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Mark Webber

Mark Webber

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Also Known As: Died:
Born: July 19, 1980 Cause of Death:
Birth Place: Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA Profession: actor

Biography CLOSE THE FULL BIOGRAPHY

A sandy-haired and boyishly attractive performer from a disadvantaged and politically active background, Mark Webber went from so-called "shelter boy" to movie star with an acting career on the ascent since his 1997 debut in the Philadelphia-based gritty youth feature "Edge City." The son of a struggling single mother, Webber had a relatively normal childhood in his Minneapolis home until age ten when a perceived welfare fraud ended benefits, landed his mother in jail and left the two homeless. In 1990, mother and son relocated to Philadelphia, where they became noted activists for homeless causes and undertook a project that reclaimed abandoned government owned homes for the needy. Arrest, mistreatment by police officials and a subsequent successful lawsuit met the young man's efforts. This extensive real-life drama presumably had an effect on the actor, who proved a true natural, an emotionally available performer with a palpable drive and arresting charm. A veteran of high school and local stage productions, Webber made an auspicious big screen debut in Philadelphia director Eugene Martin's independent "Edge City," a gritty look at exploding tensions between city kids and their suburban...

A sandy-haired and boyishly attractive performer from a disadvantaged and politically active background, Mark Webber went from so-called "shelter boy" to movie star with an acting career on the ascent since his 1997 debut in the Philadelphia-based gritty youth feature "Edge City." The son of a struggling single mother, Webber had a relatively normal childhood in his Minneapolis home until age ten when a perceived welfare fraud ended benefits, landed his mother in jail and left the two homeless. In 1990, mother and son relocated to Philadelphia, where they became noted activists for homeless causes and undertook a project that reclaimed abandoned government owned homes for the needy. Arrest, mistreatment by police officials and a subsequent successful lawsuit met the young man's efforts. This extensive real-life drama presumably had an effect on the actor, who proved a true natural, an emotionally available performer with a palpable drive and arresting charm.

A veteran of high school and local stage productions, Webber made an auspicious big screen debut in Philadelphia director Eugene Martin's independent "Edge City," a gritty look at exploding tensions between city kids and their suburban counterparts hailed for its non-exploitative realism. The actor next took a role in the somewhat similarly themed Iowa-set "Whiteboys" (1999), an ambitious feature telling the story of a trio of hip-hop influenced farm boys who dream of hanging with rap artists and seek to prove their street cred as drug dealers in Chicago's notorious Cabrini Green housing project. Cast alongside fellow up and comers Danny Hoch and Dash Mihok, Webber played the most affluent of the group, a disaffected middle class teen. Next up for Webber was a supporting role in the teen romantic comedy "Drive Me Crazy" (also 1999). A starring vehicle for sitcom heavyweight Melissa Joan Hart, the movie suffered from dire predictability, but Webber's portrayal of 'Designated' Dave, a conscientious computer buff so-named for his willingness to drive friends home, was among the feature's highlights. He made his starring debut in the disappointing "Snow Day" (2000), playing Hal, a young lovestruck high schooler who sets out to use this weather-defined holiday to his romantic advantage. Webber's affable performance, though, couldn't save the formulaic, curiously unfunny film from box office failure.

While his early outings were less than stellar, Webber displayed a talent that would carry him through and no doubt offer a promising career. Further proof was provided by his turn as Bobby in David Mamet's classic "American Buffalo," staged in London at the famed Donmar Warehouse and in Off-Broadway in New York at the Atlantic Theater in 2000. Webber was roundly praised for his appropriately excitable take on this challenging role. The actor could next be seen with Laurel Holloman and Elise Neal in the World War II era coming-of-age drama "The Rising Place" (lensed 1999).

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Filmographyclose complete filmography

DIRECTOR:

1.
2.

CAST: (feature film)

1.
 Antibirth (2016)
2.
 Green Room (2015)
3.
 Uncanny (2015)
4.
 Ever After, The (2014)
5.
 Laggies (2014)
6.
 Angry Little God (2014)
7.
 Happy Christmas (2014)
8.
 Jessabelle (2014)
9.
 Goodbye World (2013)
VIEW THE FULL FILMOGRAPHY

Milestones close milestones

:
Lived in Minneapolis; briefly lived homeless
1990:
Moved to Philadelphia at age ten
:
Worked as a homeless activist
1997:
Film debut, "Edge City"
1999:
Appeared in the Marc Levin directed, "Whiteboyz"
1999:
Featured in the teen comedy "Drive Me Crazy"
2000:
Featured in the NY drama, "Boiler Room"
2000:
First leading role in a feature, "Snow Day"
2000:
Cast in David Mamet's "American Buffalo" at London's Donmar Warehouse and NYC's Atlantic Theater
2001:
Featured in the World War II drama "The Rising Place"
2002:
Acted in Woody Allen's "Hollywood Ending"
2002:
Made London stage debut in Neil LaBute's "The Distance from Here"
2005:
Starred with Anthony LaPaglia in the drama "Winter Solstice"
2007:
Co-starred in Ethan Hawke's adaptation of his own novel, "The Hottest State"
2008:
Co-starred with Rachel Miner in the independent, "The Memory Thief"
2010:
Co-starred opposite Michael Cera in the comic book adaptation "Scott Pilgrim vs. The World"
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Education

High School for the Creative and Performing Arts: Philadelphia , Pennsylvania -

Notes

Webber on his upbrining: "I'm so fortunate for the mother I have [activist Cheri Honkala]. Because of how she raised me, I don't need money or fame . . . And if I'm not working, I know how to live without money." --quoted in The Philadelphia Inquirer, February 13, 2000

"Edge City" director Eugene Martin on the effect Webber's underprivilieged upbringing has on his acting skills: "Mark has quick access to his emotions and really uses them. . . when you see him in these [middle-class] comedies, he's really acting." --quoted in The Philadelphia Inquirer, February 13, 2000

Family close complete family listing

mother:
Cheri Honkala. Activist, artist, teacher. Raised him as a single parent; a leading poverty activist.

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