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Torn Curtain DVD Paul Newman and Julie Andrews star in this taut political thriller directed by... more info $19.98was $19.98 Buy Now

Despicable Me DVD A dastardly villain discovers a soft spot in a heart he didn't know he had in... more info $22.98was $22.98 Buy Now

Thoroughly Modern Millie... Julie Andrews lights up the screen as the jovial Millie Dillmount in "Thoroughly... more info $14.98was $14.98 Buy Now

Victor/Victoria DVD Award-winning triple threat Julie Andrews brings one of her most celebrated film... more info $19.99was $19.99 Buy Now

Tooth Fairy DVD Dwayne "The Rock" Johnson dons a pair of fairy wings on his way to big laughs in... more info $14.98was $14.98 Buy Now

Cinderella (1957) DVD Finally seeing this one-night-only, live television version of Cinderella on DVD... more info $19.99was $19.99 Buy Now



Also Known As: Julie Andrews Edwards, Julia Walton, Julie Elizabeth Andrews, Julia Elizabeth Wells Died:
Born: October 1, 1935 Cause of Death:
Birth Place: Surrey, England, GB Profession: actor, singer, writer

Biography CLOSE THE FULL BIOGRAPHY

Singer-actress Julie Andrews came from humble beginnings on the English vaudeville circuit before going on to become one of the showbiz's brightest talents, and ultimately, one of entertainment's greatest living treasures. After a string of hit productions on Broadway - and being denied the opportunity to reprise her roles on film - Hollywood at last opened its doors to Andrews when she landed the lead in Walt Disney's "Mary Poppins" (1964). Her enchanting performance, combined with a stunning four-octave vocal range, won her an Oscar. Andrews followed with her career-making turn as the embodiment of kindness and sincerity, Maria Von Trapp, in "The Sound of Music" (1965). The record breaking film would remain one of the most successful and beloved movies of all time, gaining legions of fans for generations to come. As the Sixties came to a close, Andrews' professional output waned, although her personal life flourished with a marriage to director Blake Edwards. Andrews went on to score more cinematic hits with her director husband including "10" (1979) and "Victor/Victoria" (1982), as well as enjoy a respectable career as a children's book author. In a tragic bit of irony, the angelic-voiced actress...

Singer-actress Julie Andrews came from humble beginnings on the English vaudeville circuit before going on to become one of the showbiz's brightest talents, and ultimately, one of entertainment's greatest living treasures. After a string of hit productions on Broadway - and being denied the opportunity to reprise her roles on film - Hollywood at last opened its doors to Andrews when she landed the lead in Walt Disney's "Mary Poppins" (1964). Her enchanting performance, combined with a stunning four-octave vocal range, won her an Oscar. Andrews followed with her career-making turn as the embodiment of kindness and sincerity, Maria Von Trapp, in "The Sound of Music" (1965). The record breaking film would remain one of the most successful and beloved movies of all time, gaining legions of fans for generations to come. As the Sixties came to a close, Andrews' professional output waned, although her personal life flourished with a marriage to director Blake Edwards. Andrews went on to score more cinematic hits with her director husband including "10" (1979) and "Victor/Victoria" (1982), as well as enjoy a respectable career as a children's book author. In a tragic bit of irony, the angelic-voiced actress would lose her instrument after a botched throat operation in 1998. However, this did not prevent Andrews from winning over new audiences with turns in projects like "The Princess Diaries" (2001), or lending her still regal voice to the animated fairy tale romp, "Shrek 2" (2004). Through the years, Andrews came to epitomize the concepts of dignity, grace and rare talent - traits that endeared her to fans the world over for nearly 50 years.

VIEW THE FULL BIOGRAPHY

Filmographyclose complete filmography

CAST: (feature film)

1.
2.
 Despicable Me (2010)
3.
 Tooth Fairy (2010)
5.
 Enchanted (2007)
6.
 Shrek the Third (2007)
7.
 Shrek 2 (2004)
8.
 Princess Diaries 2: Royal Engagement, The (2004) Queen Clarisse Renaldi
9.
 Eloise at Christmastime (2003) Nanny
10.
 Eloise at the Plaza (2003) Nanny
VIEW THE FULL FILMOGRAPHY

