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Abbas Kiarostami

Abbas Kiarostami

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Taste Of Cherry: The Criterion Collection... Co-winner of the Palme d'Or at the 1997 Cannes Film Festival, "The Taste of... more info $19.99was $29.95 Buy Now

Close-Up: The Criterion Collection... Internationally revered Iranian filmmaker Abbas Kiarostami (Taste of Cherry,... more info $26.99was $39.95 Buy Now



Also Known As: Died:
Born: June 22, 1940 Cause of Death:
Birth Place: Iran Profession: screenwriter, director, producer, editor, painter, illustrator, graphic artist, photographer

Biography CLOSE THE FULL BIOGRAPHY

Called the grandfather of the Iranian New Wave of Cinema, director Abbas Kiarostami has drawn comparisons to Ingmar Bergman, Michelangelo Antonioni and Jean-Luc Godard, and no less a personage than Japanese auteur Akira Kurosawa considers him the rightful heir to Satyajit Ray's mantle as the greatest living practitioner of social realist filmmaking. His pictures depict a country far different from the medieval Iran of the nightly newscast. Underneath the surface orthodoxy of the present regime beats the heart of Persia--a cosmopolitan culture of long-standing artistic and literary sophistication. Working in the tradition of Italian neo-realism, Kiarostami captures a lyrical but concrete feel for the particulars of place and visual atmosphere and elicits strikingly natural performances from non-actors, blurring the boundaries between fiction and documentary to serve a simple, elegant painterly direction that elevates his stories to the level of poetic allegory.

Called the grandfather of the Iranian New Wave of Cinema, director Abbas Kiarostami has drawn comparisons to Ingmar Bergman, Michelangelo Antonioni and Jean-Luc Godard, and no less a personage than Japanese auteur Akira Kurosawa considers him the rightful heir to Satyajit Ray's mantle as the greatest living practitioner of social realist filmmaking. His pictures depict a country far different from the medieval Iran of the nightly newscast. Underneath the surface orthodoxy of the present regime beats the heart of Persia--a cosmopolitan culture of long-standing artistic and literary sophistication. Working in the tradition of Italian neo-realism, Kiarostami captures a lyrical but concrete feel for the particulars of place and visual atmosphere and elicits strikingly natural performances from non-actors, blurring the boundaries between fiction and documentary to serve a simple, elegant painterly direction that elevates his stories to the level of poetic allegory.

Filmographyclose complete filmography

DIRECTOR:

2.
3.
  Shirin (2008)
5.
  Tickets (2005)
6.
  10 on Ten (2005) Director
8.
  Ten (2002) Director
9.
  ABC Africa (2001) Director
10.
  Wind Will Carry Us, The (1999) Director

CAST: (feature film)

1.
 Kurosawa's Way (2011)
3.
 Words In Progress (2004) Himself
5.
 ABC Africa (2001) Himself
7.
 Close-Up (1990) Himself
VIEW THE FULL FILMOGRAPHY

Milestones close milestones

:
Worked for years doing commercials and graphic design
1969:
Invited to help found the cinema department of the Institute for the Intellectual Development of Children and Young Adults in Tehran, Iran
1970:
Directed first short film, "Bread and Alley"
1972:
First feature, "The Traveler"
1977:
Second feature, "The Report"; made outside the Institute's auspices
1979:
His 53-minute documentary "Case No 1, Case No 2" condemned highschoolers who ratted on their neighbors; confused officials of the new Islamic regime first gave it an award, then banned it; also made without Institute money
1987:
Third dramatic feature and first since the revolution, "Where Is the Friend's House?", told a simple tale of a rural boy trying to return a friend's notebook after school; eventually became the first film of a trilogy inspired by a 1989 earthquake that devastated the area where it was filmed
1989:
Locarno Film Festival screened "Where Is the Friend's House?", introducing him to a European audience
1990:
The most famous of his documentaries, "Close-Up", depicted the trial of a poor man who gained illicit entree into the upper classes by posing as a famous film director
1992:
Second film of trilogy, "And Life Goes On", was a documentary-like fictional tale of the filmmaker and his son searching to see if his actors had survived the earthquake; won the Rossellini prize at Cannes
1994:
Third film of trilogy, "Through the Olive Trees", was his first film to gain major notice in the states
1995:
Contributed to two group projects: "A Propos de Nice, La Suite", a tribute to the French filmmaker Jean Vigo who died at age 29, and "Lumiere and Company", featuring 39 international directors' work with the original Lumiere camera and homemade film stock
1995:
Wrote the script for former assistant Jafar Panahi's "The White Baloon", which won the Camera d'Or at Cannes
1997:
"Ta'm e Guilass/Taste of Cherry" won the Palme d'Or at Cannes
1999:
Wrote, directed and edited "The Wind Will Carry Us/Le vent nous emportera"
2000:
Exhibit of photographs featured at NYC's Andrea Rosen Gallery
VIEW ALL MILESTONES

Notes

About why he wears dark glasses inside: "The retina in my left eye has remained open, and no matter what I do it remains open, and it lets too much light in. I have no idea what happened."-- Abbas Kiarostami, FANFARE, April 6, 1998

"In 'Through the Olive Trees' we were making a movie about making a movie, but there were moments in the film when we weren't 'doing' anything. I was even sometimes tempted to put a black leader in betwen the scenes--because I was constantly hunting for scenes in which there was 'nothing happening.' That nothingness I wanted to include in my film. Some places in a movie there should be nothing happening, like in 'Closeup', where somebody kicks a can (in the street). But I needed that. I needed that nothing there . . .

"So when people tell me 'Your movie slows down here a little bit,' I love that! Because if it doesn't slow down, then I can't lift it again. And that's the problem with American movies: it's all lifting and lifting and lifting." --Abbas Kiarostami in FILM COMMENT, July-August 1996

About ending "And Life Goes On" and "Through the Olive Trees" with elaborately planned shot-sequences, what the French call plans-sequence: "When I use a longshot it distances me from cast and crew, and that affords them an opportunity to submerge themselves into the environment. That's also why I use a telephoto lens and pan with it. It's why I try to avoid tracking shots, because in tracking shots the whole crew stays too close to the actors and makes them self-conscious. It's my experience that when the camera is at a distance from the actors, they feel better, more like themselves, more able to relax into their characters. After the first one or two minutes of a shot-sequence, that's when the performances get interesting." --Kiarostami to FILM COMMENT, July-August 1996

Family close complete family listing

son:
Bahman Kiarostami. Born c. 1978; credited as second assistant director on "Taste of Cherry"; began working with father on "Where Is The Friend's House" (1987), writing the lines for the two kids.

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