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Kevin Costner

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Also Known As: Kevin Michael Costner Died:
Born: January 18, 1955 Cause of Death:
Birth Place: Los Angeles, California, USA Profession: actor, producer, director, stage manager

Biography CLOSE THE FULL BIOGRAPHY

ma detailing the legendary feud between two 19th-Century families in the West Virginia-Kentucky region, it starred Costner as the head of the Hatfield clan and Bill Paxton as his hated enemy, Randolph McCoy. Not only was "Hatfield & McCoys" the History Channel¿s first scripted drama, it also became the channel¿s highest rated program ever at the time and earned the venerable Costner his first-ever Emmy Award and a Golden Globe.Emphasizing the simple family man side of the character, the film focused on Earp's early loss of a young wife and the effect this tragedy would have on his later career. Though some reviewers found the film self-indulgently long at over three hours, few found fault with Costner's performance. Meanwhile, family would again remain a strong theme in "The War" (1994), with the actor playing a returning Vietnam-era vet who seeks to build a better life for his wife and children. In a supporting role, Costner played a tortured soul trying to teach his young son the value of lessons he had learned during the war. Even with the Costner drawing power, however, neither 1994 release attracted much box office activity. He finished off the year as co-producer of the period adventure "Rapa...

ma detailing the legendary feud between two 19th-Century families in the West Virginia-Kentucky region, it starred Costner as the head of the Hatfield clan and Bill Paxton as his hated enemy, Randolph McCoy. Not only was "Hatfield & McCoys" the History Channel¿s first scripted drama, it also became the channel¿s highest rated program ever at the time and earned the venerable Costner his first-ever Emmy Award and a Golden Globe.Emphasizing the simple family man side of the character, the film focused on Earp's early loss of a young wife and the effect this tragedy would have on his later career. Though some reviewers found the film self-indulgently long at over three hours, few found fault with Costner's performance. Meanwhile, family would again remain a strong theme in "The War" (1994), with the actor playing a returning Vietnam-era vet who seeks to build a better life for his wife and children. In a supporting role, Costner played a tortured soul trying to teach his young son the value of lessons he had learned during the war. Even with the Costner drawing power, however, neither 1994 release attracted much box office activity. He finished off the year as co-producer of the period adventure "Rapa Nui," a box office flop directed by Kevin Reynolds.

Costner chose a sci-fi action epic for his next vehicle as a star-producer, reuniting with Reynolds for "Waterworld" (1995), a post-apocalyptic "Mad Max" on water. In it, he played the Mariner, a half-man/half-amphibian protagonist. After a memorably troubled shoot in the waters off Hawaii, plagued by delays and mishaps ¿ the most spectacular being the lavish set sinking to the bottom of the Pacific ¿ the production wrapped in early 1995. The budget reportedly soared as high as $180 million, making it the then-costliest film ever made. Industry wags were already referring to it as "Kevin's Gate" and "Fishtar" before post-production was even completed. Further complications arose when director Reynolds ended up quitting the film over creative differences with Costner just three months before the scheduled July 28 release date; reportedly, neither Costner nor MCA deemed the director's cut worthy of test screening as their deadline loomed. Although "Waterworld" was hardly the disaster predicted by industry insiders ¿ it earned a few respectable reviews and eventually broke even ¿ the film's disappointing returns and bad press were a smear on Costner's once-pristine track record.

Also putting a chink in Costner's armor were rumors of affairs with various women, causing his long-time devoted wife and mother to the couple's two daughters, Cindy Silva, to file for a divorce which was finalized in late 1994. Something about the specifics of their split ¿ her being his college sweetheart, sticking with him through his struggle to reach fame, bearing his children ¿ resonated negatively with Costner's female fans in light of the rumored affairs, leaving them seemingly cold overnight. The divorce was so scandalous at the time, it made the cover of People magazine. The couple would later make amends as friends, but at the time, the split was acrimonious and, along w/ the bad publicity surrounding "Waterworld," did much to tarnish his image as Hollywood's favorite Everyman.

