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Mike Figgis

Mike Figgis

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Also Known As: Michael Figgis Died:
Born: February 28, 1948 Cause of Death:
Birth Place: Kenya Profession: director, screenwriter, producer, actor, composer, editor, musician, camera operator, music producer, teacher

Biography CLOSE THE FULL BIOGRAPHY

With his roots in experimental theater and music, it is perhaps surprising that Kenyan-born writer-director Mike Figgis started out as such a conventional filmmaker, but his dissatisfaction with the Hollywood studio system eventually led to his true calling as one of the most innovative auteurs working in contemporary cinema. After studying music in London, he became a member of Gas Board, an English rhythm-and-blues band (which also featured a pre-fame Bryan Ferry), and later went on tour for nearly a decade with an experimental theater group The People Show first as a musician, then also as an actor. Undaunted by his unsuccessful application to London's National Film School, Figgis began writing and directing his own stage productions, visually striking works like "Redheugh", "Slow Fade" and "Animals of the City", which combined music with filmed segments and live performance. He developed "Slow Fade" into a one-hour piece ("The House") for Britain's Channel 4, capturing the attention of producer David Puttnam, for whom he wrote a treatment that would become his feature writing-directing debut, "Stormy Monday" (1988)".

With his roots in experimental theater and music, it is perhaps surprising that Kenyan-born writer-director Mike Figgis started out as such a conventional filmmaker, but his dissatisfaction with the Hollywood studio system eventually led to his true calling as one of the most innovative auteurs working in contemporary cinema. After studying music in London, he became a member of Gas Board, an English rhythm-and-blues band (which also featured a pre-fame Bryan Ferry), and later went on tour for nearly a decade with an experimental theater group The People Show first as a musician, then also as an actor. Undaunted by his unsuccessful application to London's National Film School, Figgis began writing and directing his own stage productions, visually striking works like "Redheugh", "Slow Fade" and "Animals of the City", which combined music with filmed segments and live performance. He developed "Slow Fade" into a one-hour piece ("The House") for Britain's Channel 4, capturing the attention of producer David Puttnam, for whom he wrote a treatment that would become his feature writing-directing debut, "Stormy Monday" (1988)".

Filmographyclose complete filmography

DIRECTOR:

3.
4.
  Coma (2005)
5.
  Cold Creek Manor (2003) Director
6.
  Hotel (2001) Director
7.
  Timecode (2000) Director
8.
9.
  Just Dancing Around (1999) Director
10.
  Miss Julie (1999) Director

CAST: (feature film)

3.
 One Night Stand (1997)
4.
 Take a Number (1997) (Cameo Appearance)
5.
 One Night Stand (1997) Hotel Clerk
6.
 Leaving Las Vegas (1995) Mobster No 1
7.
 Internal Affairs (1990) Hollander
VIEW THE FULL FILMOGRAPHY

Milestones close milestones

1957:
Moved to Newcastle, England at the age of eight
:
Performed with R&B group, Gas Board which also included Bryan Ferry
:
Recorded with a band produced by Charlie Watts of the Rolling Stones
:
Toured with experimental theater group, The People Show, in 1970s; joined as a musician but was soon acting
1980:
Left The People Show to concentrate on writing and directing for film and the theater
:
Made 15-minute 16mm short film "Redheugh"; followed with stage productions "Slow Fade" and "Animals of the City" which combined music and film with live action
:
Toured the major European capitals; won various European theatrical awards
:
Commissioned by Channel 4 to write and direct
:
First TV-movie as director, "The House", adapted from the performance piece "Slow Fade"
:
Taught film part-time at London Polytechnic
1988:
Feature writing and directing debut, the jazz-infused noir "Stormy Monday"; also wrote music
1990:
Helmed "Internal Affairs", starring Richard Gere; also co-wrote music, received credit as a musician and acted in film in the part of Hollander
1991:
Directed and wrote screenplay and composed music for the psychological erotic drama "Liebestraum"
1991:
Helmed, scripted and wrote music for "Mara" segment of HBO's "Women & Men II"
1993:
Clashed with producer Ray Stark over the final cut of "Mr. Jones", which reteamed him with Gere; this dark look at mental illness became a love story set in a hospital for the mentally ill, though executives at Tri-Star insisted that the movie was always a love story, that he had failed to follow the script and asked the actors to improvise their lines, and that the ending presented by the director was incoherent, necessitating the studio take over the final editing
1994:
Helmed remake of "The Browning Version"
1995:
Received widespread acclaim and two Oscar nominations for Best Director and Best Adapted Screenplay for "Leaving Las Vegas"; also wrote original score and played Mobster No 1; featured as musician (trumpet and keyboards) on soundtrack
1996:
Executive produced Annette Haywood-Carter's "Foxfire"
1997:
Produced, directed, wrote screenplay and music for "One Night Stand"; also appeared as Hotel Clerk and credited as trumpet player
1998:
Signed an exclusive two-year production deal with Columbia Pictures
1999:
Rejected linear narrative form to tell "The Loss of Sexual Innocence"; directed, scripted, wrote music and played trumpet
1999:
Produced, directed and wrote music for film adaptation of August Strindberg's "Miss Julie"; shot on 16mm in 16 days with two hand-held cameras on one set; used split-screen technique for the love scene, prefiguring his innovative four camera point-of-view in "Time Code"
1999:
Helmed two 50-minute documentaries ("Flamenco Women" and "Just Dancing Around"); screened at NYC's Anthology Film Archives as "Two Dance Videotapes by Mike Figgis"
2000:
Produced, scripted and directed "Time Code", in which four digital video cameras were employed to capture different perspectives; shot in sequence in real time entirely with hand-held cameras over the course of one day; has the distinction of being the first feature filmed in one take (there were several "takes", but what the audience sees is one complete take selected by Figgis as the best); also operated one of the four cameras
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Notes

