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Ian Mcewan

Ian Mcewan

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Also Known As: Ian Russell Mcewan Died:
Born: May 21, 1948 Cause of Death:
Birth Place: Profession: screenwriter, novelist, oratorio lyricist

Biography CLOSE THE FULL BIOGRAPHY

Noted English author of novels and short stories dabbled in ambitious British TV plays and features before making his Hollywood screenwriting debut with "The Good Son" (1993), a decidedly popular thriller starring Macaulay Culkin. McEwan began writing at age 22 and had "First Love, Last Rites", an award-winning collection of short stories, published by age 26. His first TV play, "Solid Geometry", was banned by the BBC for its sexual content but his next, "The Competition Game" (1980), garnered acclaim. Helmed by respected stage director Richard Eyre, this feminist-themed WWII drama received a theatrical release after the success of McEwan's screenwriting debut, "The Ploughman's Lunch" (1983), a sharp dissection of English manners and politics set during the Falklands War. McEwan's third play for British TV was entitled "Jack Flea's Birthday". His novel "The Comfort of Strangers" was adapted by Harold Pinter for the creepy Paul Schrader-directed feature (1990). McEwan transformed his novel "The Innocent" into a screenplay for a John Schlesinger-directed feature starring Anthony Hopkins and Isabella Rossellini. "The Cement Garden", another McEwan novel, has also been adapted for the screen. ...

Noted English author of novels and short stories dabbled in ambitious British TV plays and features before making his Hollywood screenwriting debut with "The Good Son" (1993), a decidedly popular thriller starring Macaulay Culkin. McEwan began writing at age 22 and had "First Love, Last Rites", an award-winning collection of short stories, published by age 26. His first TV play, "Solid Geometry", was banned by the BBC for its sexual content but his next, "The Competition Game" (1980), garnered acclaim. Helmed by respected stage director Richard Eyre, this feminist-themed WWII drama received a theatrical release after the success of McEwan's screenwriting debut, "The Ploughman's Lunch" (1983), a sharp dissection of English manners and politics set during the Falklands War. McEwan's third play for British TV was entitled "Jack Flea's Birthday". His novel "The Comfort of Strangers" was adapted by Harold Pinter for the creepy Paul Schrader-directed feature (1990). McEwan transformed his novel "The Innocent" into a screenplay for a John Schlesinger-directed feature starring Anthony Hopkins and Isabella Rossellini. "The Cement Garden", another McEwan novel, has also been adapted for the screen.

Filmographyclose complete filmography

CAST: (feature film)

VIEW THE FULL FILMOGRAPHY

Milestones close milestones

:
Spent childhood in Singapore and Libya
1972:
Began writing at age 22
:
Wrote teleplay for "Solid Geometry" for the BBC; banned by BBC for sexual imagery
1976:
Published his first collection of short stories, <i>First Love, Last Rites</i>
1980:
Wrote the acclaimed British TV play, "The Imitation Game," directed by Richard Eyre (released theatrically in 1983)
1983:
Feature screenwriting debut, "The Ploughman's Lunch," directed by Richard Eyre
1988:
Adapted Timothy Mo's novel, "Soursweet" for a feature directed by Mike Newell
1993:
US feature screenwriting debut, "The Good Son"
1997:
Wrote the novel, <i>Enduring Love</i>; adapted into a feature in 2004, starring Daniel Craig, Rhys Ifans and Samantha Morton
1998:
Awarded the Booker Prize for his novel <i>Amsterdam</i>
2002:
Published the novel, <i>Atonement</i>; was named best novel of 2002 by <i>Time</i> magazine
2005:
Published the novel, <i>Saturday</i>, which follows an especially eventful day in the life of a successful neurosurgeon
2007:
"Atonement" starring James McAvoy and Keira Knightley, was adapted from his novel of the same name
VIEW ALL MILESTONES

Education

University of Sussex at Brighton: -
University of East Anglia: -
Woolverstone Hall School: -

Notes

McEwan's novel, "The Comfort of Strangers" was shortlisted for the 1981 Booker Prize.

McEwan's novel, "Black Dogs" was shortlisted for the 1992 Booker Prize.

His "Atonement: A Novel" was shortlisted for the 2001 Booker Prize.

McEwan wrote the words for the oratorio "Or Shall We Die" with music by M. Berkeley.

He was made a Commander of the Order of the British Empire (CBE) in December 1999

Companions close complete companion listing

wife:
Penny Allen. Faith healer, meditation tutor. Her second marriage; met while both were attending the University of Sussex at Brighton; remet in the 1970s and began relationship after her divorce; married in 1982; separated in 1994; divorced in 1995; since separation, engaged in protracted custody battle over their sons.
wife:
Annalena McAfee. Journalist. Married in 1997; she lives in London while he lives in Oxford.

Bibliography close complete biography

"First Love, Last Rites"
"In Between the Sheets"
"The Cement Garden"
"The Comfort of Strangers"
"Rose Blanche" Jonathan Cape Children's Books
"The Child In Time"
"The Innocent"
"Black Dogs"
"The Daydreamer" Red Fox
"Enduring Love"
"Amsterdam"
"Atonement: A Novel" Jonathan Cape
VIEW COMPLETE BIBLIOGRAPHY

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