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he Moon" and "Everybody Hurts," the band also failed to tour behind the record, as had been the case with Out of Time. Though the exhausting Green tour was given for their reluctance to return to the road, rumors circulated that the tours had been canceled due to Stipe, whose gaunt, tonsorially clean look was reportedly due to HIV, which the band was forced to combat in the press.In 1993, R.E.M. began work on Monster, their first "rock" record since Green. The record was plagued by a number of problems, including the tragic deaths of Stipe¿s close friends River Phoenix and Kurt Cobain within months of each other, and Berry and Mills¿ illnesses. The constant delays put the record behind schedule, which exacerbated growing tensions within the group; by the time the album was in its final mixing stage, the individual members were no longer speaking to one another. Monster proved to be another major hit for the band, generating three Top 40 hits, including the glam-influenced "What¿s the Frequency, Kenneth?" But the troubles that had surfaced during the recording of the album appeared to follow them once R.E.M. set out for their first tour in six years. On March 1, 1995, Berry collapsed on stage from a...

he Moon" and "Everybody Hurts," the band also failed to tour behind the record, as had been the case with Out of Time. Though the exhausting Green tour was given for their reluctance to return to the road, rumors circulated that the tours had been canceled due to Stipe, whose gaunt, tonsorially clean look was reportedly due to HIV, which the band was forced to combat in the press.

In 1993, R.E.M. began work on Monster, their first "rock" record since Green. The record was plagued by a number of problems, including the tragic deaths of Stipe¿s close friends River Phoenix and Kurt Cobain within months of each other, and Berry and Mills¿ illnesses. The constant delays put the record behind schedule, which exacerbated growing tensions within the group; by the time the album was in its final mixing stage, the individual members were no longer speaking to one another. Monster proved to be another major hit for the band, generating three Top 40 hits, including the glam-influenced "What¿s the Frequency, Kenneth?" But the troubles that had surfaced during the recording of the album appeared to follow them once R.E.M. set out for their first tour in six years. On March 1, 1995, Berry collapsed on stage from a brain aneurysm during a show in Switzerland. Though he soon recovered, the incident was the first of several medical issues suffered by the band during the tour: Mills underwent abdominal surgery in July, while Stipe had an emergency operation to repair a hernia just one month later. Somehow, the tour proved an incredible success, and helped to draw the band together to record material for a new album.

In 1996, R.E.M. renewed their contract with Warner Bros. for a reported $80 million shortly before releasing Adventures in Hi-Fi (1996). Though the new release debuted at No. 2 on the albums chart, it failed to generate any hit singles and quickly descended into the lower depths of the Billboard 200. It ultimately proved to be the band¿s lowest selling album since Document. The band dove into side projects, most notably Stipe¿s film production company, Single Cell Pictures, before reuniting in Hawaii to record demos for a new album. However, Berry announced that he was leaving the group, citing his growing disinterest in the music business. His decision threw the band into chaos as it attempted to re-assert itself as a three-piece band. Recording sessions began again in 1998 with drummer Joey Waronker, but they soon collapsed under the weight of in-fighting between members. An emergency meeting with management soon provided the group with a forum to sort out their issues while completing Up (1998). It proved a dismal failure, selling just 90,000 copies in the United States. R.E.M. then recorded their first soundtrack album for Milos Forman¿s "Man on the Moon," a biopic of the late comedian Andy Kaufman that had taken its title from their song. A new single, "The Great Beyond," underscored the band¿s declining fortunes in their native country by reaching No. 57 on the charts, as well as their growing popularity overseas, where it reached No. 3 on the U.K. charts in 2000.

