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Julian Fellowes

Julian Fellowes

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Also Known As: Died:
Born: August 17, 1949 Cause of Death:
Birth Place: Egypt Profession: actor, screenwriter, producer

Biography CLOSE THE FULL BIOGRAPHY

A theatrically trained actor who became an Academy Award-winning screenwriter, Julian Fellowes enjoyed a prominent career before the camera before stepping behind it to write the Oscar-winning film "Gosford Park" (2001) and creating the multi-award-winning series "Downton Abbey" (BBC/PBS, 2010- ). Prior to both, Fellowes delivered quality performances in "The Bunker" (CBS, 1981) opposite friend Anthony Hopkins, as well as in the biblical miniseries "Peter and Paul" (CBS, 1981) and "The Scarlet Pimpernel" (CBS, 1982). Following more onscreen turns, including in Richard Attenboroughâ¿¿s "Shadowlands" (1993), he made his screenwriting debut with an adaptation of "Little Lord Fauntleroy" (1994), but primarily stayed in front of the camera with "Tomorrow Never Dies" (1997) and as a cast member of the British series "Monarch of the Glen" (BBC, 2000-05). In 2001, Fellowes wrote the Oscar-winning screenplay for Robert Altmanâ¿¿s "Gosford Park" and transitioned more permanently to a behind-the-scenes role. He adapted William Makepeace Thackerayâ¿¿s "Vanity Fair" (2004) and made his directing debut with "Separate Lies" (2005), only to earn his share of deserved criticism for writing the much-maligned Johnny...

A theatrically trained actor who became an Academy Award-winning screenwriter, Julian Fellowes enjoyed a prominent career before the camera before stepping behind it to write the Oscar-winning film "Gosford Park" (2001) and creating the multi-award-winning series "Downton Abbey" (BBC/PBS, 2010- ). Prior to both, Fellowes delivered quality performances in "The Bunker" (CBS, 1981) opposite friend Anthony Hopkins, as well as in the biblical miniseries "Peter and Paul" (CBS, 1981) and "The Scarlet Pimpernel" (CBS, 1982). Following more onscreen turns, including in Richard Attenboroughâ¿¿s "Shadowlands" (1993), he made his screenwriting debut with an adaptation of "Little Lord Fauntleroy" (1994), but primarily stayed in front of the camera with "Tomorrow Never Dies" (1997) and as a cast member of the British series "Monarch of the Glen" (BBC, 2000-05). In 2001, Fellowes wrote the Oscar-winning screenplay for Robert Altmanâ¿¿s "Gosford Park" and transitioned more permanently to a behind-the-scenes role. He adapted William Makepeace Thackerayâ¿¿s "Vanity Fair" (2004) and made his directing debut with "Separate Lies" (2005), only to earn his share of deserved criticism for writing the much-maligned Johnny Depp-Angelina Jolie thriller "The Tourist" (2010). But he recovered nicely by creating the highly-acclaimed series, "Downton Abbey," which won numerous awards, attracted loyal fans around the world, and cemented Fellowesâ¿¿ place as one of Englandâ¿¿s most esteemed talents.

Born on Aug. 17, 1949 in Cairo, Egypt, Fellowes was raised in a privileged home headed by his civil servant father, who worked as a diplomat for the British Foreign Affairs office and was instrumental in restoring Haile Selassie to Ethiopiaâ¿¿s throne during World War II. Growing up on the family estate in Weatherby Place, South Kensington, Fellowes was educated at Ampleforth College before attending the University of Cambridge, where he earned his masterâ¿¿s in English literature and was a member of the famed Footlights theater club. After studying further at the Webber Douglas Academy of Dramatic Art, Fellowes honed his craft appearing on the stage with various repertory companies as well as making the occasional guest appearance on television, including "The Duchess of Duke Street" (1977). Following a turn in the British miniseries "My Son, My Son (BBC, 1979), he headed to Los Angeles and acted in several made-for-television movies, portraying a Nazi to Anthony Hopkins' Hitler in "The Bunker" (CBS, 1981), the Emperor Nero in the biblical miniseries "Peter and Paul" (CBS, 1981), and Prince Regent in "The Scarlet Pimpernel" (CBS, 1982).