Costner made a return to the slyly sexy rogues in Ron Shelton's golf-themed comedy, "Tin Cup" (1996), but the costly film just barely broke even. An even bigger disappointment was his second directorial effort, the three-hour would-be epic, "The Postman" (1997). Set in a post-apocalyptic future, the film was hurt by a misleading trailer and negative reviews; eventually becoming one of the highest-profile failures of 1997. The next several years saw Costner taking on a variety of roles, none of which served to give his career the boost that was needed after his damaging flops, including the mismatched romance, "Message in a Bottle" (1999) and yet another baseball film, "For the Love of the Game" (1999).

Costner received a reprieve from critics when his passion project detailing the Cuban Missile Crisis, "Thirteen Days" (2000), premiered to rave reviews, particularly for the actors uncannily playing the Kennedy brothers, Steven Culp (RFK) and Bruce Greenwood (JFK). Unfortunately, Costner, playing the brothers' political confidante, Kenny O'Donnell, did not fare as well, after opting to use a painfully hyperbolized "Bah-ston" accent. Regardless of that one misstep, after receiving some of the best reviews he had in years for shepherding through the Kevin Donaldson-helmed political thriller, Costner unfortunately followed up "13 Days" with the ill-advised action-comedy, "3000 Miles to Graceland" (2001) and forgettable thriller, "Dragonfly" (2002). Undaunted, Costner reached into his own pockets to co-finance his next movie, "Open Range" (2003), which he also directed. In it, Costner played the leader of a trio of free-range cattle drivers who run afoul of a hard-as-nails frontier sheriff. Though "Open Range" celebrated many of the traditions of classic Western films, the movie polarized critics. Many praised the film's respectful and deliberate pace, the old school iconography, and the climactic gunfight; others believed Costner's characteristic languid pace and adherence to tradition derailed the finer moments.

Costner's subsequent turn as yet another baseball player ¿ this time of the paunchy, retired variety ¿ in the dramedy, "The Upside of Anger" (2005), earned the actor some of his best acting notices in years. Costner next teamed with director Andrew Davis for the action drama, "The Guardian," a shallow imitation of director Taylor Hackford's far superior "An Officer and a Gentleman" (1982). While "The Guardian" awaited release, Costner was seen in "Rumor Has It," Rob Reiner's poor stab at remaking "The Graduate" (1967), and made yet another bid for a big-screen comeback, as the title character in the psychological thriller, "Mr. Brooks" A much better fit than the older man-romancing-Jennifer Aniston roles, Costner played against type as a possible serial killer who shares some sizzling screen time with William Hurt, a fellow Oscar winner and alum from "The Big Chill." Although critics were less than enthused about the film, Costner received mostly glowing notices for his take on serial killer with a conscience.

Costner pushed forward with more little-seen features, including "Swing Vote" (2008), a comedy-drama in which an entire U.S. presidential election literally comes down to the vote of one man (Costner). A direct-to-DVD thriller, "The New Daughter" (2009), attracted even less attention. Increasingly, Costner seemed to fair better in supporting roles, as opposed to the lead. Such was the case with "The Company Men" (2010), a well-received drama examining the then-current economic crisis in which Costner played the working-class brother-in-law of a recently laid-off executive (Ben Affleck). That same year, Costner made a bit of non-Hollywood news when it was reported that the oil conglomerate BP had purchased a number of oil-separation machines developed by the actor¿s ecological development company, Ocean Therapy Solutions, in an effort to stem the disastrous effects of the Deepwater Horizon oil spill earlier that spring.

