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Richard Price

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Also Known As: Richard J Price, Rick Price Died:
Born: October 12, 1949 Cause of Death:
Birth Place: Bronx, New York, USA Profession: screenwriter, novelist, producer, actor, construction worker, teacher

Biography CLOSE THE FULL BIOGRAPHY

Sometimes dubbed "the voice of the Bronx", Price is primarily known for streetwise sagas like his 1976 novel "Blood Brothers" (filmed in 1978), a coming-of-age story set in the world of construction workers, and "The Wanderers" (published in 1974, filmed in 1979), a gritty look at the world of Bronx housing-project gangs. After both of these popular novels had been adapted for film, Price embarked on a successful career as an original screenwriter, notably with "The Color of Money" (1986), which earned him an Oscar nod, and the thoughtful crime drama-cum-character study "Sea of Love" (1989), which revitalized Al Pacino's film career.As a novelist and screenwriter, Price has favored stories about tough guys, losers, and people desperate for a second chance. His world view comfortably coincides with that of Martin Scorsese, with whom he collaborated on "The Color of Money", the "Life Lessons" segment of "New York Stories" (1989), and an ambitious extended Michael Jackson music video, "BAD" (1987).Several of Price's screenplays in the 1990s were high-profile remakes of film noir classics. Both "Night and the City" (1992) and "Kiss of Death" (1995) opened to mixed reviews and tepid box office. Price...

Sometimes dubbed "the voice of the Bronx", Price is primarily known for streetwise sagas like his 1976 novel "Blood Brothers" (filmed in 1978), a coming-of-age story set in the world of construction workers, and "The Wanderers" (published in 1974, filmed in 1979), a gritty look at the world of Bronx housing-project gangs. After both of these popular novels had been adapted for film, Price embarked on a successful career as an original screenwriter, notably with "The Color of Money" (1986), which earned him an Oscar nod, and the thoughtful crime drama-cum-character study "Sea of Love" (1989), which revitalized Al Pacino's film career.

As a novelist and screenwriter, Price has favored stories about tough guys, losers, and people desperate for a second chance. His world view comfortably coincides with that of Martin Scorsese, with whom he collaborated on "The Color of Money", the "Life Lessons" segment of "New York Stories" (1989), and an ambitious extended Michael Jackson music video, "BAD" (1987).

Several of Price's screenplays in the 1990s were high-profile remakes of film noir classics. Both "Night and the City" (1992) and "Kiss of Death" (1995) opened to mixed reviews and tepid box office. Price segued to producing as the executive producer on the unsuccessful romantic crime drama "Mad Dog and Glory" (1992), which he also scripted and appeared in. He also served as a co-producer on "Kiss of Death" and "Clockers" (both 1995). The latter was the hugely anticipated adaptation of Price's gritty fact-based 1991 novel of life amongst low-level Jersey City crack dealers.

Price was reportedly paid $1.9 million while "Clockers" was still in manuscript form ($1 million for the film rights; $900,000 to write a screenplay). Scorsese and De Niro were soon attached to the project but eventually dropped out to make Scorsese's "Casino". Writer-director Spike Lee came aboard and rewrote Price's script to emphasize the African American characters over the white policeman protagonist of the original. Lee's "Clockers" opened to respectful reviews and solid box office, though a number of reviewers quibbled about its deviations from Price's original story.

VIEW THE FULL BIOGRAPHY

Filmographyclose complete filmography

CAST: (feature film)

1.
 Bad 25 (2012)
2.
 Freedomland (2006)
3.
 Ransom (1996) Detective No 1
4.
 Kiss of Death (1995) City Clerk
5.
 Paper, The (1994) Himself
6.
 Mad Dog and Glory (1993) Detective In Restaurant
7.
 Night And The City (1992) Doctor
8.
 New York Stories (1989) Artist At Opening ("Life Lessons")
9.
 Arena Brains (1987) The Critic
10.
 The Color of Money (1986) Guy Who Calls Dud
VIEW THE FULL FILMOGRAPHY

