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Robert Fiske

Robert Fiske

  • Gentleman Jim (1942) August 12 (ET) - Reminder REMINDER
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COMPLETE FILMOGRAPHY WITH SYNOPSIS

Cast (feature film)

2.
Twelve O'Clock High (1949) as Officer
The head of a World War II bomber squadron cracks under the pressure.
3.
Cyclone Prairie Rangers (1944) as Emil Weber, also known as Ed Wayne
It's World War 2 and saboteurs are out to destroy the ranchers food crop. Steve Travis and sidekick Cannonball have been called in to investigate. Avoiding the attempts on his life by the gang, Steve uses a pair of eyeglasses to discover their leader, a supposedly deaf mute shoe repairman.
4.
The Texas Kid (1943) as Naylor
Marshals Nevada and Sandy are after Scully and his gang who have been robbing stage-coaches. The Texas Kid is part of the gang and Sandy thinks he is bad but Nevada knows him and thinks he may be good.
5.
Batman (1943)
In his first screen appearance, the Caped Crusader of Gotham City (belying the lethargic facade of his alter ego Bruce Wayne) battles Dr. Daka, Japanese mastermind of a wartime espionage-sabotage group. Daka has a radium-powered death ray that pulverizes walls, a classic alligator pit to dispose of enemies, and can turn men into electronic zombies who do his bidding and transmit video signals to Daka's lab! Batman has no Batmobile, but there are bats in the Bat Cave...
6.
Dead Man's Gulch (1943) as James P. Westfall
When the Pony Express disbands, riders Tennessee and Johnny head for Adobe Wells. Tennessee becomes the Deputy Marshal while Johnny joins an outlaw gang. It's not long before Tennessee catches Johny attempting murder. As Johhnny is his best friend, he gives him another chance. But to no avail as Johnny murders a man and this time Tennessee must do his duty.
7.
Black Dragons (1942) as Ryder
A cabal of American industrialists, all fifth-columnists intent on sabotaging the war effort, are methodically murdered by the malevolent Monsieur Colomb. It is only until detective Dick Martin is assigned to the case that everyone's true motives and identities are revealed.
8.
Riders of the Northland (1942) as Mr. Strong
9.
A Tragedy at Midnight (1942) as Doctor
This Republic murder mystery starts with a radio broadcast by Greg Sherman (John Howard) who solves cases on the air that the local police cannot solve. As he names the perpetrator of a recent murder we see the criminal, who is listening to the show, become alarmed and start to make his escape. The scene shifts to the police department where the chief, fearing for his job, assigns officers to get something, anything, on Sherman and get him off the air. Meanwhile, Greg and his pretty wife Beth (Margaret Lindsay) are parting company. He's going to a party and she's going to visit her pregnant sister in the hospital. The next morning Greg wakes up and nudges his sleeping wife. When she doesn't respond, he pulls off the covers and finds not his wife but a strange woman, dead and with the murder knife still sticking up out of her back. While he's still recovering from the shock, Beth walks into the bedroom. Thinking that she has discovered her husband with another woman, she leaves and calls the police. The police are delighted of course, but Greg escapes as they are arresting him. Now he must solve the mystery by himself...
10.
Gentleman Jim (1942) as Telegrapher
Fanciful biography of 19th-century boxing champion Jim Corbett.
11.
Today I Hang (1942) as Detective Johnson
Henry Courtney, a wealthy importer is found murdered and the famous DeNormand necklace has been stolen. The false testimony of two witnesses, Rand and Hobbs, puts Jim O'Brien in the shadow of the hangman's noose. Martha Courtney, widow of the murdered man and Jim's former sweetheart is convinced he isn't guilty, and promises crooked lawyer Roger Lanning the necklace - which Jim doesn't have - if he can arrange for Jim's escape. Rand and Lanning killed Courtney, but Lanning doesn't know that Rand has the necklace.
12.
Vengeance of the West (1942) as Gil Kirby
