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Yves Angelo

Yves Angelo

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Biography CLOSE THE FULL BIOGRAPHY

Yves Angelo parlayed a Cesar-winning career as a cinematographer into well-respected forays as writer and director on such dramas as "Grey Souls" (2006) and "Too Close to Our Son" (2015). Born January 22, 1956 in Morocco, Angelo studied at the Louis Lumiere National Film School before beginning his career behind the camera as assistant cameraman on Jeanne Moreau's 1979 directorial effort "The Adolescent." He continued as assistant cameraman and camera operator on several major features in the 1980s, including Bertrand Tavernier's "'Round Midnight" (1986) and Bruno Nuytten's "Camille Claudel" (1988) until making his debut as cinematographer on the offbeat horror comedy "Baxter" (1989). Angelo earned his first Cesar award for Alain Corneau's "Nocturne Indian" (1989), and would earn two more - for Corneau's "All the Mornings in the World" (1991) and Claude Berri's "Germinal" (1993) - soon after. In 1994, he made his debut as writer and director with "Colonel Chabert" (1994), a historical drama starring Gerard Depardieu, which earned a Cesar nomination for Best First Feature Film. Angelo then alternated between cinematographic duties on films like the Golden Lion-nominated "Stolen Life" (1998) and "The...

Yves Angelo parlayed a Cesar-winning career as a cinematographer into well-respected forays as writer and director on such dramas as "Grey Souls" (2006) and "Too Close to Our Son" (2015). Born January 22, 1956 in Morocco, Angelo studied at the Louis Lumiere National Film School before beginning his career behind the camera as assistant cameraman on Jeanne Moreau's 1979 directorial effort "The Adolescent." He continued as assistant cameraman and camera operator on several major features in the 1980s, including Bertrand Tavernier's "'Round Midnight" (1986) and Bruno Nuytten's "Camille Claudel" (1988) until making his debut as cinematographer on the offbeat horror comedy "Baxter" (1989). Angelo earned his first Cesar award for Alain Corneau's "Nocturne Indian" (1989), and would earn two more - for Corneau's "All the Mornings in the World" (1991) and Claude Berri's "Germinal" (1993) - soon after. In 1994, he made his debut as writer and director with "Colonel Chabert" (1994), a historical drama starring Gerard Depardieu, which earned a Cesar nomination for Best First Feature Film. Angelo then alternated between cinematographic duties on films like the Golden Lion-nominated "Stolen Life" (1998) and "The Second Wind" (2007) and occasional turns as writer-director, most notably the Cesar-nominated "Grey Souls" (2006) and the emotionally complex "Au plus près du soleil" ("Too Close to our Son," 2015), about a judge (Sylvie Testud) who discovers that the biological mother of her adopted son is having an affair with her husband (Gregory Gadebois).

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Filmographyclose complete filmography

DIRECTOR:

1.
3.
  Pas d'histoires! (12 regards sur le racisme au quotidien) (2001) Director ("Poitiers, Voiture 11/ Poitiers, Car 11")
4.
  Voleur de vie (1998) Director
5.
  Un Air Si Pur (1997) Director
6.
  Colonel Chabert (1994) Director

CAST: (feature film)

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Milestones close milestones

1979:
Made feature debut as camera operator on "The Adolescent"
1985:
Was assistant cameraman on "'Round Midnight"
1989:
Landed first cinematographer credit on "Baxter"
1989:
Won first Cesar for "Nocturne Indian"
1994:
Third Cesar for cinematography on "Germinal"
1994:
Made directorial debut with "Colonel Chabert"
1998:
Nominated for Golden Lion at Venice Film Festival for "Stolen Life"
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