hip, hot, young super-directors. Famed for his boisterous talent and booming ego, Friedkin earned a reputation for drawing out brilliant performances from his actors - by whatever means necessary. While a few of the director's notoriously manipulative tactics seemed questionable, no one could argue their effectiveness. Just five years after making his feature film debut, Friedkin snagged the Best Director Oscar for "The French Connection" (1971). The director's landmark achievement, however, would be his 1973 filmic adaptation of William Peter Blatty's "The Exorcist." A landmark in special effects, make-up and storytelling, "The Exorcist" grossed - and grossed-out - millions. Noted for the stylized documentary look of his dramas, Friedkin's talents catapulted him to the front rank of American directors. The husband of former Paramount Pictures head honcho, Sherry Lansing since 1991, Friedkin's career remained active well into the next century.

Filmographyclose complete filmography

DIRECTOR:

1.
  I Am Wrath (2014)
2.
  Bug (2006)
3.
  Hunted, The (2003) Director
4.
  Rules of Engagement (2000) Director
5.
  12 Angry Men (1997) Director
6.
  Jade (1995) Director
7.
  Blue Chips (1994) Director
8.
  Jailbreakers (1994) Director
9.
  Guardian, The (1990) Director
10.

CAST: (feature film)

1.
 Fuller Life, A (2014)
4.
 Without Limits (1998) Tv Director
7.
8.
 Intimate Portrait: Linda Blair (2001) Interviewee
9.
 History Vs. Hollywood (2001) Interviewee ("The French Connection")
10.
 AFI's 100 Years... 100 Thrills (2001) Interviewee
VIEW THE FULL FILMOGRAPHY

Milestones close milestones

:
Began career in mailroom of WGN-TV, Chicago; eventually moved up to director
1962:
Helmed first TV-movie, "The People vs. Paul Crump," a 16mm documentary
1965:
Moved to Los Angeles
1965:
Hired to direct episodes of NBC's "Alfred Hitchcok Presents", including the final broadcast
1967:
Directed first feature, "Good Times", starring Sonny and Cher
1968:
Directed "The Night They Raided Minsky's," an affectionate look at burlesque; production was slightly hampered by death of co-star Bert Lahr during filming
1968:
Filmed a somewhat static feature adaptation of Harold Pinter's stage play "The Birthday Party"
1970:
Helmed "The Boys in the Band", adapted from the Mart Crowley play
1971:
Won the Best Director Oscar for "The French Connection"
1973:
Had box-office hit with screen version of "The Exorcist"
1973:
Formed the Directors Company, a partnership with Peter Bogdanovich and Francis Ford Coppola; split after one year
1977:
Suffered career setback with the box-office failure of "Sorcerer", a remake of Henri-Georges Clouzot's "The Wages of Fear"
1978:
Helmed comic period piece, "The Brink's Job", about the infamous 1950 Boston heist
1980:
Directed and penned first screenplay, "Cruising"; film sparked controversy over its depiction of the gay community in NYC
1983:
Attempted satire of international weapons merchants in "Deal of the Century", starring Chevy Chase
1985:
Helmed and co-scripted "To Live and Die in L.A."
1986:
Returned to TV to direct Barbra Streisand's HBO special, "Putting It Together--The Making of 'The Broadway Album'"
1986:
Executive produced, created and directed the NBC pilot "C.A.T. Squad" and its 1988 TV-movie sequel
1987:
Helmed "Rampage," a film which dealt with the death penalty and the complexity of the insanity plea; release delayed when De Laurentis Entertainment went bankrupt (released in 1992)
1990:
Returned to horror with "The Guardian"; also co-scripted
1992:
Continued in the horror vein directing "On a Dead Man's Chest" episode of HBO's "Tales From the Crypt"
1994:
Helmed "Jailbreakers" segment of Showtime's "Rebel Highway" series
1994:
Returned to features as director of the sports-themed "Blue Chips", scripted by Ron Shelton
1995:
Helmed third film in Joe Eszterhas' "sleaze" trilogy, "Jade"
1997:
Directed the acclaimed small screen remake of "12 Angry Men" (Showtime)
1997:
Received star number 2,093 on the Hollywood Walk of Fame (August 14)
1998:
Directed Alban Berg's opera "Wozzeck" in Florence, Italy with Zubin Mehta conducting
2000:
Directed "Rules of Engagement" a film produced by Richard D. Zanuck, the executive who greenlit his most popular film "The French Connection"
2002:
Staged two productions for the Los Angeles Opera
2002:
Directed Benicio Del Toro in "The Hunted"; production was shut down in June 2001 when Del Toro was injured days before principal photography was due to end (completed several months later)
2007:
Directed the psychological horror film, "Bug" starring Ashley Judd and Harry Connick Jr.
VIEW ALL MILESTONES

Education

Senn High School: Chicago , Illinois -

Notes

"I always aim at the stars and sometimes I hit Dresden. But I set out, as Wernher Von Braun did with every rocket, to take it to the moon." --William Friedkin on aiming his films at the widest possible audience to Los Angeles Times, November 19, 1989.

Although it never aired on the small screen, Friedkin's first TV film, "The People vs. Crump", was instrumental in saving the life of its subject, a man who had spent several years on death row.

