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Also Known As: William Todd Field Died:
Born: February 24, 1964 Cause of Death:
Birth Place: Pomona, California, USA Profession: director, actor, screenwriter, producer, photographer, composer, singer, songwriter, assistant cameraman

Biography CLOSE THE FULL BIOGRAPHY

After becoming an actor capable of delivering quality performances in mainstream and independent fare, multi-talented Todd Field segued into the director's chair to helm Oscar-baiting pictures that propelled the little-known actor into a critically acclaimed filmmaker. Field made his feature debut in Woody Allen's "Radio Days" (1987), after which he struggled to find his footing with a failed sitcom and a starring role in one of Roger Corman's lesser esteemed B-movies. He finally received his onscreen due with a well-reviewed performance in Victor Nunez's "Ruby in Paradise" (1993), only to step away from acting to earn his master's in film from the American Film Institute, where he made several festival-screened shorts. Field returned to acting with projects large and small, logging roles in the indie crime drama "Farmer & Chase" (1995) and the visual effects blockbuster "Twister" (1996). Following a busy year that saw him in "The Haunting" (1999) and "Eyes Wide Shut" (1999), Field made a huge splash with his debut feature as a director, helming the critically acclaimed and multi-award winning drama, "In the Bedroom" (2001). Taking a step back from acting, he moved on to his next film, "Little...

After becoming an actor capable of delivering quality performances in mainstream and independent fare, multi-talented Todd Field segued into the director's chair to helm Oscar-baiting pictures that propelled the little-known actor into a critically acclaimed filmmaker. Field made his feature debut in Woody Allen's "Radio Days" (1987), after which he struggled to find his footing with a failed sitcom and a starring role in one of Roger Corman's lesser esteemed B-movies. He finally received his onscreen due with a well-reviewed performance in Victor Nunez's "Ruby in Paradise" (1993), only to step away from acting to earn his master's in film from the American Film Institute, where he made several festival-screened shorts. Field returned to acting with projects large and small, logging roles in the indie crime drama "Farmer & Chase" (1995) and the visual effects blockbuster "Twister" (1996). Following a busy year that saw him in "The Haunting" (1999) and "Eyes Wide Shut" (1999), Field made a huge splash with his debut feature as a director, helming the critically acclaimed and multi-award winning drama, "In the Bedroom" (2001). Taking a step back from acting, he moved on to his next film, "Little Children" (2006), a well-written and superbly acted film that further cemented Field as one of the more literate and engaging filmmakers working in Hollywood.

Born on Feb. 24, 1964 in Pomona, CA, Field was raised in Portland, OR from the age of two when his father, a truck driver, moved the family north after taking a job as a traveling salesman hocking welding supplies, while his mother worked as a librarian. Frustrated as a poet and sad to see the misery of his father, Field moved to New York, determined not to duplicate his father's Willy Loman-like lifestyle. Field hustled as best he could to land acting work, digging into dumpsters for yesterday's call sheets and going on auditions under the auspices of fictitious management companies. After making his television acting debut with a guest spot on "Head of the Class" (ABC, 1986-1991), Field landed his first feature with Woody Allen's nostalgic "Radio Days" (1987). The young performer soon segued to television series regular, playing an incompetent public relations maven on the short-lived sitcom "Take Five" (CBS, 1987). Following such forgettable films like the teen sex comedy, "The Allnighter" (1987) Field had his first major part as an overworked medical student alongside future production partner Matthew Modine in "Gross Anatomy" (1989).

Another small turn in "Fat Man and Little Boy" (1989) led Field to join the down-and-dirty world of B-movies like "Full Fathom Five" (1990), a Roger Corman-produced "Red October" (1990) rip-off directed by Carl Franklin, before enjoying a better showcase in "Back to Back" (1990), playing a mentally handicapped man partnered with his lawyer brother (Bill Paxton) in an effort to clear their father's name. He had the good fortune of hooking up with Victor Nunez for the director's award-winning character study "Ruby in Paradise" (1993), playing the literate nurseryman and major love interest of Ashley Judd's title character, which led to great reviews and seemingly poised the actor for bigger and better things. Instead, Field took time off to study directing at the American Film Institute, where he made several short films including "Too Romantic" (1992); the Sundance-screened "Smoking" (1993), which he co-directed with Matthew Modine; "Delivering" (1993); When I Was a Boy" (1993) and "Nonnie and Alex" (1995), which earned an honorable mention at that year's Sundance Film Festival.

