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Alice Munro

Alice Munro

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Also Known As: Alice Ann Laidlaw, Alice Ann Munro Died:
Born: Cause of Death:
Birth Place: Profession:

Biography CLOSE THE FULL BIOGRAPHY

One of Canada's most lauded writers, Alice Munro has been heralded as a modern master of the short-story form. Raised in rural Ontario, Munro began publishing her fiction during the early 1950s, though her first story collection, Dance of the Happy Shades, didn't see the light of day until 1968. Met with considerable acclaim, the book prompted the author to pursue literature more actively, leading to numerous subsequent story volumes. Often favorably compared to American Southern Gothic tales, Munro's stories tend to focus on the complex emptions of Canadian women dealing with love and life. Although Munro's writing has been adapted in to television and film productions occasionally over the years, no adaptation reached a wide audience until actress, director and fellow Canadian Sarah Polley translated the story "The Bear Came Over the Mountain" into the feature film "Away from Her" (2006), which yielded two Oscar nominations. Over the years, Munro won many prestigious awards and announced her retirement during the summer of 2013, but that didn't stop generations of readers, both old and new, from marveling at her richly emotional stories. Born and brought up in small-town Ontario, Munro had a...

One of Canada's most lauded writers, Alice Munro has been heralded as a modern master of the short-story form. Raised in rural Ontario, Munro began publishing her fiction during the early 1950s, though her first story collection, Dance of the Happy Shades, didn't see the light of day until 1968. Met with considerable acclaim, the book prompted the author to pursue literature more actively, leading to numerous subsequent story volumes. Often favorably compared to American Southern Gothic tales, Munro's stories tend to focus on the complex emptions of Canadian women dealing with love and life. Although Munro's writing has been adapted in to television and film productions occasionally over the years, no adaptation reached a wide audience until actress, director and fellow Canadian Sarah Polley translated the story "The Bear Came Over the Mountain" into the feature film "Away from Her" (2006), which yielded two Oscar nominations. Over the years, Munro won many prestigious awards and announced her retirement during the summer of 2013, but that didn't stop generations of readers, both old and new, from marveling at her richly emotional stories.

Born and brought up in small-town Ontario, Munro had a farmer for a father and a schoolteacher for a mother, making it very fitting that she gravitated towards penning stories about Canadian countryside living. While attending college at the University of Western Ontario, she published her first short story, "The Dimensions of a Shadow," and subsequently left school to marry James Munro, with the young couple eventually establishing the shop Munro's Books in Victoria, British Columbia. In 1968, her debut story collection, Dance of the Happy Shades, met with a warm reception, with Lives of Girls and Women following in 1971. James and Alice divorced in 1972, and she returned to Ontario. Consistently drawing accolades, Munro's tales were periodically collected throughout the 1970s and '80s. In 1983, her story "Boys and Girls" served as the basis for the Academy Award-winning short film of the same name, and, 13 years later, Lives of Girls & Women was adapted into a CBC TV movie that earned numerous Gemini award nods.

In 2001, Munro published Hateship, Friendship, Courtship, Loveship, Marriage. In addition to garnering critical praise, the story compilation inspired Canadian indie actress Sarah Polley to craft her feature screenwriting and directing debut, "Away from Her," a fittingly pensive take on "The Bear Came Over the Mountain," starring Julie Christie, Gordon Pinsent and Olympia Dukakis. Highly acclaimed, the film made Munro's name known to discerning cinephiles that may have previously missed her work. Three years later, she won the Man Booker International Prize for her various writings, while simultaneously contending with both heart problems and cancer. Dear Life was published in 2012, and met with typically positive reviews, noting Munro's reliable insightfulness and signature delicate way with small moments. The following year was a big one for Munro announcements - that summer she stated her intention to retire, with Dear Life standing as her final book. Then, in October of 2013, she was the recipient of the Nobel Prize in Literature, breaking ground as the first-ever Canadian woman to receive the honor. Meanwhile, another high-profile Munro film adaptation, "Hateship Loveship," starring Kristen Wiig and Guy Pearce, was released, debuting, appropriately enough, at the 2013 Toronto Film Festival.

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Filmographyclose complete filmography

CAST: (feature film)

1.
 Voices on the Water (1987) Writer
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Milestones close milestones

1968:
First story collection, <i>Dance of the Happy Shades</i>, published
1971:
Second book, <i>Lives of Girls and Women</i>, released
1978:
<i>Who Do You Think You Are?</i> published
1984:
Short-film adaptation of "Boys and Girls" won Oscar
1996:
TV movie of <i>Lives of Girls & Women</i> aired on CBC
1998:
<i>The Love of a Good Woman</i> released
2001:
<i>Hateship, Friendship, Courtship, Loveship, Marriage</i> published
2006:
Sarah Polley's "Away from Her," a feature adaptation of a Munro short story, is released
2012:
<i>Dear Life</i> published
2013:
The film adaptation "Hateship Loveship" debuted
2013:
Awarded the Nobel Prize for Literature
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Education

University of Western Ontario: - 1949 - 1951

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