Milestones close milestones

1945:
Began performing on stage with her parents, singing while her mother played the piano
1947:
Professional stage debut at the London Hippodrome as part of a musical revue called "Starlight Waltz"
1948:
Became the youngest solo performer ever to be seen in a Royal Command Variety Performance, at the London Palladium
1949:
First film credit, dubbing her voice for the English-language version of Italian animated film, "La rosa di Bagdad/The Rose of Bagdad"
1949:
Made her television debut on the BBC program "RadiOlympia Showtime"
1950:
Became a regular cast member on the BBC radio comedy show, "Educating Archie"
1954:
Made Broadway debut portraying Polly Browne in the successful London musical, "The Boy Friend"
1956:
Appeared with Bing Crosby in what is considered the first made-for-television movie, "High Tor" on CBS
1956:
Played Eliza Doolittle to Rex Harrison's Henry Higgins in the Broadway production of Lerner and Loewe's "My Fair Lady"
1957:
Featured in the Rodgers and Hammerstein television musical, "Cinderella"; aired live on CBS
1960:
Starred on Broadway as Guinevere to Richard Burton's King Arthur in Lerner and Loewe's "Camelot"
1962:
Co-starred in a CBS special with Carol Burnett which was taped at Carnegie Hall in New York
1964:
Played the title role in Disney's "Mary Poppins"; won Best Actress Academy Award
1964:
Acted opposite James Garner in "The Americanization of Emily"
1965:
Portrayed Maria von Trapp in Robert Wise's "The Sound of Music"; earned an Academy Award nomination for Best Actress
1965:
Earned an Emmy nomination for guest starring on the NBC-TV variety series, "The Andy Williams Show"
1965:
Appeared in the NBC color special, "The Julie Andrews Show," which featured Gene Kelly and The New Christy Minstrels as guests
1966:
Starred with Paul Newman in the Hitchcock thriller, "Torn Curtain"
1966:
First of back-to-back films with director George Roy Hill, "Hawaii"
1967:
Re-teamed with Hill for the musical, "Thoroughly Modern Millie"
1968:
Portrayed Gertrude Lawrence in Robert Wise's "Star!"
1970:
Acted in first of seven films directed by husband Blake Edwards, "Darling Lili"
1972:
Starred in her own television variety series, "The Julie Andrews Hour" on the ABC network; cancelled after one season
1974:
Second film with Edwards, "The Tamarind Seed"
1978:
Appeared with Jim Henson's the Muppets on a CBS-TV special, "Julie Andrews: One Step Into Spring"
1979:
Again directed by husband Blake Edwards in "10," also starring with Bo Derek and Dudley Moore
1981:
Appeared in Blake Edwards' "S.O.B."; famously appeared topless
1982:
Played duel roles of Victoria Grant and Count Victor Grezhinski in Edwards' "Victor/Victoria"; earned third Best Actress Academy Award nomination
1986:
Seventh and last feature with Edwards, "That's Life!"
1987:
Starred in an ABC holiday special, "Julie Andrews: The Sound Of Christmas"
1991:
Made her television dramatic debut in the ABC made-for-TV movie, "Our Sons"
1992:
Starred in the short-lived ABC sitcom, "Julie"
1992:
Last feature for eight years, Gene Saks' "A Fine Romance"
1993:
Returned to the NYC stage for a limited run at the Manhattan Theatre Club in the off-Broadway revue of Stephen Sondheim's "Putting It Together"
1995:
Returned to Broadway after 35 years to star in the stage musical version of "Victor/Victoria"; written and directed by Edwards
1996:
Declined nomination for Tony Award as Outstanding Actress in a Musical because she was sole nominee for "Victor/Victoria"
1998:
Recorded the speaking voice of Polly for the British stage musical, "Dr. Dolittle"
1999:
Re-teamed with James Garner for the CBS made-for-TV movie, "One Special Night"
2000:
Returned to features after eight years in "Relative Values," an adaptation of a Noel Coward play
2001:
Re-teamed with Christopher Plummer for live TV production of "On Golden Pond" (CBS)
2001:
Portrayed the Queen of Genovia in the Disney comedy, "The Princess Diaries"
2003:
Portrayed the nanny in two ABC made-for-television movies based on the Eloise books, "Eloise at the Plaza" and "Eloise at Christmastime"; earned an Emmy nomination for latter film
2003:
Directed a revival of "The Boy Friend," the musical in which she made her Broadway debut in 1954
2004:
Voiced Fiona's mother, the Queen, in the animated feature "Shrek 2"
2004:
Reprised role as Queen of Genovia in "The Princess Diaries 2: Royal Engagement"
2005:
Named the Official Ambassador for Disneyland's 18 month-long, 50th anniversary celebration, the "Happiest Homecoming on Earth"
2007:
Reprised role of the Queen for "Shrek the Third"
2007:
Narrated the Disney film, "Enchanted"
2008:
Published her autobiography, <i>Home: A Memoir of My Early Years</i>
2010:
Played the queen of all the tooth fairies in the comedy film, "The Tooth Fairy"
2010:
Voiced the character of Gru's Mom in the animated film "Despicable Me"
2010:
Earned a Grammy nomination for narrating <i>Julie Andrews' Collection Of Poems, Songs, And Lullabies</i>
VIEW ALL MILESTONES