Resuming his acting career, Field was cast alongside offscreen pal Eric Stoltz in "Sleep With Me" (1994), playing a politically incorrect guy who says exactly what he wants. He next offered a fine turn as the petty thief son of a big-time criminal (Ben Gazzara) in the moderately well-received "Farmer & Chase" (1995), while enjoying wider appeal with an appearance in the blockbuster "Twister" (1996), his first collaboration with director Jan De Bont. While "Twister" reached a large audience despite taking a critical drubbing, Field was better suited for Nicole Holofcener's directing debut, "Walking and Talking" (1996), in which he portrayed Anne Heche's nervous fiancé. While searching for the right project with which to make his feature directorial debut, Field remained busy in front of the cameras, landing a small role in De Bont's disappointing "The Haunting" (1999) before appearing in Stanley Kubrick's salacious swan song "Eyes Wide Shut" (1999). Field fared far better in the edgy independent "Broken Vessels," delivering arguably the best performance of his career as a slow-burning paramedic who thrives in the pressure cooker atmosphere of life behind the wheel of an ambulance, only to see his life spiral out of control from drug abuse. Instead of taking an over-the-top approach, Field chose just the right amount of subtly to add realism to his acclaimed performance.

Field returned to series television as a regular for the second season of the family drama "Once and Again" (ABC, 1999-2002), playing the friend and business partner of a divorced father of two (Billy Campbell) getting back into the dating life after meeting a separated forty-something soccer mom (Sela Ward). Having directed an episode of the show, Field was ready to make his debut as a feature filmmaker. Adapting a short story by Andre Dubus, Field co-wrote and directed the haunting, visually appealing and extremely well-acted "In the Bedroom" (2001). The film focused on the after-effects of the tragic death of a young college student (Nick Stahl) who decides to forego graduate school in order to be with an older woman (Marisa Tomei). But when the woman's abusive husband (William Mapother) kills the student and gets released on bail, the boy's parents (Sissy Spacek and Tom Wilkinson) come to the hard conclusion that justice will not prevail, leading to taking matters into their own hands. Rich, atmospheric and extremely well acted, "In the Bedroom" held the 2001 Sundance Film Festival audiences captive before earning nearly unanimous praise after its theatrical release. Consumed by numerous awards and nominations, including five nods at the Academy Awards, Field found himself as one of American cinema's most potent new voices.

It was five years before Field directed another movie, with no writing or acting jobs in between, though he did direct episodes of the weird and short-lived "CarnivĂ le" (HBO, 2003-05). In 2004, well after the adulation he received for "In the Bedroom" had simmered down, Field went to work on his next project, "Little Children" (2006), a darkly satiric take on suburban life and the American way, based on the acclaimed novel by Tom Perrotta. The story focused on a stay at home mom, Sarah (Kate Winslett), a pariah among the other moms at the playground who engages in an illicit affair with an ex-jock, Brad (Patrick Wilson). Meanwhile, a depressed Brad rebels against his breadwinner wife (Jennifer Connelly), who wants him to get off his duff and become a big time lawyer. Thrown into the mix is a pedophile (Jackie Earle Haley) recently released from prison and moved into the neighborhood with his mom (Phyllis Somerville), who tries to set him up with a nice girl (Jane Adams). The film earned mostly rave reviews and numerous award nominations, including a Best Adapted Screenplay nod for Field at the Academy Awards. Again, once the fervor died down, Field settled into a semi-reclusive state, neither acting nor directing, though he had several projects in the development pipeline.

VIEW THE FULL BIOGRAPHY

Filmographyclose complete filmography

DIRECTOR:

1.
2.
  In the Bedroom (2001) Director
3.
  Nonnie and Alex (1995) Director

CAST: (feature film)

1.
 New Port South (2001) Walsh
2.
 Eyes Wide Shut (1999) Nick Nightingale
3.
 Haunting, The (1999) Todd Hackett
4.
 Broken Vessels (1998) Jimmy Warzniak
5.
 Walking & Talking (1996) Frank
6.
 Twister (1996) Beltzer
7.
 Farmer and Chase (1995) Chase
8.
 Frank and Jesse (1995)
9.
10.
 Sleep With Me (1994) Duane
VIEW THE FULL FILMOGRAPHY

