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Kevin Smith

Kevin Smith

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For a Good Time Call ... Overachiever Lauren (Lauren Anne Miller) is suddenly on her own after her... more info $11.95was $14.98 Buy Now

Comic Book: The Movie ... Directors Mark Hamill; features Mark Hamill, Donna D'Errico, Billy West, Jess... more info $8.95was $9.98 Buy Now

Chasing Amy / Jay and Silent... Includes 3 films by Kevin Smith: Chasing Amy, Clerks and Jay & Silent Bob Strike... more info $11.95was $14.98 Buy Now

Drawing Flies: Anniversary... Jason Lee ("My Name is Earl") stars as "Donner", the unofficial leader of a... more info $14.95was $19.95 Buy Now

Independents Day ... Always wanted to be at Sundance? Well here's your ticket. INDEPENDENT'S DAY gets... more info $16.95was $26.95 Buy Now

Also Known As: Kevin Patrick Smith Died:
Born: August 2, 1970 Cause of Death:
Birth Place: Red Bank, New Jersey, USA Profession: director, editor, screenwriter, producer, actor, comic book writer, cashier, comic book store owner

Biography CLOSE THE FULL BIOGRAPHY

09) on a recurring basis for short filmed comedy bits. Among the more amusing were the collection of Smith's snarky road trips across America, visiting "Roadside Attractions" like giant balls of twine, and short films like "The Flying Car" featuring the "Clerks" characters trapped in traffic discussing what they would do to have a flying car like the Jetsons.Smith also put his career as a writer of comics firmly on track with the debut of Clerks (the Comic) (1998), followed by the adventures of Jay & Silent Bob in Bluntman and Chronic - which was first featured in "Chasing Amy" - as well as his collaborations on Marvel Comics' Daredevil and DC's Green Arrow. His track record faltered in 2002, however, when he put his focus back on movies and failed to finish his runs on the miniseries Spider-Man: Black Cat and Daredevil: Bullseye, something his fans skewered him about afterwards. Indeed, it was his collected paperback run of Daredevil that lured his friend Ben Affleck - another childhood fan of the character - to pen a glowing introduction, which in turn inspired Marvel Productions and 20th Century Fox to lobby successfully to cast the actor as the blind superhero in the 2003 film. Smith also had a...

09) on a recurring basis for short filmed comedy bits. Among the more amusing were the collection of Smith's snarky road trips across America, visiting "Roadside Attractions" like giant balls of twine, and short films like "The Flying Car" featuring the "Clerks" characters trapped in traffic discussing what they would do to have a flying car like the Jetsons.

Smith also put his career as a writer of comics firmly on track with the debut of Clerks (the Comic) (1998), followed by the adventures of Jay & Silent Bob in Bluntman and Chronic - which was first featured in "Chasing Amy" - as well as his collaborations on Marvel Comics' Daredevil and DC's Green Arrow. His track record faltered in 2002, however, when he put his focus back on movies and failed to finish his runs on the miniseries Spider-Man: Black Cat and Daredevil: Bullseye, something his fans skewered him about afterwards. Indeed, it was his collected paperback run of Daredevil that lured his friend Ben Affleck - another childhood fan of the character - to pen a glowing introduction, which in turn inspired Marvel Productions and 20th Century Fox to lobby successfully to cast the actor as the blind superhero in the 2003 film. Smith also had a cameo role, playing a morgue attendant named Jack Kirby, after the prominent Marvel comic book artist. He also became one of the first filmmakers to engage in regular, near-direct dialogue with his audience, communicating via the Internet through his web sites MoviePoopShoot.com and ViewAskew.com.

During the media furor surrounding the "Bennifer" romance between Affleck and Jennifer Lopez, Smith often found himself acting as an unofficial spokesperson for the couple, given his closeness to Affleck and the fact the couple were both appearing in his romantic comedy "Jersey Girl" (2004). When the pair's previous film outing "Gigli" (2003) was labeled a bomb of epic proportions and the relationship subsequently fell apart, Smith and his film's marketers made a painstaking effort to point out that Lopez's role was pivotal, but brief in an effort to distance his film from the "Gigli" catastrophe. Instead, "Jersey Girl" - which opened to mixed reviews and unspectacular box office, but came nowhere near the flop that was "Gigli" - focused on Affleck as a driven, urban public relations executive who becomes a widowed single dad stuck in the Jersey suburbs with his dad (George Carlin) and his daughter (Raquel Castro), and who unexpectedly gets a second chance at love with a video store employee (Liv Tyler). Smith threw out much of his juvenile humor - along with Jay & Silent Bob - out the window and attempted to tell a more straightforward, romantic story, albeit with mixed success.