Education

Woodbrook School: -
Cone-Ripman School: -

Notes

"Like a nun with a switchblade" --Christopher Plummer

Made a Dame of the British Empire in December 1999

Cindy Adams revealed in her January 8, 1993 column that Andrews is one of Great Britain's ten richest women.

She received the Woman of the Year Award from the Los Angeles Times in 1965.

Awarded an Honorary Doctorate of Fine Arts from the University of Maryland (1970)

Named Woman of the Year by B'nai B'rith Anti-Defamation League (1983)

Inducted into the Theater Hall of Fame in 1997

Andrews garnered headlines in May 1996 when she refused a Tony nomination as Best Actress in a Musical for "Victor/Victoria". Because she was the only person associated with the show who was cited by the nominating committee, Andrews chose to stand with the "egregiously overlooked" company and asked that her name be withdrawn. While Andrews' name remained on the ballot, she lost to Donna Murphy in "The King and I".

"Andrews won the Oscar mainly as a rebuke to Jack Warner for cheating her out of the Hepburn [Audrey] part in "My Fair Lady". Actually the old mogul's instincts were dead on, and we got the best of both worlds. Andrews could get away with Eliza Doolittle on stage, but the camera would have revealed her shamming trying to play Rex Harrison's social and intellectual inferior--she's about as socially insecure as a Sherman tank. Winsome, vulnerable Hepburn was just right for the movie--and the imperturbable Poppins was just right for Andrews' debut." --Michael Gebert in "The Encyclopedia of Movie Awards"

"We laugh about Mary Poppins and Maria and the corniness of all that, but you watch her in a room full of children who don't know "Mary Poppins" or "The Sound of Music" and, I mean, she's like a magnet. They just go right to her." --Blake Edwards quoted in Vanity Fair, October 1995.

Companions close complete companion listing

husband:
Tony Walton. Production designer, costume designer. Married on May 10, 1959; divorced on May 7, 1968; helped to create the designs for "Mary Poppins".
husband:
Blake Edwards. Director, producer, screenwriter. Married on November 12, 1969; has directed Andrews in several film and TV roles as well as in the stage adaptation of "Victor/Victoria".

Family close complete family listing

father:
Edward Wells. Teacher.
step-father:
Ted Andrews. Music hall performer.
mother:
Barbara Ward. Pianist. Divorced from Edward Wells and married Ted Andrews; with second husband and daughter toured as a trio in variety, pantomime and revue, as well as appearing on radio and TV.
daughter:
Emma Walton. Actor, artistic director. With Sybil Christopher operates Bay Street Theater; married to Steve Hamilton; mother of Andrews' first grandchild, Samuel David Hamilton, born in October 1996.
daughter:
Amy Leigh Edwards. Vietnamese orphan adopted with Blake Edwards; born c. 1974.
daughter:
Joanna Lynne Edwards. Vietnamese orphan adopted with Blake Edwards; born c. 1975.
VIEW COMPLETE FAMILY LISTING

Bibliography close complete biography

"Mandy" Harper & Row
"The Last of the Really Great Whangdoodles" Harper & Row
"Julie Andrews: The Story of a Star"
"Julie Andrews"
"Julie Andrews: A Bio-Bibliography" Greenwood Press
"Julie Andrews"
"Julie Andrews: A Life on Stage and Screen"
"Little Bo: The Story of Bonnie Boadicea" Hyperion
"Dumpy the Dump Truck"
VIEW COMPLETE BIBLIOGRAPHY

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