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A Connecticut Yankee In King Arthur's Court... Sing along with American icon Bing Crosby in this fantastic double feature! "A... more info $14.98was $14.98 Buy Now

On The Road With Bob Hope And Bing Crosby... "On The Road With Bob Hope and Bing Crosby" is a four film classic comedy... more info $19.98was $19.98 Buy Now

Road To Morocco DVD Bob Hope and Bing Crosby team up again with Dorothy Lamour for the third in... more info $14.98was $14.98 Buy Now

Bing Crosby: Screen Legend Collection... A wonderful, must-see collection for Crosby fans, including five classic... more info $19.98was $19.98 Buy Now

The Rat Pack Collection... Frank Sinatra and his swinging buddies team up for light-hearted thrills on the... more info $39.98was $39.98 Buy Now

Road To Utopia DVD After a three-year hiatus from the "Road" series of movies, Bob Hope and Bing... more info $14.98was $14.98 Buy Now

Also Known As: Harry Lillis Crosby Died: October 14, 1977
Born: May 3, 1903 Cause of Death: heart attack
Birth Place: Tacoma, Washington Profession: singer, actor, comedian, drummer, producer, businessman

Biography CLOSE THE FULL BIOGRAPHY

Popular crooner and durable boxoffice star of the 1930s, 40s and 50s who amassed one of the entertainment world's largest fortunes. Crosby made his screen debut as a band singer in "King of Jazz" (1930), but his most successful films were the "Road" movies with Bob Hope and Dorothy Lamour. Crosby's effortless baritone, caramel-mellow singing style, and his easy-going, self-mocking charm helped him endure while other, flashier talents faded around him. His escapist material both in song (with mostly a "Sunny Side of the Street/Pennies From Heaven" upbeat philosophy) and in reassuring, sentimental films--"Holiday Inn" (1942), "Going My Way" (1944), "The Bells of St. Mary's" (1945), "White Christmas" (1954) and "High Society" (1956)--helped audiences forget the Depression, WWII and its aftermath and account for his enormous popularity. Although he refused to play screen heavies, in the 1950s Crosby proved his skill as dramatic actor with his complex performance as a washed-up alcoholic singer in "The Country Girl" (1954); he played another alcoholic, this time a doctor, in the 1966 remake of "Stagecoach". Crosby co-authored an autobiography, "Call Me Lucky" in 1952, but his son Gary's scathing...

Popular crooner and durable boxoffice star of the 1930s, 40s and 50s who amassed one of the entertainment world's largest fortunes. Crosby made his screen debut as a band singer in "King of Jazz" (1930), but his most successful films were the "Road" movies with Bob Hope and Dorothy Lamour. Crosby's effortless baritone, caramel-mellow singing style, and his easy-going, self-mocking charm helped him endure while other, flashier talents faded around him. His escapist material both in song (with mostly a "Sunny Side of the Street/Pennies From Heaven" upbeat philosophy) and in reassuring, sentimental films--"Holiday Inn" (1942), "Going My Way" (1944), "The Bells of St. Mary's" (1945), "White Christmas" (1954) and "High Society" (1956)--helped audiences forget the Depression, WWII and its aftermath and account for his enormous popularity. Although he refused to play screen heavies, in the 1950s Crosby proved his skill as dramatic actor with his complex performance as a washed-up alcoholic singer in "The Country Girl" (1954); he played another alcoholic, this time a doctor, in the 1966 remake of "Stagecoach". Crosby co-authored an autobiography, "Call Me Lucky" in 1952, but his son Gary's scathing portrait of his father in "Going My Own Way" (1983) revealed a stern, unloving disciplinarian contrary to Crosby's easy-going public image.

VIEW THE FULL BIOGRAPHY

Filmographyclose complete filmography

CAST: (feature film)

1.
2.
 Entertaining the Troops (1989) Himself
3.
 Going Hollywood: The War Years (1983) Himself (Archival Footage)
4.
 It's Showtime (1976) Himself
5.
 That's Entertainment! (1974) Narration
6.
7.
 Dr. Cook's Garden (1970) Dr Leonard Cook
8.
 Stagecoach (1966) Doc Boone
9.
 Cinerama's Russian Adventure (1966) Narrator
10.
 Robin and the 7 Hoods (1964) Allen A. Dale
VIEW THE FULL FILMOGRAPHY

