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John Dykstra

John Dykstra

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Also Known As: Died:
Born: June 3, 1947 Cause of Death:
Birth Place: Long Beach, California, USA Profession: Visual Effects ...
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Worked as a cinematographer shooting miniatures for a psychological study sponsored by the National Science Foundation regarding responses to various architectural forms
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Worked as a special effects cameraman and industrial designer for special effects expert Douglas Trumbull's Trumbull Film Effects
1972:
Feature debut, credited for special effects photography for Trumbull's "Silent Running"
1973:
Worked for Berkeley's Institute of Urban Development on a project applying cinematography and visual effects to the construction of miniature cityscape models
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Served as director of special effects photography for a program entitled "Voyage to the Outer Planets" for the Ruben H Fleet Space Theater in San Diego, California
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Reteamed with Trumbull at the latter's Future General company to work on various projects including commercials, theme park attractions and experiments in three-dimensional filmmaking
1977:
While serving as the first head of Industrial Light and Magic, credited as the special effects photography supervisor on George Lucas' genre landmark, "Star Wars"
1978:
Left ILM to start his own special effects company, Apogee (date approximate)
1978:
TV series producing debut (with Donald P Bellisario, Paul Playdon and David J O'Connell), "Battlestar Galactica"; also first TV credit as special effects coordinator
1978:
Feature producing debut, "Battlestar Galactica", a re-edited theatrical version of the three-hour TV series pilot (also credited as special effects coordinator)
1982:
Credited as special visual effects producer for Clint Eastwood's "Firefox"
1983:
TV-movie debut, provided special effects for ABC's "Starflight: The Plane That Couldn't Land" (released theatrically overseas as "Starlight One")
1985:
First collaboration with horror-fantasy director Tobe Hooper, provided special visual effects for "Lifeforce"
1989:
Credited as special creative consultant on Hooper's "Spontaneous Combustion"
1995:
Served as visual effects head supervisor for "Batman Forever", his most commercially successful project since "Star Wars"
1997:
Reteamed with Schumacher for the sequel "Batman & Robin"
1999:
Served as senior visual effects supervisor on "Stuart Little"; shared an Academy Award nomination for Best Visual Effects
2004:
Served as visual effects supervisor for "Spider-Man 2"

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