The last entry in Columbia's series co-starring Bill Elliott and Tex Ritter (who departed for the corrals at Republic and Universal), and a remake of 1931's "The Avenger" with Buck Jones: Joaquin Murietta (Bill Elliott)is robbed of his property by Jeff Gorman (Dick Curtis) and town banker Gil Kirby (Robert Fiske) and seeks revenge by disguising himself as a masked bandit, known as The Grey Shadow,and begins to raid gold shipments intended for Gorman and Kirby. Anita Morrell (Adele Mara) arrives in town and is shocked to learn that her father has been murdered. California Ranger Tex Lake (Tex Ritter) investigates and finds clues, planted by Gorman and Kirby,implicating Murietta. Kirby, the real killer, demands $2,000 from Anita in return for the deed to her father's gold mine.Murietta comes to her, denies any involvement in the killing, and gives her the needed money. Lake is on Murietta's trail, but the two are soon united in a fight against the outlaws.
13.
Along the Rio Grande (1941) as Doc Randall
Two cowboys go undercover to catch a rustler on his way to Mexico.
14.
Green Archer, The (1941)
Columbia's 12th serial of 57 total (following 1940's "Deadwood Dick" and ahead of 1941's "White Eagle") is another of director's James Horne's "classics" where he evidently figured that the same reactions that served him well in Laurel and Hardy films would work well in action serials where he has all hands, heroes and villains alike, doing some kind of over-the top "take", no matter the situation. This loose adaptation of an Edgar Wallace story finds Michael Bellamy (Kenne Duncan in his Kenneth Duncan period) inheriting Garr Castle, but his brother, Abel Bellamy (James Craven, as usual making Oil-Can Harry look smooth), has him imprisoned unjustly and moves into the castle himself. When Michael's wife, Elaine Bellamy (Dorothy Fay), fails to return after visiting Abel, her sister Valerie Howett (Iris Meredith), accompanied by their father, Parker Howett (Forrest Taylor) and private detective Spike Holland (Victor Jory, who even when playing the lead hero gets a villain's name), rent an adjoining estate, determined to investigate the case. Abel is afraid they will discover his association with a gang of jewel thieves and desperately - with Horne directing and Craven emoting, desperate is the only word - tries to have them all killed, and anybody else that might be standing around wondering how ten henchmen could fit in a six-passenger car. Each attempt is thwarted by the sudden appearance of the mysterious Green Archer, who is always there with his deadly bow and arrows whenever needed. It takes Abel most of the 15 chapters before he succeeds in capturing Spike, Valerie and Mr. Howett, but the shadow of the Green Archer's feathered Robin-Hood cap is on one of the walls of Garr Castle, and moving in.
15.
The Big Boss (1941) as George Fellows
17.
The Apache Kid (1941) as Joe Walker
Remade, with only slight revisions in names and relationships, in 1953 as "Old Overland Trail" with Rex Allen, "The Apache Kid" has Pete Dawson (Don 'Red' Barry) leading a group of friends and neighbors westward from a dust-ravished Missouri to settle Rock Creek, a frontier town in the Oregon territory. Pete has been induced to make this move by his uncle, Joe Walker (Robert Fiske), who ran afoul of the law twenty years past, but is presumably now a honest citizen. In reality, he is the same crook he was in the past. He and his partner, Nick Barter (Leroy Mason), obtain a government contract to build a road through the territory and are exploiting the settlers and forcing them to work on the road gang for little or no pay, through the use of script money they issue. The purpose for luring Pete and his friends is to obtain more labor. Walker has his henchmen, disguised as Indians, raid the wagon train, stampede the stock and destroy the supply wagon, and the distitute group reaches Rock Creek and are dependent on Walker's dubious largesse in giving them jobs on his road gang. When government funds to pay the workers comes through, Walker has his gang hold up the gold-carrying coach, and forces the laborers to accept script redeemable at one-fourth of its face value. Pete becomes aware of what is happening, so when the next payroll shipment comes through he holds up the coach himself before Walker's henchmen have a chance to, and sends the money into town to the sheriff (Monte Montague), so that the workers will be paid in real money. He continues this procedure week after week and Walker posts a huge reward for the bandit whom he calls "The Apache Kid." Pete places the true facts before the United States Road Commissioner (Forbes Murray), who helps him depose the Walker-Barter regime. Pete marries Barbara Taylor (Lynn Merrick), daughter of one of the immigrants (John Elliott.)
