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Tony Vitale

Tony Vitale

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Also Known As: Died:
Born: Cause of Death:
Birth Place: Bronx, New York, USA Profession: director, screenwriter, location scout, location manager, location intern

Biography CLOSE THE FULL BIOGRAPHY

Bronx-born Tony Vitale worked his way up from location intern to location manager on films by directors Irwin Winkler, Robert De Niro, Nick Gomez and Paul Mazursky before making his writing and directing debut with "Kiss Me Guido" (1997), a film that brings together gay and "guido" cultures in an attempt to break down the walls existing between the disparate groups, "... to reduce people to human beings instead of labels." Vitale did it first as a one-act play at the Village Gate in 1991, wrote the second act in 1993, turned it into a screenplay in 1994 and went about acquiring financing. "Kiss Me Guido", lensed for less than $1 million, rewarded its producers Ira Deutchman and Christine Vachon when it sold to Paramount Pictures for a reported $2 million. After working on "A Bronx Tale" (1993) for a year, De Niro reportedly called him into his trailer and said, "Tony, would you mind taking a crew up to the Bronx and taking the opening shot of the film." Vitale's first 37 seconds as a filmmaker were the opening shots of "A Bronx Tale".

Bronx-born Tony Vitale worked his way up from location intern to location manager on films by directors Irwin Winkler, Robert De Niro, Nick Gomez and Paul Mazursky before making his writing and directing debut with "Kiss Me Guido" (1997), a film that brings together gay and "guido" cultures in an attempt to break down the walls existing between the disparate groups, "... to reduce people to human beings instead of labels." Vitale did it first as a one-act play at the Village Gate in 1991, wrote the second act in 1993, turned it into a screenplay in 1994 and went about acquiring financing. "Kiss Me Guido", lensed for less than $1 million, rewarded its producers Ira Deutchman and Christine Vachon when it sold to Paramount Pictures for a reported $2 million. After working on "A Bronx Tale" (1993) for a year, De Niro reportedly called him into his trailer and said, "Tony, would you mind taking a crew up to the Bronx and taking the opening shot of the film." Vitale's first 37 seconds as a filmmaker were the opening shots of "A Bronx Tale".

Filmographyclose complete filmography

DIRECTOR:

1.
  One Last Ride (2004) Director
2.
  Very Mean Men (2000) Director
3.
  Kiss Me Guido (1997) Director

CAST: (feature film)

1.
 Very Mean Men (2000)
2.
 Independent's Day (1997) Himself
VIEW THE FULL FILMOGRAPHY

Milestones close milestones

1991:
Began his motion-picture career as an intern, scouting locations for independent films
1991:
Staged a one-act play at the Village Gate that was the genesis of "Kiss Me Guido"
:
Worked as a location manager for directors like Paul Mazursky, Irwin Winkler, Hal Hartley, and Nick Gomez
:
After working on "A Bronx Tale" for a year, director Robert De Niro had Vitale shoot the opening for the film (first 37 seconds); film released in 1993
1997:
Feature screenwriting and directing debut with "Kiss Me Guido"
2001:
Was supervising producer, series creator and writer of the short-lived CBS sitcom "Some of My Best Friends", adapted from "Kiss Me Guido"
VIEW ALL MILESTONES

Notes

On criticism that his "Kiss Me Guido" characters are stereotypes: "... I call myself an equal opprtunity offender. I hold no bars [when] saying something that might be a little crude about either group. The humor that people respond to in the film is very real humor. [The audience] can totally see these characters saying the things they say. But because we live in this politically correct world, we don't get to see these kinds of characters on television or in movies.

"I wish I could introduce everyone who thinks [the characters are stereotypes] to my friends who exemplify the roles. The two biggest 'stereotypes' are the older brother Pino and [the gay lead's] best friend Terry, played by Craig Chester. We are showing the film at the New Festival, the NY Gay and Lesbian Festival, in June, and I want to bring down my real-life Terry and my real-life Pino to the festival and say, 'Here's a guido, here's a fag, if you have any questions, talk to the three of us later!'" --Tony Vitale in Filmmaker Magazine, Summer 1997.

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