"I never made the film ["Cruising"] to have anything to do with the gay community other than as a background for a murder mystery. It was not meant to be pro or con, gay rights, or gay anything. It was an exotic background that people, I knew, hadn't seen in a mainstream film. That's what intrigued me about it. I had never seen it, but heard about it and decided to go around to the various clubs and saw what was going on. I decided to write the story based on what I'd seen and on a story that one of the 'French Connection' cops told me that he'd experienced when he was sent as a decoy in the gay world to catch a killer who was targeting gays. That situation really screwed him up. It made him start to question his sexuality. Some of the best stuff was cut out of it. It was compromised severely. It should've gone out as an 'X' picture, but they couldn't." --Friedkin quoted in Venice, August 1997

"I burned a lot of bridges. I treated Diller and Sheinberg and Eisner with contempt. The more powerful they got, the easier it was for them to remember the way I had carried on with them. Those people on the elevator going up were the ones I met going down. There was a lot of resistance to my doing films at some of these studios.

"I never set out to make a bad film. I thought in each case they were going to be as good or better than anything I had done. I went through this long period of wondering why I wasn't being received in the same way. Now I've reached the point where I know why. These films just weren't any fucking good. They have no soul, no heart--they don't even have any technical expertise. It's as though someone reached up inside of an animal and pulled the guts out. The thing that drove me and still keeps me going is 'Citizen Kane'. I hope to one day make a film to rank with that. I haven't yet." --Friedkin to Peter Biskind in Premiere, May 1998

On his ruthless treatment of Mercedes McCambridge (vocal double for Satan) on the set of "The Exorcist": "I had her tied to a chair for a month while we recorded. I squeezed her, I tortured her, I shoved raw eggs and whisky down her throat and made her chain-smoke so we could get the sounds we wanted. She was a lapsed Catholic and a reformed drunk, so it really whipped her out of shape. She had two friends of hers who were priests, and when she'd start to blubber after takes, they'd give her counseling. Did it bother me? Nah, I was just making a movie." --Friedkin to The Guardian, October 18, 1998

About meeting Alfred Hitchcock: "Hitchcock came over and I told him I was really honored to meet him and I extended my hand. And he gave me his hand like a royal hand show. He handed it to me like a dead fish to shake and he said: 'Mr. Friedkin, I see that you're not wearing a tie.' And I thought he was putting me on. I said: 'No sir, I didn't put on a tie today.' And he said: 'Usually our directors wear ties.' And he walked away.

"... a few years later ... I was at the Directors Guild Awards in Los Angeles and the film ["The French Connection"] had won and I came down the platform with this director's award in my arms. It was in a banquet room and there at the first table was Hitchcock. I had a tuxedo with one of those flashy string bow ties, and I went down to Hitchcock, holding my award and I snapped my tie and said: "How do you like the tie, Hitch?' And he sort of stared at me. Of course he didn't remember at all." --Friedkin quoted in The Guardian, October 22, 1998.

On the famous car chase from "The French Connection": "We'd been shooting for a number of days on elements for the chase, and it occurred to me that we didn't have anything really dangerous, and not a lot of speed. Bill Hickman, who was the stunt driver on 'Bullit', was our man, and one night I got him drunk and told him, 'You know, Bill, you're a pussy. You've shown me nothing, and I don't think we have much of a chase.' He immediately rose to the challenge and said, 'You wanna see some hairy driving? Have you got the balls to get in my car?' So next day we strapped a camera to the front of the car, I got in the back with a handheld, and my memory is that he just drove through 26 blocks of traffic ... just kept his foot on the gas. One take. And this one take is cut into ... the chase over and over, Bill going in the wrong lane and cutting off opposing traffic. It's only by the grace of God we didn't kill ourselves or somebody." --quoted in Sight and Sound, January 2000.

Companions close complete companion listing

companion:
Kitty Hawks. Model. Also worked in an advertising agency; daughter of Howard Hawks; introduced to Friedkin by playwright Mart Crowly c. 1969 during the filming of "Boys in the Band"; lived together; announced engagement but separated in June 1971.
companion:
Jennifer Nairn-Smith. Dancer. Met in 1972; together for four years; twice announced engagement; mother of Friedkin's son Cedric.
companion:
Ellen Burstyn. Actor. Worked together on "The Exorcist" (1973); Burstyn claims they had an affair c. 1976; Friedkin disputes it claiming they were "just friends".
wife:
Jeanne Moreau. Actor, director. Married in 1977; divorced in 1979.
wife:
Lesley-Anne Down. Actor. Married in 1982; divorced in 1985; mother of Friedkin's son Jack; engaged in bitter custody dispute over son.
wife:
Kelly Lange. Newscaster. Married in June 1987; filed for divorce in December 1990.
wife:
Sherry Lansing. Producer, executive. Married on July 6, 1991 in Barbados.
VIEW COMPLETE COMPANION LISTING

Family close complete family listing

father:
Louis Friedkin. Clothing store salesman, former merchant seaman and semipro softball player. Died indigent in Chicago.
mother:
Raechael Friedkin. Nurse.
son:
Cedric Nairn-Smith. Born on November 27, 1976; mother, Jennifer Nairn-Smith.
son:
Jack Friedkin. Born c. 1983; mother Lesley-Anne Down.
VIEW COMPLETE FAMILY LISTING

Bibliography close complete biography

"William Friedkin: Films of Aberration, Obsession and Reality" McFarland

Please support TCMDB by adding to this information.

Click here to contribute