Almost right away, however, Fellowes became disenchanted with Southern California and returned to England, where he served as the associate producer on the four-part miniseries "A Married Man" (1984) starring Hopkins. In front of the camera, he had roles in "Florence Nightingale" (1985) and "Baby: Secret of the Lost Legend" (1985), before co-starring in "Fellow Traveler" (HBO, 1989), about the Hollywood blacklist in the 1950s. Fellowes went on to play famed playwright Noel Coward in the Ian Fleming biopic, "Golden Eye" (1990) â¿¿ not to be confused with Pierce Brosnanâ¿¿s debut as James Bond in 1995 â¿¿ before landing supporting roles in "To Be the Best" (1992), "Damage" (1992), "Sharpeâ¿¿s Rifles (1993) with Sean Bean, and Richard Attenboroughâ¿¿s acclaimed drama "Shadowlands" (1993). In 1994, he made his screenwriting debut adapting Frances Hodgson Burnett's novel Little Lord Fauntleroy into an award-winning miniseries that aired in the United States on the Disney Channel the following year. In a rather odd twist, Fellowes was cast as the Minister of Defense in "Tomorrow Never Dies" (1997) and later drew upon his family background to essay the role of a titled nobleman in the British miniseries "Aristocrats" (1999).

Continuing to tap into his aristocratic heritage, Fellowes joined the cast of the series "Monarch of the Glen" (BBC, 2000-05) as the Scottish Earl Kilwillie, a role he played for 23 episodes during the course of its seven series. While appearing on the show, he was hired by director Robert Altman to write the screenplay for "Gosford Park" (2001), a murder mystery set in 1930s England disguised as an upstairs-downstairs study of class division. Featuring an all-star ensemble cast that included Clive Owen, Helen Mirren, Michael Gambon, Kristin Scott Thomas and Maggie Smith, "Gosford Park" was nearly unanimously hailed by critics and won Fellowes the Academy Award for Best Original Screenplay. From there, he adapted William Makepeace Thackerayâ¿¿s "Vanity Fair" (2004) for director Mira Nair and made his own directing debut with the marriage drama, "Separate Lies" (2005), starring Emily Watson and Tom Wilkinson. After scripting "Piccadilly Jim" (2005) and "Young Victoria" (2009), Fellowes directed his second feature, "From Time to Time" (2009), a comic fantasy about a boy (Alex Etel) living in a haunted house during World War II.

Fellowes earned his share of criticism for the critically-maligned Angelina Jolie/Brad Pitt thriller "The Tourist" (2010), but bounced back nicely as the creator and executive producer of "Downton Abbey" (BBC/PBS, 2010- ), an upstairs-downstairs drama in the vein of "Gosford Park" that delved into the lives of the aristocratic Crawley family and their many servants. Featuring a large ensemble cast that included Hugh Bonneville, Michelle Dockery, Elizabeth McGovern and Maggie Smith, "Downton Abbey" started near the turn of the century with the sinking of the Titanic and moved through major events like World War I, the Spanish flu outbreak in 1918, and the Irish War of independence in the 1920s, while dealing with the personal triumphs and travails inside the household. Premiering on the BBC and crossing the Atlantic to air on PBSâ¿¿ "Masterpiece Theater," the show earned massive acclaim as well as big ratings at home and aboard. "Downton" also earned numerous award nominations, including a whopping 16 Emmy Award nods in 2012, making it the most nominated non-U.S. show in Emmy history. Because of its popularity, due in no small part to the Emmy Award-winning performance of Maggie Smith as the tart-tongued Dowager Countess of Grantham, the show was parodied on a number of comedy shows including "Saturday Night Live" (NBC, 1975- ), "Late Night with Jimmy Fallon" (NBC, 2009- ) and "The Colbert Report" (Comedy Central, 2005- ).

