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Michael J. Fox

Michael J. Fox

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For Love Or Money DVD This 1993 romantic comedy stars Michael J. Fox as clever concierge, Doug... more info $14.98was $14.98 Buy Now

The Secret Of My Success... Young, naive Brantley, played by Michael J. Fox, comes from his Iowa farm town... more info $9.99was $9.99 Buy Now

The Hard Way DVD The glamour of L.A. meets the clamor of N.Y.C. in "The Hard Way" (1991), a... more info $14.98was $14.98 Buy Now

Michael J. Fox Comedy Favorites Collection... This 3-set disc includes a treasure of Michael J. Fox comedies. Fox takes on the... more info $14.98was $14.98 Buy Now

Greedy DVD "Greedy" (1994) is a laugh-out-loud comedy about gluttony and excess. Kirk... more info $9.99was $9.99 Buy Now

Class Of 1984 DVD School's out forever in "Class of 1984" (1982)! Perry King stars as a music... more info $9.98was $9.98 Buy Now

Also Known As: Michael J Fox, Michael Andrew Fox Died:
Born: June 9, 1961 Cause of Death:
Birth Place: Edmonton, Alberta, CA Profession: actor, director, guitar player

Biography CLOSE THE FULL BIOGRAPHY

With two long-running sitcoms, multiple Emmy Awards and a top-grossing film series to his name, actor Michael J. Fox might have spent the rest of his life at the forefront of Hollywood's A-list, had the debilitating symptoms of Parkinson's disease not limited the actor's screen career. The Canadian actor was one of the biggest stars of the 1980s, first embodying the Reagan-era culture clash with his role as an aspiring yuppie teen on the sitcom "Family Ties" (NBC, 1982-89). He parlayed his flawless comic timing and clean-cut good looks into a successful film career as amiable boys-next-door, including one with access to a havoc-wreaking time machine in the mega blockbuster "Back to the Future" franchise. Fox challenged his image with grittier roles in films like "Bright Lights Big City" (1988), but more consistently scored as officious young professionals, like his starring role as deputy mayor on the sitcom "Spin City" (ABC, 1996-2002). In 1998, Fox disclosed that he had been diagnosed with the neurological disorder, Parkinson's disease, and semi-retired from acting in 2000, occasionally surfacing as a sitcom guest and voice actor in animated family films including the "Stuart Little" (1999) series....

With two long-running sitcoms, multiple Emmy Awards and a top-grossing film series to his name, actor Michael J. Fox might have spent the rest of his life at the forefront of Hollywood's A-list, had the debilitating symptoms of Parkinson's disease not limited the actor's screen career. The Canadian actor was one of the biggest stars of the 1980s, first embodying the Reagan-era culture clash with his role as an aspiring yuppie teen on the sitcom "Family Ties" (NBC, 1982-89). He parlayed his flawless comic timing and clean-cut good looks into a successful film career as amiable boys-next-door, including one with access to a havoc-wreaking time machine in the mega blockbuster "Back to the Future" franchise. Fox challenged his image with grittier roles in films like "Bright Lights Big City" (1988), but more consistently scored as officious young professionals, like his starring role as deputy mayor on the sitcom "Spin City" (ABC, 1996-2002). In 1998, Fox disclosed that he had been diagnosed with the neurological disorder, Parkinson's disease, and semi-retired from acting in 2000, occasionally surfacing as a sitcom guest and voice actor in animated family films including the "Stuart Little" (1999) series. But with this new calling, Fox dedicated himself to publicizing the need for increased stem cell research for his disease as well as many other afflictions. While Fox's steady presence was missed on primetime, his inspirational advocacy on behalf of Parkinson's sufferers ultimately left a more important legacy than his roster of popular comedies.

VIEW THE FULL BIOGRAPHY

Filmographyclose complete filmography

DIRECTOR:

1.
  Trap, The (1991) Director

CAST: (feature film)

2.
 Interstate 60 (2003) Cameo Appearance
3.
 Stuart Little 2 (2002) Voice Of Stuart Little
4.
 Atlantis: the Lost Empire (2001) Voice Of Milo James Thatcher
5.
 Stuart Little (1999) Voice Of Stuart Little
6.
 Homeward Bound II: Lost in San Francisco (1996) Voice Of Chance
7.
 Mars Attacks! (1996) Jason Stone
8.
 Frighteners, The (1996) Frank Bannister
9.
 Coldblooded (1995) Tim Alexander
10.
 Blue In The Face (1995) Peter
VIEW THE FULL FILMOGRAPHY