"I was in pre-production on the film ["Leaving Las Vegas"] when I got a call that John [O'Brien, author of the source material] had committed suicide. Obviously, I was quite upset and considered not making the film, but eventually I decided that John wrote a great book, and the most I could do for him was to go ahead and make the film." --Mike Figgis to the Los Angeles Times, October 29, 1995

On the nightmare of "Mr. Jones": "I've never experienced anything so degrading, so humiliating, so completely lacking in respect. Had it been anywhere but a film studio, people would have been on the floor bleeding." --Figgis quoted in The New York Times, November 1, 1995

"I'm not disgusted with working with Hollywood, just realistic . . . The problem isn't Hollywood or the independent market--it's about how much money you're expecting to earn. There's the potential for a successful director to earn between $1 million and $7 million per film . . . So directors coming out of film schools or commercials or going to Hollywood having made a moderately successful British film have in their minds the mathematical possibility of becoming a very rich person very quickly. It's the oldest temptation in the book. How hard is it to say no to that? How easy is it to delude yourself you're doing good work in the studio system?

"The answer is, why bother? If you want to do good work . . . as the 'Dogma' people have also proved, you can make a film for virtually nothing if you're passionately interested in film-making as opposed to passionately interested in becoming a rich film-maker . . ." --Figgis quoted in Sight and Sound, May 1999

About working in Hollywood: "It was something I was excited to fall into because I was suddenly in a position of such power, and I was suddenly earning such money and meeting world-famous actors on a casual basis. And it feels terribly cool. You start regarding yourself as a very special individual. But then at a certain point you suddenly feel: 'I am so frustrated and bored by this', and you see the British people who have gone there and become so homogenised. And I guess I had a fear of that.

"Hollywood destroys people and ages people and throws them out on a weekly basis." --Figgis quoted in The Guardian, January 8, 2000

"I have a theory that film has replaced religion, because it's projected in temples, basically, and seems the ultimate corruption of a pure religious ideal in that it's about excessive sensuality on a cheap level . . . My hope is that these new [technical] developments will dignify the temple and turn film into an amateur thing. The idea that anyone can make a movie is healthy. You don't have to have a mark from God." --Figgis in The Guardian, January 8, 2000

"I prefer small films and rarely get excited by big expensive films. I feel shut out of big films, as if I am not being asked to participate in the event. It would be true to say that I feel the same about big theatre and big music. There comes a point where you know you are being manipulated by tricks rather than connecting with emotions and ideas and truths. It is much harder to tell the truth to a lot of people than a few. Glenn Gould retreated to the recording studio rather than play the big concert halls. It is a bald fact that bigger means more expensive to produce--as soon as you cross that line, you have to make compromises."

" . . . the biggest problem with studio films is that they are not good enough any more. And the reason they are not good enough is because they cannot trust the individual vision of the film-maker. There is simply too much money at stake. An interesting date is the day 'Fatal Attraction' was tested in front of an invited audience. As a result of the test the ending was re-shot amd the film was a huge hit. This proved . . . whatever the studio wanted it to prove. The theory now is that any film can be fixed by spending money on it. And very few execs will have the courage to back a film that is not right in the middle of the taste-buds of an average audience. It is far simpler to say no to an idea than to say yes to an idea." --Figgis quoted in The Guardian, February 25, 2000

"I never wanted to be an epic filmmaker. I never get jealous when I see hugely extravagant vistas and all that. It's like a different world to me. I like it very, very simple--where all the focus goes into the psychology of the acting." --Figgis to the Chicago Sun-Times, March 6, 2000

Companions close complete companion listing

wife:
Bienchen Figgis. No longer together.
companion:
Saffron Burrows. Actor. Born c. 1973; directed by Figgis in "One Night Stand" (1997), "The Loss of Sexual Innocence" and "Miss Julie" (both 1999) and "Time Code" (2000).

Family close complete family listing

son:
Louis Arlen Figgis. Born c 1975; named after Louis Armstrong and Harold Arlen; Figgis' oldest child; mother, Bienchen Figgis.
son:
Louis Figgis. Born c 1980; also named for Armstrong; mother, Bienchen Figis.

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