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Dorothy Arzner

Dorothy Arzner

  • Last of Mrs. Cheyney, The (1937) December 01 (ET) - Reminder REMINDER
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Also Known As: Died: October 1, 1979
Born: January 3, 1897 Cause of Death:
Birth Place: San Francisco, California, USA Profession: Director ...
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MILESTONES

:
During WWI, worked as an ambulance driver
1919:
Began career as a stenographer at Famous Players-Lasky Corporation (later Paramount)
:
Trained as an assistant film cutter
1921:
Appointed as chief editor at Realart Studios; cut and edited at least one film per week
1922:
Attracted attention at Paramount for her editing of the Rudolph Valentino vehicle, "Blood and Sand", particularly the bullfight sequence that used stock footage as well as reels of Valentino
1924:
Early screenplay credits included "The Breed of the Border" and "The No-Gun Man"
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When Harry Cohn offered a contract as director at Columbia, B P Schulberg agreed to let her helm a film for Paramount
1927:
Film directorial debut at Paramount with "Fashions for Women"
1928:
Used music and sound effects but no dialogue in "Manhattan Cocktail"
1929:
First talking picture, "The Wild Party", starring Clara Bow
1930:
First collaborations with screenwriter Zoe Akins, "Sarah and Son" and "Anybody's Woman", both starring Ruth Chatterton
1930:
Reportedly offered uncredited directorial assistance to Robert Milton on "Behind the Makeup" and "Charming Sinners"
1932:
Ended full-time affiliation with Paramount Studios; freelanced for the rest of her career
1933:
Helmed "Christopher Strong", starring Katharine Hepburn; also written by Akins
1934:
Hired by Samuel Goldwyn to direct "Nana"
1936:
Directed remake of "Craig's Wife", starring Rosalind Russell
1937:
Was director of "The Bride Wore Red", starring Joan Crawford
1940:
Steered Maureen O'Hara and Lucille Ball in "Dance, Girl, Dance"; film received belated attention in the 1980s and 1990s for its feminist overtones
:
Directed instructional films during WWII
1943:
Made last feature, "First Comes Courage"
1943:
Contracted pneumonia and was an invalid for more than a year
:
Initiated first film classes at the Pasadena Playhouse
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Hired at the suggestion of Joan Crawford (then married to the company's president) to direct more than 50 television commericals for Pepsi Cola in the 1950s
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Taught at UCLA for four years in the 1960s; among students was Francis Ford Coppola
1975:
Feted in a tribute given by the Directors Guild of America

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