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Michael Curtiz

Michael Curtiz

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Captain Blood... Errol Flynn shot to stardom as Peter Blood, a 17th-century physician turned... more info $7.99was $19.98 Buy Now

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Also Known As: Died: April 11, 1962
Born: December 24, 1888 Cause of Death: cancer
Birth Place: Budapest, HU Profession: Director ...
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MILESTONES

1897:
Made first stage appearance in an opera starring his mother
1906:
Ran away to join a traveling circus at age 17, performing with them as strongman, acrobat, juggler and mime
:
After completing studies, joined the Hungarian National Theatre, eventually working as actor and director
:
Reputedly was a member of the Hungarian fencing team at the 1912 Stockholm Olympic Games
1912:
Film directing debut (although no director credited), "Today and Tomorrow"; also played a leading role; film announced as 'The First Hungarian Dramatic Art Film'
:
Worked at Nordisk Studios in Denmark learning filmmaking techniques; assisted both Victor Sjostrom and Mauritz Stiller
1914:
Returned to Hungary
1914:
Directed at least 37 films, many of which--following the Scandinavian example--showed a preference for outdoor locations
:
Drafted into Austo-Hungarian artillery, but through use of connections obtained transfer to the film unit and then was discharged
1917:
Worked as managing director of Hungarian Phoenix Studios; helmed several films which starred first wife Lucy Doraine
1919:
Fled Hungary when Bela Kun's Communist regime nationalized film industry
:
Helmed at least 21 films for Sascha Films of Vienna, credited as Michael Kertesz
1923:
Directed the acclaimed "Sodom and Gomorrah", featuring Walter Slezak
1926:
Brought to Hollywood by Jack Warner who had been impressed by Curtiz's camera work for "Moon of Israel" (1924), produced by Alexander Korda; directed first US film, "The Third Degree"; first of eight collaborations with Warner Bros. star Dolores Costello
1929:
Scored substantial box-office success with "Noah's Ark"; Erich Wolfgang Kornholder provided the first of his six scores for the director
1932:
Directed Hollywood's first all-color horror film, "Doctor X"
1933:
Helmed the well-regarded, all-color horror flick "The Mystery of the Wax Museum"
1934:
First film with James Cagney, "Jimmy the Gent"
1935:
Initial collaboration with screenwriter Julius Epstein, "Little Big Shot"
1935:
Directed first film with Errol Flynn and Olivia de Havilland, "Captain Blood"
1936:
Reteamed Flynn and de Havilland in "The Charge of the Light Brigade"; climactic charge was then one of the most dangerous scenes ever filmed with one man dying, several more badly injured, and so many horses killed that the SPCA raised a public protest
1936:
First of 10 films with Claude Rains, "Stolen Holiday"
1937:
Directed "Kid Galahad", featuring a bravura performance by Edward G. Robinson as a ruthless (but ultimately soft-hearted) boxing manager
1938:
Reunited with Cagney for "Angels With Dirty Faces"
1938:
Helmed perhaps the finest swashbuckler, "The Adventures of Robin Hood", starring Flynn and de Havilland; Korngold earned his second Oscar for the film's score
1938:
First of five films with John Garfield, "Four Daughters"; Garfield's feature debut
1939:
Phillip G Epstein teamed with brother Julius on screenplay for "Daughters Courageous"
1939:
Directed the Academy Award-winning two-reel short "Sons of Liberty", a Warner Historical Featurette
1939:
Helmed "The Private Lives of Elizabeth and Essex", with Bette Davis and Errol Flynn
1941:
12th and last film with Flynn, "Dive Bomber"; director and star were barely speaking, and Flynn refused to work with Curtiz afterwards
1941:
Reteamed with Robinson for "The Sea Wolf", adapted from the Jack London novel
1942:
Fourth and last film with Cagney, "Yankee Doodle Dandy", superb biopic of George M Cohan which earned Cagney the Best Actor Oscar; scripted (with others) by the Epstein brothers
1943:
Last film with Costello, "This Is the Army"
1943:
Earned Best Director Academy Award for the classic Oscar-winning Best Picture "Casablanca"; the Epstein twins and Howard Koch picked up Best Adapted Screenplay statue as well
1944:
"Passage to Marseilles" reunited him with four from the "Casablanca" cast (Humphrey Bogart, Sidney Greenstreet, Peter Lorre and Rains)
1945:
Directed "Mildred Pierce", starring Joan Crawford who won a Best Actress Oscar
1947:
Formed Michael Curtiz Productions, an in-house company headquartered at Warner Bros.
1947:
Last film with Rains, "The Unsuspected"; initial movie made under the Michael Curtiz Productions banner
1948:
First of four films with Doris Day, "Romance on the High Seas"; marked Day's film debut
1949:
Final film from Michael Curtiz Productions, "Flamingo Road"; sold company to Warners, tired of exercising a nominal independence that gave final say to the studio
1950:
Fifth and final film with Garfield, "The Breaking Point", a remake of "To Have and Have Not" that was more faithful to the Hemingway novel
1952:
Fourth and last film with Day, "I'll See You in My Dreams", the formulaic musical biopic of Gus Kahn (played by Danny Thomas)
1954:
After almost 28 years, ended exclusive affiliation with Warner Bros.; asked to accept a 50 percent cut in pay, refused and quit studio; also embroiled at this time in a paternity suit with a young actress which ultimately went expensively against him
1954:
Enjoyed biggest commercial success of career, "White Christmas", for Paramount
1958:
Ninth and last film with de Havilland, "Proud Rebel"
1960:
Helmed "A Breath of Scandal", adapted from fellow Hungarian Ferenc Molnar's play "Olympia"
1961:
Directed last film, "The Comancheros", starring John Wayne
:
Honored posthumously with a career retrospective at New York's Museum of Modern Art entitled "Michael Curtiz: From Hungary to Hollywood"

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