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Roger Deakins

Roger Deakins

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Also Known As: Roger A. Deakins Died:
Born: May 24, 1949 Cause of Death:
Birth Place: Devon, England, GB Profession: director of photography, camera operator, still photographer

Biography CLOSE THE FULL BIOGRAPHY

After starting out his career in documentaries, Roger Deakins became one of the few elite cinematographers of his generation, thanks in large part to his routine collaborations with filmmakers Joel and Ethan Coen. Ever since his Oscar-nominated camerawork on "Barton Fink" (1991), Deakins filmed some of the most remarkable images recorded on celluloid. Whether conveying the sweeping grandeur of hope taking flight from prison walls in "The Shawshank Redemption" (1994), capturing the isolated, brittle snowscape of "Fargo" (1996), or putting on display the vibrant spirituality of Tibet in "Kundun" (1997), Deakins created a visual style visual style that turned him into a cinematographer sought after by the top directors in the business, while also earning a slew of Academy Award nominations. His work was awarded numerous times, mostly for his stunning camerawork on Coen Brothers films such as "The Man Who Wasn't There" (2001), "No Country for Old Men" (2007) and "True Grit" (2010). He did, of course, branch out beyond the Coen Brothers universe where he earned further acclaim, most notably with "A Beautiful Mind" (2001), "House of Sand and Fog" (2003), "In the Valley of Elah" (2007), "The Reader" (2008)...

After starting out his career in documentaries, Roger Deakins became one of the few elite cinematographers of his generation, thanks in large part to his routine collaborations with filmmakers Joel and Ethan Coen. Ever since his Oscar-nominated camerawork on "Barton Fink" (1991), Deakins filmed some of the most remarkable images recorded on celluloid. Whether conveying the sweeping grandeur of hope taking flight from prison walls in "The Shawshank Redemption" (1994), capturing the isolated, brittle snowscape of "Fargo" (1996), or putting on display the vibrant spirituality of Tibet in "Kundun" (1997), Deakins created a visual style visual style that turned him into a cinematographer sought after by the top directors in the business, while also earning a slew of Academy Award nominations. His work was awarded numerous times, mostly for his stunning camerawork on Coen Brothers films such as "The Man Who Wasn't There" (2001), "No Country for Old Men" (2007) and "True Grit" (2010). He did, of course, branch out beyond the Coen Brothers universe where he earned further acclaim, most notably with "A Beautiful Mind" (2001), "House of Sand and Fog" (2003), "In the Valley of Elah" (2007), "The Reader" (2008) and "Skyfall" (2012). Because of his achievements and extraordinary work for over three decades, Deakins had earned the reputation as one of Hollywood's top cinematographers of all time.

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Filmographyclose complete filmography

CAST: (feature film)

1.
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Milestones close milestones

:
Raised in Devon, England
:
Attended an art college in Bath; studied graphic design and photography
:
Commissioned to create a photographic documentary of life in Torquay
1972:
Met future collaborator Michael Radford, while attending Film School
:
Shot first documentary, "Around the World With Ridgeway"
:
Traveled to Africa to film, "Zimbabwe" and "Eritrea ¿ Behind Enemy Lines"
1976:
Filmed the documentary feature, "Welcome to Britain" and the short film, "Empty Hand"
1977:
Director of photography for his first non-documentary, "Cruel Passion"
1983:
First collaboration with Michael Radford, "Another Place, Another Time"
1984:
Served as cinematographer on Radford's film version of "1984"
1986:
Director of photography for Alex Cox's "Sid and Nancy"
1987:
Re-teamed with Radford for "White Mischief"
1990:
American film debut as a cinematographer, "Mountains of the Moon"
1991:
First collaboration with the Coen brothers, "Barton Fink"
1994:
Earned first Academy Award nomination for his work on "The Shawshank Redemption"
1994:
Second film for the Coens, "The Hudsucker Proxy"
1996:
Re-teamed with the Coen brothers' for "Fargo"; earned second Academy Award nomination
1997:
Received third Academy Award nomination for Martin Scorsese's "Kundun"
2000:
Again teamed with the Coen brothers' for "O Brother, Where Art Thou?"; earned fourth Academy Award nomination
2001:
Re-teamed with the Coen brothers' for "The Man Who Wasn't There"; earned fifth Academy Award nomination
2001:
Was the cinematographer for Ron Howard's "A Beautiful Mind"
2003:
Shot the beautifully filmed, "House of Sand and Fog" for director Vadim Perelman
2005:
Filmed the Sam Mendes directed, "Jarhead"
2007:
Shot the film, "The Assassination of Jesse James by the Coward Robert Ford"; earned sixth Academy Award nomination
2007:
Again collaborated with the Coen brothers' for "No Country for Old Men"; earned seventh Academy Award nomination
2008:
Co-cinematographer for Stephen Daldry's "The Reader"; earned eighth Academy Award nomination
2008:
Was also the cinematographer for Sam Mendes' Revolutionary Road" and John Patrick Shanley's "Doubt"
2009:
Again collaborated with the Coen brothers' for "A Serious Man"
2010:
Teamed with the Coen brothers' for "True Grit"
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Education

Bath School of Art and Design: -
National Film and Television School: - 1972 - 1975

Notes

"['Kundun'] really isn't an epic; it's more of an intimate look at the life of an extraordinary person. During the prep period, Marty [director Martin Scorsese] and I talked about 'The Last Emperor' a bit, and how it was so vast and overpowering. I hope that our film is somehow more naturalistic and earthy. The story is really about the child, and it's seen primarily from his point of view. We generally didn't show much that he didn't experience firsthand. . . . As the Dalai Lama grows older, he becomes more aware of the political situation around him." --Roger Deakins quoted in AMERICAN CINEMATOGRAPHER, February 1998

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