Perhaps in a sign of his creative well starting to dry, Smith returned to comfortable ground with "Clerks II" (2006), another raunchy look at the slacker lives of Dante (Brian O'Halloran) and Randall (Jeff Anderson), who - after years of still working behind the counters of the Quick Stop and video store - are forced to find new jobs when the strip mall burns to the ground. Having already been there and done that, Smith offered very little that was new - some even accused him of retreating to familiar territory after taking uncertain steps onto new ground with "Jersey Girl" - though the sequel did have flourishes of classic witty Smith dialogue. Made for a paltry $5 million, "Clerks II" did well enough at the box office to turn a profit. Meanwhile, Smith made a rare foray into television, serving as executive producer and directing the pilot episode on "Reaper" (CW, 2007- ), a supernatural dramedy about a young man, Sam (Bret Harrison), who learns on his 21st birthday that his parents made a deal with the Devil (Ray Wise) to give him the soul of their first born in order for his father to recover from a grave illness, leading Sam to serve as a bounty hunter for souls escaped from Hell. Back in features, Smith wrote and directed "Zack and Miri Make a Porno" (2008), a romantic comedy about two roommates (Seth Rogen and Elizabeth Banks) who decide to make an adult film in order to pay their ever-mounting bills. The film marked the first time since his debut "Clerks" that Smith had no role - not even a cameo - for Ben Affleck.owitz to their cause, Smith and Mosier appealed the decision and eventually got their sought-after 'R' rating. Playing in a limited number of art house theaters, "Clerks" grossed a surprising $2 million and garnered wide critical acclaim.

By the time "Clerks was released, Smith was already neck deep with his next effort, "Mallrats" (1995), an irreverent comedy about two New Jersey slackers (Jeremy London and Jason Lee) who look for solace at the local mall after being dumped by their girlfriends (Shannon Doherty and Claire Forlani). Funded by distributor Gramercy for $5.8 million, "Mallrats" earned lukewarm critical notices and bombed at the box office. Chastened by the blight on his fledgling career, Smith ate crow before a crowd at the 1996 Sundance Film Festival, saying "I want to apologize for Mallrats. I have no idea what we were thinking." In fact, the only notable achievement of his sophomore effort was the launching of former skateboarder Jason Lee's feature and television career. But Smith redeemed himself to many with the critically-acclaimed romantic comedy, "Chasing Amy" (1997), which depicted the unlikely relationship between Alyssa (Joey Lauren Adams), a bisexual comic book creator, and fellow comic writer Holden (Ben Affleck), which causes untold fits of jealousy with his best friend and writing partner, Banky (Jason Lee). Made for only a quarter million dollars, "Chasing Amy" was a big art house hit, taking in over $12 million at the box office, while repairing the damage Smith created with "Mallrats."

Back on top of his game, Smith began to expand his horizons beyond writing and directing when he served as executive producer on "Good Will Hunting" (1997), written by Ben Affleck and Matt Damon. Meanwhile, Smith merged his passions for film and comics when he wrote a screenplay for "Superman Lives" which Tim Burton was assigned to direct. Conflicts with Warner Bros. and Burton, however, relegated the project to the trash heap. When he returned to his bread and butter, Smith departed from the boy-girl relationship format of his previous movies in directing "Dogma" (1999), a controversial religious satire about two fallen angels (Affleck and Damon) trying to re-enter Heaven despite the apocalyptic havoc they aim to create. Also starring Linda Fiorentino, George Carlin, Chris Rock, Salma Hayek and Alan Rickman, "Dogma" featured some witty dialogue which was largely buried by an avalanche of exposition that was required to move forward a convoluted and often pointless plot. Regardless of the attention created by Smith's skewering of Catholicism, the film ultimately proved that the director's talents were better served in more slacker-friendly fare.

With his next effort, Smith tried to deliver a lighthearted romp starring his recurring side characters Jay & Silent Bob in the madcap "Jay & Silent Bob Strike Back" (2001), a hodgepodge of several amusing, but ultimately pointless sequences that showcased some classic Smith dialogue that nonetheless proved too meandering and exposition-laden to bear. Smith brought back many of the characters from his previous films - what he called the View Askew universe, named after his production company - including his close buddy Ben Affleck as both Holden from "Chasing Amy" and a parody version of his movie-star self. Ultimately, the movie made a decent showing at the box office despite being panned by critics. Always a dazzling raconteur and canny self-promoter, Smith made forays into television, turning "Clerks" into a short-lived animated series for ABC, which both aired and ended in 2000. In 2002, Smith joined "The Tonight Show with Jay Leno" (NBC, 1991-20

VIEW THE FULL BIOGRAPHY

Filmographyclose complete filmography

DIRECTOR:

1.
  Yoga Hosers (2016)
2.
  Holidays (2016)
3.
  Tusk (2014)
4.
  Red State (2011)
5.
  Cop Out (2010)
7.
  Clerks II (2006)
8.
  Jersey Girl (2004) Director
10.
  Dogma (1999) Director

CAST: (feature film)

3.
 Kingdom Come (2012)
5.
 Fanboys (2009)
6.
7.
8.
 TMNT (2007)
9.
10.
 Southland Tales (2006)
VIEW THE FULL FILMOGRAPHY

Milestones close milestones

1991:
Inspired to start a film career after seeing "Slacker," Richard Linklater's film about shiftless youth
1992:
Wrote script for "Clerks"
1994:
Debuted breakthrough film "Clerks" at Sundance Film Festival; Miramax acquired distribution rights; played character of Silent Bob alongside loudmouthed Jay (Jason Mewes)
1994:
Formed production company View Askew
1995:
Released second feature "Mallrats"; first affiliation with actor Ben Affleck
1996:
Signed deal with Carsey-Werner Productions to develop TV sitcom; deal fell apart after Jason Lee (star of "Mallrats") decided he did not want to do a sitcom
1996:
First producing credit (as executive producer) on a movie he did not direct, "Drawing Flies"
1997:
Helmed romantic comedy "Chasing Amy," starring Affleck, Lee, and then-girlfriend Joey Lauren Adams
1997:
Received co-executive producing credit on "Good Will Hunting" for his help getting the Matt Damon/Ben Affleck script made
1998:
<i>Clerks</i>, the Comic Book debuted, offering the continuing adventures of super slackers Dante and Randal
1998:
Rewrote screenplay for straight-to-video "Overnight Delivery"
1999:
Directed "Dogma," featuring Damon and Affleck; also reprised role of Silent Bob, the role he portrayed in his three previous directorial efforts
2000:
Executive produced, wrote, and voiced character of Silent Bob on animated "Clerks" (ABC)
2001:
Directed and co-starred with Jason Mewes in "Jay and Silent Bob Strike Back"
2004:
Helmed "Jersey Girl," which starred Ben Affleck and Liv Tyler
2006:
Returned to direct "Clerks ll," the sequel to 1994's "Clerks"; reprised role of Silent Bob alongside Mewes' Jay
2007:
Co-starred with Jennifer Garner in "Catch and Release," Susannah Grant's directorial debut
2007:
Co-starred in Richard Kelly's ensemble drama "Southland Tales"
2007:
Helmed "Zack and Miri Make a Porno," starring Seth Rogen and Elizabeth Banks
2010:
Directed buddy-cop comedy "Cop Out," starring Bruce Willis and Tracy Morgan
2011:
Wrote and directed his first action thriller "Red State"
2012:
Played supporting role in "For a Good Time, Call..."
VIEW ALL MILESTONES

Education

Henry Hudson High School: Highlands , New Jersey -
The New School for Social Research: New York , New York - 1988 - 1989
Vancouver Film School: Vancouver , British Columbia - 1990

Notes

Not to be confused with New Zealand actor Kevin Smith.

Smith owns the comics store Jay & Silent Bob's Secret Stash in Red Bank, New Jersey. The success of "Clerks" enabled him to buy back the "hawked" collection which had helped finance its making.

His website is www.viewaskew.com

Smith has written a series of comics "Jay & Silent Bob" (based on characters from his films) and "Clerks. (The Comic Book)" as well as teaming with artist Joe Quesada for six issues of Marvel Comics' "Daredevil" (Source: Entertainment Weekly, February 20-27, 1998.)

"Talk is cheap. Production values can come from unlikely sources, such as great dialogue. Special effects and amazing sets are not necessary. Get a strong script. If you're working on your first indie film, you're going to be forgiven for a lot. Don't bang your head against the wall getting it exactly right. Errors you see as blinding other people won't pick up at all." --Smith in The Hollywood Reporter, Independent Producers Special Issue, August 1995.

"Smith cracked up audiences during Q & A sessions after screenings, and charmed reporters. He demonstrated as much talent for dealing with media as Spike Lee and Quentin Tarantino. Smith's outrageous wit, warmth, self-deprecation and singular dress (wool trench coat with shorts) give him a unique and winning presence." --From Los Angeles Times, January 6, 1995.

Companions close complete companion listing

companion:
Joey Lauren Adams. Actor. Together from c. 1995 to 1997; appeared in "Mallrats" and "Chasing Amy".
wife:
Jennifer Schwalbach. Journalist. Born c. 1970; married on April 25, 1999 by a Catholic monk at Skywalker Ranch in California.

Family close complete family listing

father:
Donald Smith. Retired postal worker. Born c. 1936.
mother:
Grace Smith. Born c. 1949.
daughter:
Harley Quinn Smith. Born on June 26, 1999; mother, Jennifer Schwalbach.

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