R.E.M. recorded at a steady clip between 2001 and 2005, though the results, which included 2001¿s Reveal and 2004¿s Around the Sun, fared only moderately well in America. A number of place-marking compilations appeared between album releases prior to their induction into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 1996, where they were feted by Pearl Jam¿s Eddie Vedder and joined onstage by Berry. After releasing their first concert album, R.E.M. Live (2007), the band enjoyed an uptick in their fortunes with Accelerate (2008), their first Top 5 studio album since Monster. Collapse Into Now (2011) followed suit, reaching No. 5 on the albums chart. The record also completed their contract with Warner Bros., which spawned rumors that any subsequent CDs would be self-release. However, R.E.M. announced in 2011 that they were amicably disbanding, surprising longtime fans. The band had discussed ringing down the curtain for several years, but wanted to prove to themselves that they had at least one more great album in them before doing so. With the back-to-back successes of Accelerate and Collapse Into Now, the band decided that the time was right to go their separate ways. A career overview compilation, Part Lies, Part Heart, Part Truth, Part Garbage 1982-2011 was issued in late 2011. Stipe and Mills would take part in a brief promotional tour that served as the final word on the group, as both musicians confirmed that reunion plans were not in the works.

By Paul Gaitanvention and Nick Drake, the album was a decidedly darker effort than their previous efforts, a mood brought on by the label¿s desire for a pop-friendly hit as well as the band¿s exhaustion from endless touring. The recording sessions were so fraught with tension that the group appeared on the verge of breaking up, but the struggle was well worth the effort: Fables became their best-selling album in America to date. Efforts were made to acknowledge the R.E.M.¿s growing presence in the mainstream with its follow-up, Lifes Rich Pageant (1986). Producer Don Gehman, who had overseen several John Mellencamp records, delivered a more polished sounding record, with Stipe¿s vocals more comprehensible than ever before. The change proved beneficial, as the album was their first to achieve gold sales status, while its lead single, the melancholy "Fall on Me," reached the lower end of the Billboard Hot 100.

After releasing an album of unreleased tracks called Dead Letter Office (1987), R.E.M. entered the second phase of their careers with Document (1987), their first million-selling album. Their fan base had grown from a small cult of college radio listeners to mainstream rock radio audiences, which helped to propel the lead single, "The One I Love," into the Top 10. By 1988, no less of an authority than Rolling Stone had declared them "American¿s Best Rock & Roll Band." That same year, R.E.M. severed ties with I.R.S. Records, which subsequently released Eponymous, a best-of collection featuring several alternate versions of their most notable songs. The band signed with Warner Bros., which released Green on Election Day in 1988. The record found the band experimenting with a varied sonic palette, from the upbeat pop of "Stand" to harder-edged rock on "Orange Crush" and "Turn You Inside Out," while eclectic acoustic instrumentation dominated others. Green would surpass all expectations by reaching double platinum status, which spawned the band¿s biggest, most elaborate tour to date.

The Green tour, which brought R.E.M. to stadium crowds for the first time, was a draining experience for the band. An extended hiatus followed its completion, during which Buck, Berry and Mills teamed with Warren Zevon for a one-shot band called Hindu Love Gods. They reconvened with Stipe in 1990 for Out of Time (1991), a quieter affair that hewed closer to the acoustic material on Green. Its Top 5 lead single, "Losing My Religion," propelled the record to the top of the charts upon its release, selling some four million records while netting three Grammy Awards in 1992, including Best Alternative Album. The artistic, somewhat disturbing music video became one the most requested of the year on MTV. A second major hit, the ebullient "Shiny Happy People," featuring Kate Pierson of The B-52¿s, reached No. 10 on the charts. R.E.M. promised a more upbeat effort for the next release, but Automatic for the People (1992) was a decidedly somber affair, driven in part by string arrangements by Led Zeppelin¿s John Paul Jones. Though it repeated the chart success of its predecessor, debuting at No. 1 and producing three Top 40 singles, including "Man on t

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CAST: (feature film)

1.
 Glastonbury (2006)
4.
 25 Years of Punk (2001)
6.
 Stand and Be Counted (2000) Interviewees
7.
9.
 1995 BRIT Awards, The (1995) Honoree (Best International Artist); Performer
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