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W. C. Fields

W. C. Fields

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Also Known As: Died: December 25, 2046
Born: January 29, 1880 Cause of Death: pneumonia
Birth Place: Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA Profession: Cast ...
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MILESTONES

:
Raised in the Philadelphia area
1898:
Left home just before his 18th birthday and made stage debut peforming in vaudeville in Philadelphia
1898:
Began touring with the Monte Carlo Girls
1899:
NYC debut at Miner's Bowery Theatre (January)
1900:
Solo debut on the Orpheum circuit; began tour in San Francisco
1901:
Embarked on European tour, beginning in Berlin, Germany; later played London and Paris
1902:
Returned to Europe, playing Berlin, Vienna, Prague and London
1903:
Traveled to Australia and then South Africa
1904:
Toured Great Britain; also appeared in France and Italy
1905:
After completing performances in Denmark, Germany and Spain, returned to USA for first time in nearly three years
1905:
Broadway acting debut in "The Ham Tree"; toured with show on and off until 1907
1907:
Resumed vaudeville performances, returning with a juggling act
1908:
Continued to divide time appearing throughout the USA, in Europe, South Africa and Australia
:
Debuted at the Follies Bergere in Paris
1915:
Film acting debut in short, "Pool Sharks"
:
Became a Broadway headliner with the yearly editions of the "Ziegfeld Follies"
1922:
Appeared in Ziegfeld rival George White's "Scandals of 1922"
1923:
Starred as Eustace McGargle on stage in "Poppy"
1924:
Returned to films after nine years; made feature film acting debut in cameo role in "Janice Meredith"
1925:
Starred in "Sally of the Sawdust", directed by D.W. Griffith, a film adaptation of the stage play "Poppy"; recreated stage role of Eustace McGargle
1925:
Began making features for Paramount; first was "That Royle Girl" (no longer extant), directed by Griffith
1925:
Returned to the "Ziegfeld Follies"
1927:
Acted in feature "Running Wild", helmed by Gregory La Cava
1928:
Appeared in Earl Carroll's "Vanities"
1928:
Played the ringmaster in "Tillie's Punctured Romance"
1928:
Last Paramount silent, "Fools for Luck" (no longer extant)
1930:
Made final appearances in vaudeville at the Palace Theater
1930:
First sound film, the RKO short "The Golf Specialist", recreating routine from the "Ziegfeld Follies of 1918"
1930:
Again co-starred in Earl Carroll's "Vanities"
:
Final Broadway performance in "Ballyhoo"
1931:
First sound feature film role, played a barber in "Her Majesty Love"
:
Acted in a series of short films for producer Mack Sennett, including "The Dentist" (1932), "The Fatal Glass of Beer" and "The Pharmacist" (both 1933)
1933:
Radio debut as guest on "California Melodies"
1933:
First film with Baby LeRoy, "Tillie and Gus"
1933:
Cast as Humpty Dumpty in the screen version of "Alice in Wonderland"
1934:
Provided the stories (under pseudonym Charles Bogle) for "The Old Fashioned Way" and ""It's a Gift"
1935:
Delivered sole career dramatic performance playing Mr. Micawber in the George Cukor-directed "David Copperfield"
1935:
Starred in and provided story for "Man on the Flying Trapeze", a loose remake of "Running Wild"
1936:
Again reprised stage role in "Poppy", a remake of "Sally of the Sawdust"
1937:
Co-starred on the NBC radio program "Chase and Sanborn Hour", alongside Edgar Bergen and Charlie McCarthy
1938:
Last film for Paramount, "The Big Broadcast of 1938"
1939:
Reportedly declined to play the title role in "The Wizard of Oz", feeling the film would be a flop
1939:
Signed on at Universal for more than $100,000 per picture; first vehicle, "You Can't Cheat an Honest Man"
1940:
Teamed with Mae West for the comedy "My Little Chickadee"; also credited with co-writing screenplay with West
1940:
Starred in the comedy "The Bank Dick"; wrote screenplay under pseudonym Mahatma Kane Jeeves
1941:
Last starring vehicle, "Never Give A Sucker an Even Break"; also wrote story under pseudonym Otis Criblecoblis
1944:
Recreated his legendary pool routine in the vaudeville-inspired feature "Follow the Boys"
1945:
Made last feature film appearance in "Sensations of 1945"

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