skip navigation
Wally Cox

Wally Cox

  • Spencer's Mountain (1963) July 29 (ET) - Reminder REMINDER
  • Yellow Rolls-Royce, The (1964) August 08 (ET) - Reminder REMINDER
Up
Down

| VIEW ALL

TCM Messageboards
Post your comments here
ADD YOUR COMMENT>

share:

TCM Archive Materials VIEW ALL ARCHIVES (1)



Also Known As: Died: February 15, 1973
Born: December 6, 1924 Cause of Death: heart attack
Birth Place: Detroit, Michigan, USA Profession: Cast ...
RATE AND COMMENT

MILESTONES

:
Parents divorced when Cox was a youth
:
Moved from Detroit to NYC with mother and sister Eleanor
1942:
Enrolled in the City College of New York to study botany
:
Left school when mother striken by partial paralysis; became the family's primary breadwinner
:
Worked variously as a shoe-weaver, silversmith and puppeteer apprentice
:
Drafted into the army, sent for training to Camp Walters, Texas
:
Hospitalized from heat strokes; received honorable discharge after four months
1946:
Went into business for himself as a silversmith; made tie clasps, cuff links and shirt studs for NYC haberdashers; netted around $40 per week
:
Performed an informal comic monologue at a party; did an impression of a soldier he had once met
:
Began performing monologues regularly at parties
:
Influenced to act by his childhood friend and Greenwich Village roommate Marlon Brando; made other friends in the theater
:
Became affiliated with the American Creative Theater Group where the director advised him to shape his monologues into a nightclub act
1948:
In December, at a theatrical party, met Judy Freed who set up an audition with Max Gordon, owner of the Village Vanguard, a popular jazz cafe in NYC's Greenwich Village
1948:
Made nightclub performing debut at the Village Vanguard the same night he auditioned; initial one evening engagement extended into months
:
Took his act up to the Blue Angel in midtown Manhattan
:
Caught the attention of theatrical producer Dwight Deere Wiman who cast him in his new musical revue
1949:
Early TV appearance as a "student" on "School House", a comedy variety series on the DuMont network set in a schoolhouse
1950:
Broadway debut, "Dance Me A Song"
1950:
Hailed for his performance, received more than 20 offers for work in film, TV, theater and clubs by the time "Dance Me A Song" closed
1950:
Began undergoing psychoanalysis (date approximate)
1950:
Performed at the Plaza Hotel's Persian Room and on numerous TV and radio shows including those headlined by Perry Como, Ed Sullivan, Garry Moore and Arthur Godfrey (dates approximate)
1951:
Hosted his own NYC radio show on WNEW in October
1951:
Starred as a mild-mannered trouble-prone policeman in the "Philco Television Playhouse" production of David Swift's "The Copper" on NBC (date approximate); impressed the show's producer, Fred Coe, who began developing a pilot for a comedy vehicle
:
Starred as Robinson Peepers, a meek high school science teacher in the hit NBC sitcom, "Mr. Peepers"; performed live in front of a NYC studio audience; began as a summer replacement series
1953:
Began acting in summer theater productions playing the part of Irwin in "Three Men on a Horse"
1956:
Returned to nightclub work; heckled off the stage in Las Vegas; bowed out of the engagement after a few days
:
Starred as a mild-mannered proofreader with remarkable abilities in the short-lived (four months) sitcom, "The Adventures of Hiram Holiday"
1958:
Signed a seven-year, $50,000-a-year contract to develop special projects for NBC
1959:
Wrote a play, "Moonbirds", which closed after three performances
1962:
Feature debut, "State Fair"
1962:
Co-starred in the unfinished Marilyn Monroe comedy "Something's Got to Give" directed by George Cukor with Dean Martin and Cyd Charisse
1964:
Guest starred as a programmer of an amorous computer in "From Agnes--With Love", an episode of "The Twilight Zone"
:
Provided the voices of the humble "Shoeshine Boy" and his heroic alter-ego "Underdog" on the popular Saturday morning cartoon from producer Jay Ward
:
Became regular panelist (in the upper left "square") on the tic-tac-toe game show "Hollywood Squares"
1967:
Portrayed a scoutmaster in the TV-movie pilot for "Ironside"
:
Appeared in TV commercials for Jockey Shorts
1971:
Final film appearance, "The Barefoot Executive", a Disney satire of TV programming
1973:
Final TV-movie, "The Night Strangler"; played a librarian who assists reporter-cum-supernatural investigator Carl Kolchak (Darren McGavin)
1973:
Died of a heart attack in Bel Air; Brando flew in from Tahiti to handle the cremation

Please support TCMDB by adding to this information.

Click here to contribute