18.
Law and Order (1940) as Deal
Bill Ralston arrives in town planning to settle down but quickly gets caught up in the fight between the townspeople and Poe Daggett and his gang. He takes the job of town Marshal and soon brings law and order. When Daggetts men ambush him he kills Poe's brother. Poe then kills Bill's friend Brant and this leads to the showdown.
19.
East Side Kids (1940) as Cornwall
A street tough searches for evidence to get his brother out of prison.
20.
Carolina Moon (1940) as Barrett
21.
Texas Terrors (1940) as Barker
22.
Passport to Alcatraz (1940) as Reed
George Hollister (Jack Holt), crack investigator for the NYC police, is assigned to run down the enemy aliens who dynamited a Detroit munitions plant. The trail takes him to a customs inspector who is known to have honored fake passports provided by Leon Fenten (C. Henry Gordon), chief henchman of Drexel Stuyvesant (Clay Clement) who heads the sabotage ring. Aided by his partner Ray Nolan (Noah Beery Jr). Hollister arrests an agent named Reed (Robert Fiske) and takes his place using the fake passport. As Reed, he is met by Karol Roy (Cecilia Callejo), an innocent assistant, who takes him to Fenten. Working undercover, Hollister is still unable to learn the name of the head man, not even from dumb gang-member Hank Kircher (Maxie Rosenbloom). Stuyvesant warns Fenten of his suspicions about "Reed" and the latter gives Hollister an assignment as a test.
23.
Before I Hang (1940) as District Attorney
A mad scientist experiments with a serum tainted with a psychopath's blood.
24.
Deadwood Dick (1940)
Columbia's 11th serial (between "Terry and the Pirates" and "The Green Archer") and the first western serial that James W. Horne solo-directed. The standard one-man-to-a-hoss and nobody walks rule of Westerns tended to cramp Horne's usual style of directing, in that he wasn't able to pour six or seven henchies into a four-door sedan and have them come tumbling out like the clowns at a circus, and the suprise with those familiar with his serials is that he didn't have all the henchmen riding around in a stagecoach or wagon. And, since they usually stayed on their horse, he was unable to have them rounding a corner on foot at an angle, freeze in surprise with their arms thrust over their heads, do a couple of takes and hot-foot it stage left for an alarmed feet-do-your-stuff exit. The character of "Deadwood Dick" in this serial is just a name that had a ring to it, was not intended to be based on the real-life "Deadwood Dick" in any manner, and those who delight in pointing out that the real "Deadwood Dick" was a black man and Columbia didn't know what they were doing miss an obvious point; the Columbia writers most likely knew that, but they weren't writing a factual history of the West and their fictional character could be what they wanted him to be. And was. That he ended up being played by the dullest actor (Don Douglas) ever to essay the lead role in a serial (at least until Republic came up with the likes of Bill Henry and Harry Lauter as serial leads) probably wasn't something they planned. This one had a little promise with veteran western actor Lane Chandler as "Wild Bill Hickok" but that promise soon faded with Hickok's demise in chapter one of this 15-chapter serial, where a renegade band led by a mysterious, masked character known as "The Skull" is terrorizing the town of Deadwood in the territory of Dakota. Dick Stanley (Don Douglas), editor of the Dakota Pioneer Press and a leading member of the Statehood For Dakota committee, is, unknown to his fellow townsmen and committee members, the equally mysterious Deadwood Dick, who is fighting The Skull and his gang. This makes everything about even as, unknown to Stanley, fellow-committeeman banker Transon Drew (Ed Cassidy) is The Skull. Well, actually, The Skull is a bit ahead as his "speaking voice" in costume is that of Forrest Taylor, who is nowhere in sight among the suspected citizens. Frank Butler, Stanley's "star' reporter is killed when he discovers that The Skull has plans to build an mpire of his own, and this also raises the possibility that Butler's sister, Anne (Lorna Gray), is also in danger. Chapter One ends with Deadwood Dick involved in a fight on a railroad handcar (filled with dynamite, naturally) with Jack McCall (Karl Hackett), the slayer of Wild Bill Hickok (Lane Chandler), and the handcar crashes to the bottom of a deep gorge and crashes...and explodes. Stanley/Deadwood Dick faces 13 more cliffhangers (mainly because he keeps letting Drew in on his plans to capture The Skull),before he unmasks The Skull in Chapter 15, "The Deadwood Express," Most of the action footage involving the Deadwood Dick character shows up again in 1954's "Riding With Buffalo Bill", where Marshall Reed as Buffalo Bill sans goatee, rides around in Deadwood Dick's costume.
