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Neil Diamond

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Also Known As: Neil Leslie Diamond Died:
Born: January 24, 1941 Cause of Death:
Birth Place: Brooklyn, New York, USA Profession: singer, songwriter, actor

Biography CLOSE THE FULL BIOGRAPHY

An immensely talented singer-songwriter, Neil Diamond first penned hits like "I'm a Believer" for The Monkees as a Brill Building songwriter before scoring big with his own self-penned hits like "Solitary Man," "Cherry, Cherry," "Kentucky Woman," "Sweet Caroline," "Holly Holy" and "I Am I Said." A 1970s musical phenomenon, he hit No. 1 on the Billboard charts three times with "Cracklin' Rosie," "Song Sung Blue" and his duet with Barbra Streisand, "You Don't Bring Me Flowers." On the Hollywood front, he won a Grammy for writing the soundtrack for "Jonathan Livingston Seagull" (1973), and starred in "The Jazz Singer" (1980), whose soundtrack spawned the massive pop hits "Love on the Rocks," "Hello Again" and "America." Despite his unquestionable chops for writing enduringly popular, catchy songs, Diamond was often perceived as a little cheesy throughout the years. Time ultimately validated him, however, when acts like UB40 covered his "Red Red Wine," and director Quentin Tarantino scored a pivotal "Pulp Fiction" (1994) scene to Urge Overkill's cover of his "Girl, You'll Be a Woman Soon." Lovingly parodied by Will Ferrell on "Saturday Night Live' (NBC, 1975- ) and in "Saving Silverman" (2001), Diamond...

An immensely talented singer-songwriter, Neil Diamond first penned hits like "I'm a Believer" for The Monkees as a Brill Building songwriter before scoring big with his own self-penned hits like "Solitary Man," "Cherry, Cherry," "Kentucky Woman," "Sweet Caroline," "Holly Holy" and "I Am I Said." A 1970s musical phenomenon, he hit No. 1 on the Billboard charts three times with "Cracklin' Rosie," "Song Sung Blue" and his duet with Barbra Streisand, "You Don't Bring Me Flowers." On the Hollywood front, he won a Grammy for writing the soundtrack for "Jonathan Livingston Seagull" (1973), and starred in "The Jazz Singer" (1980), whose soundtrack spawned the massive pop hits "Love on the Rocks," "Hello Again" and "America." Despite his unquestionable chops for writing enduringly popular, catchy songs, Diamond was often perceived as a little cheesy throughout the years. Time ultimately validated him, however, when acts like UB40 covered his "Red Red Wine," and director Quentin Tarantino scored a pivotal "Pulp Fiction" (1994) scene to Urge Overkill's cover of his "Girl, You'll Be a Woman Soon." Lovingly parodied by Will Ferrell on "Saturday Night Live' (NBC, 1975- ) and in "Saving Silverman" (2001), Diamond was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 2010 and the next year won a Kennedy Center Honor. Guilty pleasure or not, Neil Diamond was a world-class singer-songwriter who crafted many of the world's most popular and enduring songs.

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Filmographyclose complete filmography

CAST: (feature film)

2.
 Saving Silverman (2001) Himself (Cameo Appearance)
3.
 Jazz Singer, The (1980) Jess Robin
4.
 The Last Waltz (1978)
6.
 42nd Annual Grammy Awards, The (2000) Presenter
7.
 ABC 2000 (1999)
VIEW THE FULL FILMOGRAPHY

Milestones close milestones

1956:
Wrote his first song "Here Them Bells" at 15
:
Dropped out during his junior year of college to work for Sunbeam Music on Manhattan's famous Tin Pan Alley
:
Rented a storage room in a printer's shop located above the famed Birdland nightclub on Broadway, where he lived and wrote songs
1965:
Made his <i>Billboard</i> Top 20 debut as a songwriter with the Jay and the Americans track "Sunday and Me"
1966:
Wrote the No. 1 song "I'm a Believer," recorded by The Monkees
1966:
Released his debut single as an artist, "Solitary Man"; peaked at No. 55 on the <i>Billboard</i> Hot 100 chart
1969:
Released his signature track "Sweet Caroline"; Diamond later said the song was inspired by John F. Kennedy's daughter Caroline
1970:
Moved to Los Angeles, CA
1971:
The single "I Am...I Said" reached the Top 5 in the U.S. and U.K. charts
1972:
Released the live double album "Hot August Night," recorded during his concert at the Greek Theatre in Los Angeles
1973:
Recorded the soundtrack for the film "Jonathan Livingston Seagull"; album landed at No. 2
1977:
Released second live double album recorded at the Greek Theatre, "Love at the Greek"; album featured appearances by Helen Reddy and Henry Winkler
1978:
Topped the <i>Billboard</i> Hot 100 with the Barbra Streisand duet "You Don't Bring Me Flowers"
1980:
Starred in first and only feature film of his career, playing a Jewish Cantor who dreams of becoming a pop star in "The Jazz Singer"; film was a remake of the 1927 Al Jolson classic; soundtrack featured the hits "America" and "Love on the Rocks"
1986:
Named by <i>Billboard</i> magazine as the most profitable performer of the year
:
Saw a career resurgence in the late 1990s and 2000s after "Sweet Caroline" played at various sporting events
1994:
Urge Overkill recorded a cover version of Diamond's "Girl You'll Be A Woman Soon" (1967) for the soundtrack of Quentin Tarantino-directed "Pulp Fiction"
2001:
Made a cameo (as himself) in the comedy feature "Saving Silverman," starring Jason Biggs and Jack Black
2002:
Appeared on "Saturday Night Live" (NBC) alongside Will Ferrell, who impersonated Diamond on the variety sketch show
2005:
Released the Rick Rubin-produced album "12 Songs"
2008:
Appeared on Fox's "American Idol" as a celebrity mentor
2009:
Named "MusiCares Person of the Year" by the National Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences
2011:
Inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame
2011:
Recipient of the Kennedy Center Honors
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Education

New York University: - 1958

Companions close complete companion listing

wife:
Jaye Posner. Divorced in 1967.
wife:
Marcia Murphey. Married in 1969; divorced in 1995.

Family close complete family listing

daughter:
Marjorie Diamond. Mother, Jaye Posner.
daughter:
Elyn Diamond. Mother, Jaye Posner.
son:
Jesse Diamond. Mother, Marcia Murphey.
son:
Micah Diamond. Mother, Marcia Murphey.
VIEW COMPLETE FAMILY LISTING

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