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Bob Duncan

Bob Duncan

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Also Known As: Died:
Born: Cause of Death:
Birth Place: Profession: Cast ...
RATE AND COMMENT

COMPLETE FILMOGRAPHY WITH SYNOPSIS

Cast (feature film)

1.
The Parson and the Outlaw (1957) as
Billy the Kid fakes his death so he can go straight.
2.
The Marshal's Daughter (1953) as Trigger Gans
Produced by Ken Murray strictly as a vehicle for Laurie Anders, his curvy protege from his television show and billed above the title and first billed in the cast as Laurie ("I-like-the-wide-open-spaces") Anders, which was her catch-line phrase and how she was introduced and known. This is neither a comedy, satire or parody---missing badly on all attempts at such---and isn't much of a western either, even by bottom-of-the-barrel B-standards. The plot by veteran B-western villain player Bob Duncan, who did manage to write himself the best role in the movie, relative to there being no good roles in this movie, has town banker Anderson (Robert Bray as Bob Bray), the secret head of an outlaw gang, trying to organize a Cattleman's Association and not getting any takers. He sends for Trigger Gans (Bob Duncan) to act as a persuader. But a mysterious, masked rider known as El Coyote begins to resist. El Coyote is of course Laurie Dawson (Laurie Anders as Laurie "I-like-the-wide-open-spaces" Anders), daughter of retired Marshal and rancher Ben Dawson (Hoot Gibson), and her El Coyote role ensured that whoever stunt-doubled her would wear pads where no stunt man ever wore them, with the possible later exception of Dean Smith doubling Maureen O'Hara in "McLintock." The heroines that Dave Sharpe doubled in Republic serials weren't built like Laurie Anders. Producer Ken Murray, as a riverboat gambler named Sliding Bill Murray, rolls into town on the same stage as Trigger Gans, and then promptly engages Preston Foster, Johnny Mack Brown,Jimmy Wakely and Buddy Baer(in cameo roles) in a blackout-skit poker game written by himself, which had to have been even more painful for the participants than the viewers. Ralph Staub used to get better stuff than this in his "Screen Snapshots" just roaming around Columbia's backlot and interviewing Smiley Burnette and Ringeye.
3.
New Mexico (1951) as Cpl. Mack
Captain Hunt of the cavalry is trying to promote good relations with the Indian chief Acoma. But Hunt's superiors in the military insist on pursuing policies that will provoke a conflict, and Chief Acoma is not willing to let himself be insulted.
4.
Law of the Panhandle (1950) as Evans
Sheriff Tom Stocker (Riley Hill) sends for U.S. Marshal Johnny Mack (Johnny Mack Brown) to help him stop an outlaw reign of terror which is driving ranchers from Green Valley. En route, Johnny witnesses the murder of a messenger who is carrying secret information to the sheriff, and he and Stocker trail the killers to their hideout, where the sheriff is wounded in a gunfight and the killers get away. Stocker recognizes one of the men as Ed Rance (Marshall Reed), and Johnny watches him hoping to get a lead onto the identity of the gang leader. The news of a new secret rail route leads Johnny to check on who has being buying up land, and he learns that only stage-line owner Henry Faulkner (Myron Healey) and rancher Fred Kendal (Ted Adams), father of the sheriff's sweetheart Margie (Jane Adams) has recently purchased land. Faulker tells Johnny that Kendal has rounded up his entire herd, in order to sell it to purchase more land. Kendal is seriously wounded when the herd is stampeded by the outlaws, and Johnny gives out the news that Kendal is dead. Rance makes Marge an offer for the ranch on the behalf of a mysterious friend, but is taken captive by Johnny. The latter rides to town and asks Faulkner to come to the Kendal ranch to identify a possible outlaw suspect.
5.
Son of Billy the Kid (1949) as Clem Yantis
6.
The Fighting Redhead (1949) as Sheriff
7.
Outlaw Country (1949) as Fighting deputy
8.
The Westward Trail (1948) as Larson
Ann and Tom Howard arrive from the east to take up ranching. But Tom wants to return and forges his sister's name to the deed and sells it to Larson. Eddie knows there is silver ore in the area and that Lawson, who killed the Sheriff, is out to get all the ranches. When Lawson appoints himself the new Sheriff, Eddie organizes the ranchers to fight Lawson and his men.
9.
Range Beyond the Blue (1947) as Lash Taggert
10.
Border Feud (1947) as Jack Barton
11.
Rainbow Over the Rockies (1947) as John Harvin
12.
Tumbleweed Trail (1946) as Brad Barton
Barton has his men knock off Bill Ryan so that Barton will end up with his ranch. He has a forged will that gives the ranch and everything on it to him, and not Bill's kid's. But Eddie and Soapy show up to help Robin retain the ranch for as long as she can. But Barton's lawyer, Small, seems to have all the cards and wants Robin out so that Barton can pay off his debts.
13.
Colorado Serenade (1946) as Ringo
Duke Dillon has his gang robbing stagecoaches carrying gold which is then melted down by his father. But Eddie and his sidekick Soapy are on the job and they are aided by undercover man Nevada.
14.
Wild West (1946) as Rockey
Eddie and his sidekicks have been called in to help get a new telegraph line through. Dawson and his men along with his stooge Judge are out to stop them. When Eddie and the boys catch three of Dawson's men destroying telegraph equipment, the Judge releases them and this leads to the showdown between the two sides.
15.
Moon Over Montana (1946) as Brick Donovan
16.
The Caravan Trail (1946) as Killer
17.
Up Goes Maisie (1946) as
A showgirl working for an inventor battles crooks out to steal his ideas.
18.
Song of the Sierras (1946) as Bill Danvers
19.
Northwest Trail (1945) as Ollie
Mountie Matt O'Brien is assigned to escort Miss Owens to a remote outpost. But when he finds an illegal mining operation there that is smuggling gold across the border, his superior Sgt. Means orders him to leave.
20.
Flaming Bullets (1945) as Eddie
In the finale of the Texas Rangers series, Tex, Dave, and Panhandle are after the gang that break outlaws out of jail, kill them, and then collect the reward. Dave is the bait posing as his look alike, the wanted outlaw Steve Carson.
21.
The Cisco Kid Returns (1945) as
The Cisco Kid (Duncan Renaldo) and Pancho (Martin Garralaga) stop the marriage of Rosita (Cecelia Callejo) to Harris (Roger Pryor) by claiming that Cisco is already married to her, and exhibit a borrowed child, Nancy (Sharon Smith) as proof. Cisco carries off the furious Rosita, but finds, when returning Nancy, that her real father (Walter Clinton) has been shot to death. Assuming responsibility for Nancy, Cisco sends her and Rosita to stay with Tia (Eva Puig), and he visits the local padre (Fritz Leiber). Harris and Conway (Anthony Warde) scheme to get custody of the child, so they can obtain the money left to her by her father. As part of the plot, an actress (Vicky Lane), comes to town posing as the girl's mother, accompanied by her maid Jeanette (Jan Wiley). Rosita, jealous of the attention Cisco is paying to Jeanette, tells Harris where the child is being kept in hiding. Cisco sends Pancho to the sheriff (Bud Osborne) with a message promising to give himself up for "kidnapping" Nancy if the sheriff will bring along "Mrs. Page" and Conway.
22.
End of the Road (1944) as Barnery, poker player
23.
Action in the North Atlantic (1943) as Signal man
A Merchant Marine crew fights off enemy attacks at the start of World War II.
24.
Scandal Street (1938) as Newsboy