Milestones close milestones

:
Raised in Portland, Oregon
1986:
TV acting debut as guest on ABC sitcom "Head of the Class"
1987:
Film debut, Woody Allen's "Radio Days"
1987:
TV series debut, the short-lived sitcom "Take Five" (CBS)
1987:
Made TV-movie debut in "Student Exchange" (ABC)
1989:
First feature co-starring role, "Gross Anatomy"; also wrote song for soundtrack; first collaboration with Matthew Modine
1991:
Appeared in unsuccessful pilot, "Lookwell" (NBC)
1993:
Breakthrough screen role as the literate nursery owner in Victor Nunez's "Ruby in Paradise"; nominated for an Independent Spirit Award as Best Supporting Actor; role attracted attention of Stanley Kubrick when casting "Eyes Wide Shut"
:
Formed Mercury Film with Modine
1994:
Directed short film "Nonnie and Alex", which earned an honorable mention at Sundance
1995:
Portrayed Bob Younger in "Frank and Jesse", an HBO movie detailing the exploits of Jesse James and his fellow post-Civil War outlaws; used a real gun from the era, a Colt owned by his father, which the elder Field shipped to him
1996:
Played the affable Frank, the sensitive jewelry maker engaged to Anne Heche's Laura in Nicole Holocener's debut feature "Walking and Talking"
1996:
First film with director Jan De Bont, "Twister"
1998:
Starred as a drug abusing paramedic in "Broken Vessels"; also co-produced and contributed to the soundtrack
1999:
Portrayed musician friend who informs Tom Cruise of an exclusive costume party in Kubrick's last feature "Eyes Wide Shut"
1999:
Reteamed with De Bont for the spooky "The Haunting"; briefly seen as the man who accompanies Liam Neeson's assistant to twon for medical treatment
1999:
Returned to series TV in the ensemble of "Once and Again" (ABC)
2001:
Feature directorial debut, "In the Bedroom"; also co-scripted and was one of the producers; premiered at Sundance
2001:
Had co-starring role in the film "New Port South"
2002:
Landed a two-year, first-look deal with DreamWorks.
2006:
Directed Kate Winslet in "Little Children" a film based on the novel by Tom Perrotta; also co-scripted with Tom Perrotta; received Golden Globe and Oscar nominations for Best Adapted Screenplay
VIEW ALL MILESTONES

Education

AFI Conservatory: - 1992
Center For Advanced Film Studies, American Film Institute: - 1992 - 1995
AFI Conservatory: Los Angeles , California - 1994

Notes

About working with Stanley Kubrick on "Eyes Wide Shut": "For all his technical prowess, for all the gear and gadgets, he understood actors in extraordinary ways. We would sit down and dissect the work. He wasn't afraid of actors. He almost demanded that actors bring something to the table. Everyone's thoughts and opinions were not only encouraged but listened to and explored. Sometimes it worked, sometimes it didn't. By the end of rehearsals, it was like being in a play. The work had a certain grace and sophistication. I'll never forget working with him." --Todd Field to Bernard Weintraub in The New York Times, May 7, 1999.

On his new life as a resident of Owl's Head, Maine: "My neighbors are fishermen. I feel like a satyr among the monks. In L.A., you walk down the street and bump into O.J. In Maine, you walk down the street and bump into Andrew Wyeth. A little different feeling." --Field quoted in Time Out New York, May 13-20, 1999.

"I know that you have to be an egotistical, self-centered, compulsive megalomaniac, but I think that comes with the territory. Emerson said it best. He said if you take out the ego you destory the art. I think that's very true." --Todd Field on directing, quoted in Buzz, September 1994.

"I think it's difficult to know why you do certain things as a writer or as a filmmaker. If something interests you, it's often because you don't really know why it interests you." --Todd Field quoted in Filmmaker, Fall 2001.

Companions close complete companion listing

wife:
Serena Field. Screenwriter.

Family close complete family listing

father-in-law:
Bo Goldman. Screenwriter. Won Oscars for "Melvin and Howard" and "One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest".
sister:
Kelli D Field. Born in July 1966.
daughter:
Alida P Field. Born on December 7, 1987; had small role in "In the Bedroom".
son:
Henry Rathbun Field. Born on June 25, 1993; played Nick Stahl's character as a child in "In the Bedroom".
VIEW COMPLETE FAMILY LISTING

Bibliography close complete biography

"Away: The People of mid-coast Maine"

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