Milestones close milestones

:
Raised in Canada
1976:
Made professional acting debut on the CBC series "Leo and Me"
1979:
TV-movie acting debut, "Letters From Frank" (CBS); encouraged by Art Carney to pursue acting in Los Angeles, CA
:
Added middle initial 'J' to his professional name to distinguish him from the <i>other</i> Michael Fox (a much older character actor)
1980:
Made TV series debut as a regular on "Palmerstown U.S.A." (CBS)
1980:
Made film debut in "Midnight Madness"
1982:
Achieved fame as Alex P Keaton, the conservative elder son of two former hippies on popular NBC sitcom "Family Ties"
1985:
Feature debut in a leading role, playing Marty McFly in Robert Zemeckis' "Back to the Future"
1986:
Directed first short, "The Iceman Hummeth" for "David Letterman's 2nd Annual Holiday Film Festival" (NBC)
1987:
Acted opposite rocker Joan Jett in Paul Schrader's "Light of Day"
1988:
Starred as a young Midwesterner whose NYC life is coming apart at the seams in "Bright Lights, Big City"
1989:
Delivered fine dramatic turn as the conscience-stricken soldier in Brian De Palma's Vietnam drama "Casualties of War"
1989:
Reprised role of Marty McFly in "Back to the Future II" (1989) and "Back to the Future III" (1990), both directed by Zemeckis; also played multiple roles in both sequels
1991:
Made TV directorial debut with an episode of HBO's "Tales From the Crypt"
1992:
Helmed "Rainy Day" episode of "Brooklyn Bridge" (CBS), re-teaming with executive produce and creator Gary David Goldberg, who worked on "Family Ties"
1993:
Provided the voice of Chance (the Bulldog) in "Homeward Bound: The Incredible Journey"
1993:
Played rare supporting turn as a heavy in "Where the River Flows North"
1994:
Portrayed Alex Magee in ABC movie version of Woody Allen's "Don't Drink the Water"
:
Formed Snowback Productions with Matt Tolmach
1995:
Producing debut, "Coldblooded"; also appeared in a cameo
1995:
Delivered dead-on portrayal of advisor to "The American President"
1995:
Appeared in Wayne Wang and Paul Auster's improvizational "Blue in the Face"
1996:
Reprised Chance for "Homeward Bound II: Lost in San Francisco"
1996:
Joined the all-star cast of Tim Burton's "Mars Attacks!"
1996:
Re-teamed with Zemeckis (this time as executive producer) for Peter Jackson directed feature "The Frighteners"
1996:
Returned to series TV playing mayoral aide Michael Flaherty on ABC sitcom "Spin City"; also executive produced; announced plans to leave the show in 2001 to concentrate on raising money and awareness for Parkinson's disease; remained on as an executive producer; won an Emmy for his work as an actor in his final season
1997:
Re-teamed with director Rob Reiner for the musical comedy special "I Am Your Child" (ABC)
1998:
Publicly disclosed his 1991 diagnosis of Parkinson's disease in an interview with <i>People</i> magazine (November); also revealed he underwent brain surgery to alleviate tremors
1999:
Voiced the title character in the feature "Stuart Little"; returned for 2002 sequel "Stuart Little 2"
2001:
Provided the voice for the leading explorer in the Disney animated feature "Atlantis: The Lost Empire"
2002:
Received a star on the Hollywood Walk Of Fame
2003:
Released the bestselling memoir <i>Lucky Man</i>
2003:
Wrote and produced the ABC sitcom pilot "Hench at Home" about a forcibly retired pro hockey player's home life
2004:
Guest starred on "Scrubs" (NBC) as a surgeon with obsessive-compulsive disorder
2006:
Played a business tycoon who suffers from cancer on three episodes of ABC's "Boston Legal"; earned an Emmy nomination
2009:
Guest starred on "Rescue Me" (FX) as Janet's (Andrea Roth) love interest
2009:
Traveled the world and sought out examples of what makes people from different cultures their happiest as host of the one-hour ABC special "Michael J. Fox: Adventures of an Incurable Optimist"
2009:
Earned Grammy nomination in Best Spoken Word category for <i>Always Looking Up</i>
2010:
Earned Grammy nomination for Best Spoken Word for the album <i>A Funny Thing Happened On the Way To The Future...</i>
2011:
Joined cast of CBS' "The Good Wife" as a wily and cynical attorney afflicted with a neurological condition, which he exploits to sway jurors and potential clients
VIEW ALL MILESTONES

Education

Burnaby South Secondary: -

Notes

His official website is www.michaeljfox.com

"When I read the script, I thought of Lewis as Jiminy Cricket, who was Pinocchio's conscience in that fairy tale. Lewis is just that to the President; he's persistent, and he's always in the President's ear." --Michael J. Fox on his character in "The American President" quoted in the publicity material for the film.