25.
Shadow, The (1940)
Columbia's 9th serial, slotted between "Overland With Kit Carson" and "Terry and the Pirates", was intended to have Lorna Gray in the role played by Veda Ann Borg, and to have been co-directed by D. Ross Lederman and Norman Deming. The credits specified the serial was "Based upon stories published in "The Shadow Magazine", while the ads proclaimed it to be "right out of the air waves and magazine stories." What appeared was a mixture of both with Lamont Cranston the true identity of The Shadow, although Lamont Cranston was only an occasional disguise of the pulp magazine Shadow. The hypnotic invisibility of the radio character was completely ignored, as was the almost invisible "Living Shadow" of the pulps.(In the serial, the only invisible man (The Black Tiger) was the villain, as even James Horne probably realized that six to ten henchmen taking orders from an invisible man was more plausible then six to ten henchman falling all over the place from unseen blows delivered by an invisible hero. Actually, based on how he directed serials, Horne would have most likely been in favor of henchies Charles King and Kit Guard exchanging punches with thin air.) Margot Lane (Veda Ann Borg) was a radio-only character until 1941 when she was picked up by the magazine and also the comic books. Police Commissioner Weston (Frank LaRue) and Inspector Cardona (Edward Peil) were characters who had appeared both in the radio series and the magazine, while Harry Vincent (Roger Moore II), used here as The Shadow and Cranston's chauffeur, general assistant and gofer, was from the pulp stories. Anybody watching the serial and expecting to hear Jory ask "who knows what evil lurks in the hearts of men" had best bring a sack lunch and prepare for a long wait. The best line in the film, both in delivery and circumstances, comes when head henchie Flint (Jack Ingram) advises his hapless,clueless but always-game cohorts that "The Black Tiger IS REALLY mad this time." Horne utilized Richard Cramer, from Horne's Laurel and Hardy days, as the "voice" of The Black Tiger, and Cramer read it with over-the-top ripeness from beginning to end, and one almost expects assistant-head henchie Williams (Eddie Fetherston) to ask Flint how he could discern any degree of difference in the Black Tiger's attitude. That said, the plot begins with dynamited railroads, wrecked airplanes and blown-up industrial plants, with the clear message that nothing is safe from the machinations of the secret mastermind of the underworld known only as The Black Tiger. The man has plans to take over everything. While the police make only a few futile arrests, Lamont Cranston,noted scientist and criminologist, assumes the guise of a black-garbed, masked figure (The Shadow) to combat this evil. The police,of course, assume that The Shadow and The Black Tiger are one and the same. Cranston works with Police Commissioner Weston and a group of solid citizen businessmen including Joseph Rand (Charles K. French), Gilbert Hill (Gordon Hart), Stanford Marshall (Robert Fiske), Turner (J. Paul Jones) and Stephen Prescott (Griff Barnett), and somewhere in nearly every chapter Cranston, Weston, Cardona and these solid citizens gather at The Cobalt Club and Cranston brings them up to date on the next steps to rid the city of The Black Tiger. Since one of the solid citizens is actually The Black Tiger, these meetings, for the most part, are counter-productive.
26.
The Thundering West (1939) as Harper
27.
The Man from Sundown (1939) as Capt. Prescott
28.
Society Lawyer (1939) as Lefty
A lawyer plays with fire when he gets mixed up with underworld types.
29.
Timber Stampede (1939) as Matt Chaflin
Cattlemen fight corrupt railroad men out to destroy the forest.
30.
31.
The Mystic Circle Murder (1939) as The Great LaGagge
32.
Racketeers of the Range (1939) as Roger Whitlock
