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Robert Evans

Robert Evans

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Also Known As: Bob Evans, Bobby Evans, Robert Shapera, Robert J. Evans Died:
Born: June 29, 1930 Cause of Death:
Birth Place: New York City, New York, USA Profession: producer, actor, radio performer, executive, film teacher, clothing manufacturer

Biography CLOSE THE FULL BIOGRAPHY

Perhaps one of the most notorious personages ever to grace motion pictures, producer and former Paramount Pictures studio head Robert Evans blazed a trail through Hollywood that left behind numerous fractured marriages, countless heartbroken starlets, several friends-turned-enemies, and a career brimming with some of the best movies ever made. After receiving his start as an actor in movies like "The Sun Also Rises" (1957) and "The Best of Everything" (1959), Evans turned to producing in the late-1960s, which quickly led to becoming a powerful executive at the struggling Paramount Pictures. Almost immediately, Evans had a profound effect on the studio's bottom line, churning out hits like "Barefoot in the Park" (1967), "The Odd Couple" (1968) and "Rosemary's Baby" (1968). In the following decade, he steadied Paramount's fortunes with huge hits like "Love Story" (1970) and "The Godfather" (1972), before leaving the studio to branch out on his own as a producer with "Chinatown" (1974). Following up with "Marathon Man" (1976) and "Black Sunday" (1977), Evans seemed impervious to failure. But in 1980, following a cocaine bust and the ridicule endured from producing "Popeye" (1980), Evans hit a career...

Perhaps one of the most notorious personages ever to grace motion pictures, producer and former Paramount Pictures studio head Robert Evans blazed a trail through Hollywood that left behind numerous fractured marriages, countless heartbroken starlets, several friends-turned-enemies, and a career brimming with some of the best movies ever made. After receiving his start as an actor in movies like "The Sun Also Rises" (1957) and "The Best of Everything" (1959), Evans turned to producing in the late-1960s, which quickly led to becoming a powerful executive at the struggling Paramount Pictures. Almost immediately, Evans had a profound effect on the studio's bottom line, churning out hits like "Barefoot in the Park" (1967), "The Odd Couple" (1968) and "Rosemary's Baby" (1968). In the following decade, he steadied Paramount's fortunes with huge hits like "Love Story" (1970) and "The Godfather" (1972), before leaving the studio to branch out on his own as a producer with "Chinatown" (1974). Following up with "Marathon Man" (1976) and "Black Sunday" (1977), Evans seemed impervious to failure. But in 1980, following a cocaine bust and the ridicule endured from producing "Popeye" (1980), Evans hit a career slump that ended with him broke and ostracized from Hollywood. The final straw was "The Cotton Club" (1984), a huge flop that was mired in production excesses that also included the murder of a financier, for which Evans was briefly implicated. Sinking further into debt, depression and cocaine addiction, Evans languished in obscurity for the remainder of the decade. He reemerged with the misfire "Chinatown" sequel, "The Two Jakes" (1990), and spent the rest of the 1990s making critical and financial disasters like "Sliver" (1993), "Jade" (1995) and "The Saint" (1997). He earned a degree of cult status following the self-narrated documentary "The Kid Stays in the Picture" (2002), which introduced Evans to a new generation while reminding older crowds just how integral he had been to one of cinema's most vibrant eras.

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Filmographyclose complete filmography

CAST: (feature film)

1.
 Last Mogul, The (2005) Cast
2.
 Kid Stays in the Picture, The (2002) Narrator
3.
 Burn, Hollywood, Burn (1997) Himself
4.
 Cannes Man (1996) (Cameo Appearance)
5.
 The Best of Everything (1959) Dexter Key
6.
 The Fiend Who Walked the West (1958) Felix Griffin
7.
 The Sun Also Rises (1957) Pedro Romero
8.
 Man of a Thousand Faces (1957) Irving Thalberg
VIEW THE FULL FILMOGRAPHY

Milestones close milestones

:
From the age of eleven performed on over 300 radio shows including "Let's Pretend", "Archie Andrews", "The Aldrich Family", "Radio Reader's Digest" and "Gangbusters"
1947:
TV acting debut, "Elizabeth and Essex"
1951:
Went into clothing business as partner with brother, Charles Evans and Joseph Picone, founding Evan-Picone women's sportswear (until 1967) (date approximate)
1957:
Chosen by retired film star Norma Shearer to play her late husband, MGM producer Irving Thalberg, in the film biopic of actor Lon Chaney, "Man of a Thousand Faces"
1958:
Guest columnist for NEW YORK JOURNAL-AMERICAN
1966:
Joined 20th Century Fox as an independent producer
1966:
Became vice-president in charge of production, Paramount Pictures
:
Named vice president in charge of worldwide production, Paramount
:
Became executive vice president in charge of worldwide production, Paramount
1976:
Professor of film, Brown University
1980:
Arrested and convicted on a misdemeanor cocaine charge
1981:
Debut as TV producer, "Get High on Yourself", celebrity anti-drug specials
1991:
Signed exclusive five-year producing deal with Paramount after a hiatus from active producing
1998:
Suffered a mild stroke (on May 6)
2002:
Narrated and was subject of Sundance-screened documentary "The Kid Stays in the Picture", based on his memoir and directed by Nanette Burstein and Brett Morgan
2002:
Received a star on Hollywood's Walk of Fame
2002:
Signed to develop an animated series for Comedy Central starring himself in real-life show biz anecdotes; a sequel of sorts to "The Kid Stays in the Picture"
2003:
Executive produced the romantic comedy "How to Lose a Guy in 10 Days"
VIEW ALL MILESTONES

Notes

Film lecturer at USC, UCLA and NYU.

"Where is everyone? Dead? Most. Wealthy? Some. Destitute? Many. Retired? Suppose so, I ain't seen 'em. One thing I do know, I ain't dead, I ain't wealthy, I ain't destitute and I ain't retired." --Evans in his book "The Kid Stays in the Picture"

Companions close complete companion listing

wife:
Sharon Hugueny. Actor. Married on May 28, 1961; divorced; died on July 3, 1996 of cancer at age 52.
wife:
Camilla Sparv. Actor, model. Married on September 2, 1964; divorced.
wife:
Ali MacGraw. Actor. Married in 1970; divorced in 1972.
wife:
Phyllis George. TV host, sports commentator, former Miss America. Married on April 14, 1977; divorced in 1978.
companion:
Joan Severance. Actor. Dated briefly c. May 1998.
wife:
Catherine Oxenberg. Actor. Married on July 12, 1998; her second marriage; born c. 1961; announced plans to annul marriage after less than two weeks.
wife:
Leslie Ann Woodard. Born c. 1967; married in November 2002.
VIEW COMPLETE COMPANION LISTING

Family close complete family listing

father:
Archie Shapera. Dentist.
brother:
Charles Evans. Clothing manufacturer. Partner with brother in Evan-Picone women's sportswear company.
son:
Josh Evans. Actor, director, screenwriter. Mother Ali MacGraw; born c. 1971.

Bibliography close complete biography

"The Kid Stays in the Picture" Hyperion

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