Writer (feature film)

25.
Black Gold (1963) as Screenwriter
26.
The Marshal's Daughter (1953) as Orig scr
Produced by Ken Murray strictly as a vehicle for Laurie Anders, his curvy protege from his television show and billed above the title and first billed in the cast as Laurie ("I-like-the-wide-open-spaces") Anders, which was her catch-line phrase and how she was introduced and known. This is neither a comedy, satire or parody---missing badly on all attempts at such---and isn't much of a western either, even by bottom-of-the-barrel B-standards. The plot by veteran B-western villain player Bob Duncan, who did manage to write himself the best role in the movie, relative to there being no good roles in this movie, has town banker Anderson (Robert Bray as Bob Bray), the secret head of an outlaw gang, trying to organize a Cattleman's Association and not getting any takers. He sends for Trigger Gans (Bob Duncan) to act as a persuader. But a mysterious, masked rider known as El Coyote begins to resist. El Coyote is of course Laurie Dawson (Laurie Anders as Laurie "I-like-the-wide-open-spaces" Anders), daughter of retired Marshal and rancher Ben Dawson (Hoot Gibson), and her El Coyote role ensured that whoever stunt-doubled her would wear pads where no stunt man ever wore them, with the possible later exception of Dean Smith doubling Maureen O'Hara in "McLintock." The heroines that Dave Sharpe doubled in Republic serials weren't built like Laurie Anders. Producer Ken Murray, as a riverboat gambler named Sliding Bill Murray, rolls into town on the same stage as Trigger Gans, and then promptly engages Preston Foster, Johnny Mack Brown,Jimmy Wakely and Buddy Baer(in cameo roles) in a blackout-skit poker game written by himself, which had to have been even more painful for the participants than the viewers. Ralph Staub used to get better stuff than this in his "Screen Snapshots" just roaming around Columbia's backlot and interviewing Smiley Burnette and Ringeye.

Music (feature film)

27.
Chain Gang Women (1971) as Composer

Misc. Crew (feature film)

28.
29.

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