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Also Known As: Edmond Dantes, John Hughes Jr. Died: August 6, 2009
Born: February 18, 1950 Cause of Death: heart attack
Birth Place: Lansing, Michigan, USA Profession: screenwriter, director, producer, joke writer, magazine writer, print editor, advertising copywriter, ad agency creative director

Biography CLOSE THE FULL BIOGRAPHY

A prolific writer, director and producer in the 1980s and early 1990s, John Hughes was the guiding force behind some of the most popular teen-oriented comedies of the period, including "National Lampoon's Vacation" (1983), "Sixteen Candles" (1984), "The Breakfast Club" (1985) and "Ferris Bueller's Day Off" (1986). Though his stock in trade was broad, he had a particular gift for the speech and emotions of middle-class suburban youth, who were portrayed in his films with a complexity and respect rarely afforded them in major Hollywood features. Hughes' popularity appeared to fall off after the blockbuster holiday hit "Home Alone" (1990), though he remained active as a screenwriter, often under his pen name of Edmond Dantes. His films were frequently cited as a major influence on writers and directors who toiled in the teen movie field.

A prolific writer, director and producer in the 1980s and early 1990s, John Hughes was the guiding force behind some of the most popular teen-oriented comedies of the period, including "National Lampoon's Vacation" (1983), "Sixteen Candles" (1984), "The Breakfast Club" (1985) and "Ferris Bueller's Day Off" (1986). Though his stock in trade was broad, he had a particular gift for the speech and emotions of middle-class suburban youth, who were portrayed in his films with a complexity and respect rarely afforded them in major Hollywood features. Hughes' popularity appeared to fall off after the blockbuster holiday hit "Home Alone" (1990), though he remained active as a screenwriter, often under his pen name of Edmond Dantes. His films were frequently cited as a major influence on writers and directors who toiled in the teen movie field.

Filmographyclose complete filmography

DIRECTOR:

1.
  Curly Sue (1991) Director
2.
  Uncle Buck (1989) Director
3.
  She's Having A Baby (1988) Director
5.
6.
  Breakfast Club, The (1985) Director
7.
  Weird Science (1985) Director
8.
  Sixteen Candles (1984) Director

CAST: (feature film)

VIEW THE FULL FILMOGRAPHY

Milestones close milestones

:
Started out as a joke writer for comedians (sold some to Rodney Dangerfield)
:
Worked as a ad copywriter in Chicago, which included campaigns for Johnson Floor Wax and the Edge shaving cream
:
Began writing full-time for the <i>National Lampoon</i> magazine
1982:
First screenplay credit, "National Lampoon's Class Reunion"
1983:
Scripted first hit film, "National Lampoon's Vacation"
1983:
Penned the screenplay for "Mr. Mom"
1984:
Directed first feature, "Sixteen Candles"; also wrote the screenplay; first collaboration with Molly Ringwald and Anthony Michael Hall
:
Founded his Chicago-based film company, Hughes Entertainment
1985:
Produced first film, "The Breakfast Club"; also wrote and directed; re-teamed with Molly Ringwald and Anthony Michael Hall
1985:
Wrote and directed the teen comedy, "Weird Science"; re-teamed with Anthony Michael Hall
1986:
Once again collaborated with Molly Ringwald for "Pretty in Pink"; wrote and produced; directed by Howard Deutch
1986:
Had another box-office success with "Ferris Bueller's Day Off"; wrote, directed and produced the film starring Matthew Broderick
1987:
Wrote and produced the screenplay for "Some Kind of Wonderful"; re-teamed with Howard Deutch who directed
1987:
Directed John Candy and Steve Martin in the comedy, "Planes, Trains and Automobiles"; also produced and scripted
1988:
Directed, wrote and produced the comedy film, "She's Having a Baby"
1988:
Re-teamed with John Candy for "The Great Outdoors"; wrote and produced the screenplay; directed by Howard Deutch
1989:
Wrote, produced and directed "Uncle Buck"; fifth collaboration with John Candy and first with Macaulay Culkin
1989:
Scripted "National Lampoon's Christmas Vacation"
1990:
Wrote and produced his biggest commercial success, "Home Alone"; re-teamed with Macaulay Culkin
1991:
Final collaboration with John Candy, "Only the Lonely"
1991:
Directed final film, "Curly Sue"
1992:
Returned to write and produce, "Home Alone 2: Lost in New York"; final film with Macaulay Culkin
1993:
Wrote the screenplay for "Dennis the Menace," a live-action film based on the Hank Ketcham comic strip of the same name
1994:
Adapted the original screenplay for the remake of "Miracle on 34th Street"
1996:
Wrote the adaptation for the live-action remake of "101 Dalmatians"
1997:
Returned to write and produce, "Home Alone 3"
1998:
Wrote and produced the independent film, "Reach The Rock"
2001:
Produced the first screenplay written by his son James Hughes, "New Port South"
2002:
Wrote the Jennifer Lopez comedy "Maid in Manhattan" (credited as Edmond Dantes)
2008:
Co-wrote final film, "Drillbit Taylor" (credited as Edmond Dantes)
VIEW ALL MILESTONES

Education

University of Arizona: Tucson , Arizona -
Glenbrook North High School: Northbrook , Illinois - 1968

Notes

Hughes described the genesis of the three "National Lampoon Vacation" films: "These are just simple truths about people and families. I happen to go for the simplest, most ordinary things. The extraordinary doesn't interest me. I'm not interested in psychotics. I'm interested in the person you don't expect to have a story. I like Mr. Everyman." --quoted in THE NEW YORK TIMES MAGAZINE, August 4, 1991

Hughes "may be the first real auteur of televison-style entertainment. He can write funny lines. He comes up with engagingly absurd situations. Yet there is something unnerving about the way he denatures real life." --Film critic Vincent Canby quoted in THE NEW YORK TIMES MAGAZINE, August 4, 1991

"In 1982, after his script for 'Mr. Mom', was taken out of his control by 20th Century Fox, a slight he recalls--as all others--with bitterness, Hughes decided he had to direct his scripts himself. There was one problem: he had no idea how to do it. He had never even been on a movie set. Logic led him to teen films. Because he didn't know how to move a camera, Hughes decided to write a movie that took place in a single room. And because he feared any experienced actor would know he was a fake, he decided to work with young actors. 'So I thought: "O.K., high-school detention,"' he says, and thus was born 'The Breakfast Club'...a semi-serious examination of teenage class structure. As it turned out, Hughes wound up directing a second script, 'Sixteen Candles' first." --Bill Carter (THE NEW YORK TIMES MAGAZINE, August 4, 1991)

"There were many satisfactions for John Hughes in the success of "Home Alone", some professional, some intensely personal. For a man, who, on the one hand, often says he has to keep proving himself, and who on the other has a marked antipathy toward official Hollywood and a wide reputation in the film industry as an irascible control freak, "Home Alone" has become a vehicle of validation. 'Nobody will ever say again a Hughes film doesn't open foreign,' Hughes says, armed with reports of further hundreds of millions in international gross receipts." --Bill Carter (THE NEW YORK TIMES MAGAZINE, August 4, 1991)

Companions close complete companion listing

wife:
Nancy Ludwig. Married c. 1970; was Hughes' high-school sweetheart.

Family close complete family listing

father:
John Hughes. Salesman.
son:
John Hughes III. Musician, composer, music executive. Born c. 1976.
son:
James Hughes. Screenwriter. Born c. 1979.

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