"Suddenly, yeah, I had the number-one and number-two movies and the number-two television show in the country. And I had a Ferrari and all the money I could eat, and I had girls and it was really wild. I remember one time we taped an episode of 'Family Ties' and we left the Paramount lot in a limo for some reason, and we were going up Gower from Melrose and took a left on Sunset and went by that big kitschy theater, Cinerama Dome. It was playing 'Back to the Future' and there were lines around the block. I'd had a few beers at this point, so I popped my head out the sunroof and howled or crowed--I don't know what I did--and we got pulled over by a cop ... Then this other cop comes running up ... 'What are you doing? Do you know who that is? That's Michael J. Fox!' I said to myself, 'This is fucking weird. Two years ago, these were the guys who were emptying my beers and ripping my cigarettes apart looking for joints in my car.'" --quoted in Interview, August 1996.

Fox began watching tapes in a hotel room in New Zealand where he was making "The Frighteners": "My [twin] daughters had just been born and I was halfway around the world from my family. I was lonely. People were sending me shows to entertain me. 'Seinfeld', 'Friends', 'Ellen', 'The Larry Sanders Show'. I was watching this stuff, and thinking, 'Wow,' like it was really great. 'David Schwimmer is really kicking ass. Jason Alexander is so good. And Shandling and Rip Torn. This is where things are happening.' And I thought, 'Can I still do that? Yeah. I can. That's what I do. And I want to do it again.'" --Fox to Mary Murphy in TV Guide, September 30, 1996.

"I remember, when we were doing 'Family Ties', we would watch the studio audience. And even in the very beginning, when Michael would be on stage, you could just see the audience lean forward. And when he would exit, they would lean back just a little bit. Clearly he was really intriguing to them, right from the beginning. And that's just the magic, the X factor, that he has.

"When we did the research for the initial pilot of 'Spin City', people in the different focus groups loved it. But what was funny was what they said about his character: About half the people thought he had the best interest of the city at heart, was altruistic, cared about the mayor, cared about everyone, and they loved him. The other half thought he was self-serving, conniving, only out for himself ... and they loved him. It just didn't matter what their take on his character was. They just liked him." --Gary David Goldberg, creator-producer of both "Family Ties" and "Spin City", in Biography Magazine, November 1997.

"What I've learned through having Parkinson's and doing my work and not telling people about it is that whatever I'm perceived to be doing, I'm doing something else. I'm managing a physical situation. It taught me great discipline and an awareness of what I can expect from myself." --Fox to GQ, November 1999.

"Parkinson's isn't a big thing in my house. It hasen't impacted the kids. Our family is very normal. Tracy makes fun of me. The kids are all smart-asses. They all have a sense of humor. Someone will ask if their daddy is okay, and they'll say, 'Yeah, but he's a pain in the ass today'"---Fox to People April 12, 2004

Companions close complete companion listing

companion:
Nancy McKeon. Actor. Dated briefly in the 1980s.
wife:
Tracy Pollan. Actor. Born on June 22, 1960; married on July 17, 1988 in Vermont; worked together on "Family Ties" and in the film "Bright Lights, Big City" (1988); also appeared with Fox in 1997 episode of "Spin City" as an old girlfriend.

Family close complete family listing

father:
Bill Fox. Canadian Army officer. Died of a heart attack in 1990.
mother:
Phyllis Fox. Payroll clerk. Showing no favoritism, she placed his first Emmy in the same family trophy case with bowling and bridge trophies.
son:
Sam Michael Fox. Born on May 30, 1989; mother, Tracy Pollan.
daughter:
Aquinnah Kathleen Fox. Twin; born on February 15, 1995; mother, Tracy Pollan; name is a Native American word meaning "beautiful colors by the sea".
daughter:
Schuyler Frances Fox. Twin; born on February 15, 1995; mother, Tracy Pollan.
daughter:
Esme Annabelle Fox. Born on November 3, 2001; mother, Tracy Pollan.
VIEW COMPLETE FAMILY LISTING

Bibliography close complete biography

"Lucky Man: A Memoir" Hyperion

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