By Shawn Dwyer

VIEW THE FULL BIOGRAPHY

Filmographyclose complete filmography

CAST: (feature film)

1.
 Shergar (2008) Chambers
2.
 Place Vendôme (1998) Wajman
3.
 Never Love a Thief (1998) Brother Vincent
4.
 Tomorrow Never Dies (1997) Minister Of Defense
5.
 Regeneration (1997) Timmons
6.
 Jane Eyre (1996) Colonel Dent
7.
 Savage Hearts (1994) The Bishop
8.
 Shadowlands (1993) Desmond Arding
9.
 Damage (1992) Donald Lyndsaymp
10.
 Fellow Traveller (1986) D'Arcy
VIEW THE FULL FILMOGRAPHY

Milestones close milestones

:
Began acting career appearing in repertory theater
1977:
Early TV credit, a guest appearance on the BBC series "The Duchess of Duke Street"
1979:
Appeared in the British miniseries "My Son, My Son" (BBC)
1981:
Moved to Los Angeles
1981:
Debut on American TV, co-starred with Anthony Hopkins in "The Bunker" (CBS)
1981:
Played the Emperor Nero in the CBS miniseries, "Peter and Paul"
1981:
Feature acting debut in "Priest of Love"
1982:
Cast as Prince Regent in the CBS movie, "The Scarlet Pimpernel"
:
Returned to England
:
Established Lionhead Productions with Andrew Morgan
1984:
Associate producer of the syndicated miniseries, "A Married Man"; starred Anthony Hopkins
1989:
Co-starred in the HBO drama, "Fellow Traveller," about the Hollywood blacklist of the 1950s
1990:
Portrayed Noel Coward in "Goldeneye," a syndicated biopic of James Bond creator Ian Fleming
1992:
Appeared in "Damage," starring Jeremy Irons and Juliette Binoche
1993:
Again supported Anthony Hopkins in "Shadowlands"
1994:
Wrote the teleplay adaptation of "Little Lord Fauntleroy"
1995:
Played the mysterious Bishop in the thriller, "Savage Hearts"
1997:
Co-starred as an army officer in "Regeneration"
1997:
Had featured role as the Minister of Defence in the James Bond film, "Tomorrow Never Dies"
1998:
Acted alongside Catherine Denueve in "Place Vendome"
1998:
Produced and scripted a British TV adaptation of Mark Twain's "The Prince and the Pauper"
1999:
Played the upper-class Lord Richmond in the British miniseries "Aristocrats"
2000:
Had recurring role as a Scottish nobleman in the BBC series, "Monarch of the Glen"
2001:
Feature screenwriting debut, "Gosford Park"; also served as an associate producer
2004:
Penned the screenplay adaptation of William Makepeace Thackeray's "Vanity Fair"; directed by Mira Nair
2005:
Made directorial debut with "Separate Lies," a drama starring Emily Watson and Tom Wilkinson
2009:
Wrote the screenplay for "The Young Victoria," starring Emily Blunt
VIEW ALL MILESTONES

Education

Ampleforth College: -
University of Cambridge: Cambridge , England -

Notes

Among his ancestors are Sir James Fellowes, Physician to the Forces under King George III, and Rear Admiral Sir Thomas Fellowes, who served with Lord Nelson.

"The upper classes pride themselves on never talking about money, but they never think of anything else. That is always the wolf that is nipping behind them.

I'm also always interested by the semi-prostitution of extremely intelligent women who marry a high-status man much stupider than they are. I know several and I always long to ask: having married this dolt in order to acquire a coronet, are there moments, when they spend all that time alone with them, that they regret it?

... I can never decide whether class is a preserver of worthwhile traditions, or a hideous practical joke. But why should stupid, unimaginative people think they are of a higher sort than clever or interesting people, on the basis of their birth." --Fellowes quoted in The Daily Telegraph, January 22. 2002.

"Julian doesn't have the look of a matinee or leading actor. He looks like a character actor." --"Monarch of the Glen" co-star Richard Briers quoted in The Guardian, Janaury 24, 2002.

Companions close complete companion listing

wife:
Emma Kitchener. Film editor.
wife:
Emma Kitchener. Is lady-in-waiting to Princess Michael of Kent.

Family close complete family listing

son:
Peregrine Fellowes. Survived him.

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