Gangsters take up rustling in the wild West.
33.
Cassidy of Bar 20 (1938) as Clay Allison
Against a background of exceptional mountain photography, Hoppy rushes to rid former sweetheart Nora Blake and Pappy's range of rustlers and bad guys.
34.
Sunset Trail (1938) as Monte Keller
Keller buys Marsh's cattle and then murders him to retrieve the money. But Ann Marsh remembered some of the serial numbers and this is the clue that Hoppy needs. He arrives posing as a dude. He also poses as a novice poker player and this brings in a few of the stolen bills. When he realizes Keller is the one he is after, he wins back all the money at the poker table. He escapes from Keller's saloon but Keller and his men head out after him.
35.
The Purple Vigilantes (1938) as Drake
David Ross organizes the ranchers into a vigilante group to rid the town of outlaws. The plan succeeds but the trouble starts when some of the men form a new vigilante group and posing as the original one plunder for loot.
36.
Test Pilot (1938) as Attendant
An irresponsible test pilot's wife and best friend try to get him to grow up.
37.
The Lady Objects (1938) as Mr. Horn
38.
Smashing the Spy Ring (1938) as Lieutenant General
39.
Adventure in Sahara (1938) as Lieutenant Dumond
Agadez is a lonely French outpost baking under the desert sun and commanded by the cruel and oppressive Captain Savatt (C. Henry Gordon.) To it comes, at his own request, Legionnaire Jim Wilson (Paul Kelly) soon followed by his fiancee, Carla Preston (Lorna Gray), who has been tracing him from post to post. Legionnaires seize the fort and turn Savitt loose in the Arab-haunted desert with only a fraction of the water and food needed to get back to civilization. But Savitt gets through and returns to the fort at the head of an avenging troop of men. But Arabs surround Savitt and his men, and the mutineers, knowing that to leave the fort and aid them means their own death...
40.
Numbered Woman (1938) as Ferguson
41.
West of the Santa Fe (1938) as Frank Parker
42.
Flight into Nowhere (1938) as Dr. Butler
43.
I Am a Criminal (1938) as Attorney [Phil] Collins
44.
The Colorado Trail (1938) as Deacon Webster
45.
South of Arizona (1938) as Mark Kenyon
46.
Raw Timber (1937) as Bart Williams
47.
Battle of Greed (1937) as Hammond
When silver is found in Virginia City, Lawyer John Storm leads a group from Indiana west. He soon has to defend them all in court against a company that is after their claims. Fighting a crooked Judge, he gets a mis-trial by telling how much each of the jurors was bribed. Then he gets the Governor to appoint a new Judge. But just as the retrial opens, the Judge learns his daughter has been kidnaped.
48.
Roaring Six Guns (1937) as Jake Harmon
49.
The Devil's Playground (1937) as Officer
50.
Old Louisiana (1937) as Luke E. Gilmore
51.
Drums of Destiny (1937) as Holston
52.
53.
The Law Commands (1937) as John Abbott
54.
Song of the Gringo (1936) as
A U.S. Marshal poses as an outlaw to find his missing father.
55.
Adventure in Manhattan (1936) as Dario
A hotshot reporter and a temperamental actress clash when he investigates the backer of her latest show.
56.
Missing Girls (1936) as
57.
Grand Jury (1936) as District Attorney
A small town man mounts a civic crusade to bring a local gang of racketeers to justice.
58.
The Sky Parade (1936) as Scotty Allen
59.
The Cowboy Star (1936) as Director
A cowboy movie star retires to Arizona to fight bad guys for real.

Film Production - Main (feature film)

60.
Things We Said Today (1992) as Rigging Grip
Life hasn't been much of a cabaret lately for poor Clem, a not-so-young-anymore, chronically unemployed dreamer. Just ask Ippolita, her disgruntled girlfriend. Then she meets Jo, in whom she discovers a kindred spirit.

Misc. Crew (feature film)

61.
Vertical Limit (2000) as Assistant Production Accountant
Photographer Peter Garrett, an ex-mountain climber who retired from the sport after his father was killed in a climbing accident, finds himself in a challenging position when his sister and her entrepreneurial-minded partner Elliot become trapped in a in a vertical cave atop the perilous K2, the world's second highest mountain. Can Peter find the strength to overcome his emotional blockage to climbing, and if so, does he still have what it takes to scale the mighty mountain to save his sister and her summit crew?

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