Milestones close milestones

1925:
Formed "Two Boys and a Piano" with piano player Al Rinker and left Spokane for Los Angeles
1927:
Hired with Rinker as a singing act for Paul Whiteman's band; later joined by Harry Barris and act called "The Rhythm Boys"
1930:
Film debut in "King of Jazz", spotlighting the Paul Whiteman Orchestra; Crosby appeared as one of the "Rhythm Boys"
1931:
Made radio debut with Gus Arnheim's orchestra at the Cocoanut Grove nightclub
:
Played romantic/comic/singing lead in several shorts produced by Mack Sennett in the early 1930s
1931:
Signed to CBS radio contract by William S. Paley when Paley heard record of Crosby singing, "I Surrender, Dear"
1932:
Appeared in film which made him a star, "The Big Broadcast"
1940:
Appeared in first of seven "Road" comedies opposite Bob Hope and Dorothy Lamour, "The Road to Singapore"
1944:
Enjoyed two of the biggest hits of his film career in the role of a priest, Father Chuck O'Malley, "Going My Way" and its sequel, "The Bells of St. Mary's"
1952:
Last "Road" film for a decade, "Road to Bali"
1962:
Reunited with Bob Hope and (in a cameo) Dorothy Lamour for a seventh "Road" picture, "Road to Hong Kong"
1966:
Last feature film, "Stagecoach"
1968:
Offered role of TV sleuth Columbo but turned it down
1977:
Collapsed and died of heart attack on golf course after a round of golf outside of Madrid
VIEW ALL MILESTONES

Education

Gonzaga University: Spokane , Washington -

Notes

"I don't think I would have been believable as Scrooge for a minute. Everybody knows I'm just a big good-natured slob." --Bing Crosby quoted in his The New York Times Obituary, October 15, 1977.

Acquired nickname, "Bing-o" when he was seven or eight years old, because of his fondness for a comic strip called "The Bingville Bugle". An alternate story is that Crosby annoyed at teacher with a wooden gun while shouting "Bing-Bing!" and the teacher began calling him "Bing-Bing" [Source: The New York Times obituary, October 15, 1977.

"Bing sings like all people think they sing in the shower." --Dinah Shore

Bing Crosby was the most popular film star of the 1940s. His appearances in the annual exhibitor's poll of the top 10 most popular stars are as follows: Number 7 in 1934, Number 4 in 1937, Number 7 in 1940, Number 4 in 1943, Number 1 for five years in a row from 1944 to 1948 (a feat only equalled by Burt Reynolds in 1978-82), Number 2 in 1949, Number 3 in 1950, Number 5 in 1951, Number 4 in 1952, Number 5 in 1953, and Number 8 in 1954.

As of 2000, he till held the number of most Number One hit records -- 38. (By comparison, Elvis Presley had 18 and The Beatles had 24.)

"I can't think of any better way for a golfer who sings for a living to finish the round." --wife Kathryn Crosby at news conference after Crosby's death

Received the William D. Richardson Memorial Trophy for his contributions to the game of golf (1950).

Helped establish and became president of the Del Mar race track in California (sold interest in 1946 for nearly half a million dollars).

Companions close complete companion listing

wife:
Dixie Lee. Actor. Married on September 29, 1930; died of cancer in 1952.
companion:
Joan Caulfield. Actor. Co-starred together in "Blue Skies" (1946) and "Variety Girl" and "Welcome Stranger" (both 1947).
companion:
Grace Kelly. Actor. Had relationship during filming of "The Country Girl".
companion:
Inger Stevens. Actor. Had relationship c. 1955-56.
wife:
Kathryn Grant. Actor. Married from 1957 until Crosby's death; born c. 1934.
VIEW COMPLETE COMPANION LISTING

Family close complete family listing

father:
Harry Lowe Crosby. Bookkeeper. Worked at local brewery.
mother:
Kate Crosby.
brother:
Everett Crosby.
brother:
Bob Crosby. Singer, bandleader. Born on August 23, 1913; youngest brother of six siblings.
son:
Gary Crosby. Actor, author. Born in 1934; wrote autobiography "Going My Own Way" (1983), which included a less-than-flattering portrait of his father; mother Dixie Lee; died of lung cancer on August 24, 1995.
son:
Dennis Crosby. Born in 1935; twin of Phillip; mother Dixie Lee; died of self-inflicted gunshot wound to head May 6, 1991; had joined his brothers in nightclub act during the late 1950s and early 60 and later worked in production capacity for Bing Crosby Productions Inc.
son:
Phillip Crosby. Born in 1935; twin of Dennis; mother Dixie Lee.
son:
Lindsay Crosby. Script reader. Born in 1938; died on December 12, 1989 of self-induced gun shot; mother Dixie Lee.
son:
Harry Crosby. Born in 1958; mother, Kathryn Grant.
daughter:
Mary Frances Crosby. Actor. Born in 1959; mother, Kathryn Grant; best remembered for playing the woman who shot J.R. Ewing in the long-running primetime TV soap, "Dallas".
son:
Nathaniel Crosby. Born in 1961; mother, Kathryn Grant.
VIEW COMPLETE FAMILY LISTING

Bibliography close complete biography

"Call Me Lucky" Simon & Schuster
"Bing Crosby: A Discography, Radio Program List and Filmography" McFarland
"Bing Crosby: A Pocketful of Dreams -- The Early Years 1903-1940" Little, Brown

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