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Andrew Fleming

Andrew Fleming

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Also Known As: Andy Fleming Died:
Born: Cause of Death:
Birth Place: Profession: director, screenwriter

Biography CLOSE THE FULL BIOGRAPHY

Openly gay 'Generation X' filmmaker Andrew Fleming acquired a reputation as a wunderkind shortly after leaving New York University's prestigious film school. The last of his three award-winning student films there, "P.P.T.," earned him a fellowship at Warner Bros., and he teamed with no less a producer than Gale Ann Hurd ("Terminator" 1984; "Aliens" 1986) for his feature directing and writing debut "Bad Dreams" (1988), a largely ignored psychological horror film. Although some found it stylish in a sort of David Cronenbergian way, many questioned Hurd's involvement in an "entertainment" so clearly celebrating doom and utterly devoid of hope, aimed shamelessly at the teen market. Prior to "Bad Dreams," Fleming's interests had primarily lain in the technical side of filmmaking, but after a hiatus to learn how to write, he resurfaced with his follow-up feature, "Threesome" (1994), an amusing coming-of-age college story. Boasting an attractive young cast (Lara Flynn Boyle, Stephen Baldwin and Josh Charles) caught up in a somewhat unconventional love triangle, the movie outstandingly and believably expressed the sex-saturated state-of-mind of 20-year-olds and represented a giant leap forward for the...

Openly gay 'Generation X' filmmaker Andrew Fleming acquired a reputation as a wunderkind shortly after leaving New York University's prestigious film school. The last of his three award-winning student films there, "P.P.T.," earned him a fellowship at Warner Bros., and he teamed with no less a producer than Gale Ann Hurd ("Terminator" 1984; "Aliens" 1986) for his feature directing and writing debut "Bad Dreams" (1988), a largely ignored psychological horror film. Although some found it stylish in a sort of David Cronenbergian way, many questioned Hurd's involvement in an "entertainment" so clearly celebrating doom and utterly devoid of hope, aimed shamelessly at the teen market.

Prior to "Bad Dreams," Fleming's interests had primarily lain in the technical side of filmmaking, but after a hiatus to learn how to write, he resurfaced with his follow-up feature, "Threesome" (1994), an amusing coming-of-age college story. Boasting an attractive young cast (Lara Flynn Boyle, Stephen Baldwin and Josh Charles) caught up in a somewhat unconventional love triangle, the movie outstandingly and believably expressed the sex-saturated state-of-mind of 20-year-olds and represented a giant leap forward for the screenwriter. Solid tech contributions gave the independent feature the polished look of a bigger budget studio effort.

The refreshingly unpretentious writer-director "nailed" the high school experience for "The Craft" (1996), a supernatural thriller and black-comedy clone of "Heathers" (1989), featuring four toothsome "witches" (Fairuza Balk, Robin Tunney, Neve Campbell, Rachel True) grounded in a realistic setting. Fleming's ship ran aground when it abdicated its strong narrative in favor of well-executed special effects, culminating in a showdown battle between Balk (in full-blown punk Medusa frenzy) and Tunney, the recent convert with a conscience. He continued in the high school milieu with "Dick" (1999), a period piece bringing two teenagers in contact with such Watergate era characters as President Nixon (Dan Hedaya), James Dean (Jim Breuer) and G. Gordon Liddy (Harry Shearer), among others.

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Filmographyclose complete filmography

DIRECTOR:

1.
  Ideal Home (2018)
2.
  Barefoot (2014)
3.
  Hamlet 2 (2008)
4.
  Nancy Drew (2007)
5.
  In-Laws, The (2003) Director
6.
  Dick (1999) Director
7.
  Craft, The (1996) Director
8.
  Threesome (1994) Director
9.
  Bad Dreams (1988) Director

CAST: (feature film)

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Milestones close milestones

2007:
Directed Emma Roberts in "Nancy Drew" a film based on the popular series of mystery novels about the titular teen detective
2000:
Directed episodes of the short-lived WB series, "Grosse Pointe"
:
Awarded a fellowship to Warner Bros. for directing the short film "P.P.T"; film featured Bridget Fonda
1999:
Helmed the satirical comedy "Dick," starring Michelle Williams and Kirsten Dunst
1994:
Co-scripted and directed "Threesome," a triangular relationship comedy-drama set on a collge campus
1996:
Directed and co-wrote "The Craft," about a group of outcast teenage girls who practice witchcraft
2002:
Helmed the the comedy, "The In-Laws" co-starring Michael Douglas and Albert Brooks
:
Won NYU's Best Film Award for directing the short film "In the Dark"
2008:
Co-screenwriter and director of "Hamlet 2"; premiered at the Sundance Film Festival
1988:
Feature co-writing and directing debut, "Bad Dreams"
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Education

New York University: New York, New York - 1984

Notes

"When I was young, my father was a talent agent who represented directors. It did not look like a good life to me--directors are divorced, alcoholic, not a happy bunch. So I never envisioned being a director as some glamorous job; you're a mess, you never have time to bathe, you smell--it's the worst." --Fleming to Movieline, March 1995.

"Well, when somebody came up to me to say, '"Threesome" is my favorite movie ever,' I said, 'You know if that's true, you really need to see a few more movies.'" --Andrew Fleming quoted in Movieline, March 1995.

About "The Craft": "It just seemed like a nice, new way to offend people. I didn't really know anything about witchcraft when we started, but we had a witch technical consultant, and I learned. It's really in no way more preverse than Catholicism is, and makes as much or more sense because it's grounded in worshipping the earth. It has a lot more to do with day-to-day life than nailing somebody to the cross, to be perfectly honest." --Fleming quoted in Out, March 1996.

"I sometimes amaze myself how bitchy I can be." --Andrew Fleming in Out, March 1996.

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