Milestones close milestones

:
Raised in the Bronx; had a mild case of cerebral palsy while growing up
:
Sold his first short story to the literary magazine <i>Antaeus</i>
1973:
Completed his first novel <i>The Wanderers</i> (1974) at age 24
1973:
Began teaching at various East Coast colleges
1978:
First novel adapted to film, "Bloodbrothers"
1979:
First onscreen appearance, in "The Wanderers"
1986:
Co-wrote first original screenplay, "Streets of Gold"
1986:
First collaboration with Martin Scorsese, wrote and appeared in "The Color of Money"
1991:
Sold unpublished manuscript "Clockers" to Universal for $1.9 million
1993:
First film as executive producer, "Mad Dog and Glory"; also wrote and appeared in
1994:
Appeared as himself in Ron Howard's comedy-drama "The Paper"
1995:
Penned screenplay adaptation for "Clockers," directed by Spike Lee
1996:
Co-wrote the screenplay for the remake of "Ransom"
2000:
Contributed to the script of "Shaft," John Singelton's loose remake of the 1971 classic
2004:
Wrote for the HBO drama series "The Wire"
2006:
Wrote the screenplat for "Freedomland," a drama directed by Joe Roth and based on his novel of the same name
2012:
Created and executive-produced (with Robert De Niro, Jane Rosenthal, and Ken Sanzel) the CBS series "NYC 22"
VIEW ALL MILESTONES

Education

Bronx High School of Science: Bronx , New York -
Cornell University: Ithaca , New York - 1971
Stanford University: Stanford , California - 1973
Columbia University: New York , New York - 1976

Notes

Received Edith Mirrilees Grant in Fiction from Stanford University in 1972

Received grant from Mary Roberts Rhinehart Foundation in 1973

Received McDowell Colony Grant in 1973

Named as a Yaddo Fellow in 1977, 1978 and 1980

Received PLAYBOY Magazine Nonfiction Award in 1979

Named a MacDowell Fellow in 1979

"I guess I knew from the beginning--and I don't know where I got it from, except I would read novels and then see the films that were based on them--that you take your money and you take your chances. To have the illusion that if you do the screenplay you'll have any control over the finished product is tragic."--Richard Price (THE NEW YORK TIMES, August 31, 1979)

"In one way I have a very cartoon sense of manliness. I want to be a tough son of a bitch out of a comic book, which my father is not. . . . But all the men in my books are the opposite of my father. They are all like weight lifters. They all have handlebar mustaches, bulging pecs, and drink toenail wine. I go out of my way to do larger-than-life things--mainly through my writing, you know, creating 'macho-crotcho' guys."--Richard Price (MS. Magazine, September 1985)

"The strangest of all my movie house experiences had to be the night I sat in a huge theater and watched myself up on the screen in "The Wanderers". I was on for two minutes, playing a lounge lizard in a bowling alley. I talked, I sneered, and I got strangled with my own tie.

Sitting there, I felt absolutely no connection between myself on the screen and myself in the audience; no excitement, embarrassment, anger, or giddiness. I became so unnerved by the numbness of it all that I had to turn my head away from the screen, and in an effort to come back into myself, I put all my energy into watching the crowd watching me."--Richard Price (AMERICAN FILM, December 1982).

"[I] sat through three consecutive showings of "Mean Streets" one afternoon, then went home, rifled through a box of family photos, and started the first chapter of "Bloodbrothers" that same night."--Richard Price (AMERICAN FILM, December 1982)

Since 1975, Price has written essays and articles for ESQUIRE, PLAYBOY, ROLLING STONE, THE NEW YORK TIMES, AMERICAN FILM and THE VILLAGE VOICE

Price has lectured in English as a Second Language (Hostos Community College, 1973), Urban Affairs (NYU, 1973) and Creative Writing (SUNY Stonybrook, 1974-; NYU, 1974 and 1977; SUNY Binghamton, 1976; Hofstra University, 1978-79; and Yale, 1980).

In "Defusing the Urban 'Powder Keg'", an interview with Laurie Werner in "USA WEEKEND" (September 15-17, 1995) around the release date of "Clockers" (1995), Richard Price responded to a question about what he personally did to help inner-city youth.

"I've helped some, financially and in other ways. There have been offers that weren't accepted. But if kids ever came to me, I'd help in a second. And next year, I'm teaching a creative writing class at P.S. 22 in Jersey City. People have been very honest with me. You like to return the favors when you can."

Companions close complete companion listing

wife:
Judy Hudson. Artist.

Family close complete family listing

father:
Milton Price. Small store owner, cabdriver, window trimmer.
mother:
Harriet Price.
daughter:
Annie Morgan Price Hudson. Born c. 1985.
daughter:
Genevieve Price Hudson. Born c. 1987.
VIEW COMPLETE FAMILY LISTING

Bibliography close complete biography

"The Wanderers"
"Bloodbrothers"
"Ladies' Man"
"The Breaks" Simon & Schuster
"Clockers"
"Freedomland" Broadway Books
VIEW COMPLETE BIBLIOGRAPHY

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