In early February 2011, the entertainment world was rocked by the news of the sudden death of singer Whitney Houston, Costner¿s "Bodyguard" co-star. The victim of her own personal demons, Houston¿s passing was listed as "accidental," although a toxicology report later revealed several drugs, including cocaine, had been in her system at the time of death. A week later, Costner paid his respects to the influential pop diva at an invitation only service held in Newark, NJ and gave a moving eulogy that went viral within minutes. Costner went on to enjoy one of his biggest professional successes in recent years with the sweeping miniseries, "Hatfields & McCoys" (History Channel, 2012). A historical docudra

VIEW THE FULL BIOGRAPHY

Filmographyclose complete filmography

DIRECTOR:

1.
  Open Range (2003) Director
2.
  Postman, The (1997) Director
3.
  Dances With Wolves (1990) Lieutenant Dunbar

CAST: (feature film)

1.
 Molly's Game (2017)
3.
 Criminal (2016)
4.
 Hidden Figures (2016)
5.
 McFarland, USA (2015)
6.
8.
 Draft Day (2014)
9.
 Black or White (2014)
10.
 Man of Steel (2013)
VIEW THE FULL FILMOGRAPHY

Milestones close milestones

1974:
Made his film acting debut in "Sizzle Beach U.S.A.," though it was not released until 1986.
1978:
Appeared in the Costa Mesa Civic Playhouse's production of "Invitation to a March."
1978:
Having majored in marketing in college, he took a job with a marketing firm after graduation which he only stayed with for roughly 30 days.
1982:
Saw the release of his first feature film, "Night Shift."
1985:
Made his TV debut in an episode of Steven Spielberg's "Amazing Stories" called "The Mission."
1985:
Landed his first starring role in a feature film in Kasden's next film "Silverado."
1987:
Was cast in director Roger Donaldson¿s remake of the 1948 neo-noir thriller "No Way Out."
1988:
Formed TIG productions with director Jim Wilson.
1988:
Made his first appearance as the romantic male lead opposite Susan Sarandon in the baseball film "Bull Durham."
1990:
Made his debut as a producer with "Revenge" in which he co-starred with Anthony Quinn and Madeleine Stowe.
1991:
Played the title role in "Robin Hood: Prince of Thieves."
1992:
Played the title role opposite Whitney Houston in "The Bodyguard," a film scripted by longtime collaborator Lawrence Kasdan.
1993:
Cast as a mentally unbalanced escaped con who takes a young boy hostage in the Clint Eastwood-directed "A Perfect World."
1995:
Hosted the eight-hour CBS documentary series about Native American history entitled "500 Nations."
1996:
Featured in the golf-themed comedy "Tin Cup."
1997:
Directed his second feature, the box-office disappointment "The Postman."
1999:
Returned to the role of the romantic lead opposite Robin Wright Penn in "Message in a Bottle."
1999:
Played an aging baseball player reevaluating his life and career in "For the Love of the Game."
2000:
Portrayed a top adviser to John F. Kennedy in "Thirteen Days," set during the the Cuban Missile Crisis.
2001:
Co-starred with Kurt Russell in "3000 Miles From Graceland."
2003:
Directed and co-starred in the western drama "Open Range."
2005:
Played the love interest for Jennifer Aniston in Rob Reiner's "Rumor Has It..."
2005:
Played an alcoholic former baseball player opposite Joan Allen in Mike Binder's "The Upside of Anger."
2006:
Played a distressed Coast Guard rescuer, opposite Ashton Kutcher in "The Guardian."
2008:
Was cast as a lovable loser in the comedy "Swing Vote."
2010:
Played Ben Affleck's blue-collar working brother-in-law in John Wells' directing debut "The Company Men."
2012:
Starred in the Civil War miniseries "Hatfields & McCoys" on the History Channel."
2015:
Played real life football coach Jim White in the sports drama "McFarland, USA."
VIEW ALL MILESTONES

Education

Villa Park High School: Villa Park , California - 1973
California State University, Fullerton: Fullerton , California - 1978

Notes

"My wife is unlucky. Living with a sex symbol is complicated." --Kevin Costner in 1994

"It sounds vain, but I could probably make a difference for almost everyone I ever met if I chose to involve myself with them either professionally or personally." --Kevin Costner

"Kevin has been unfairly criticized for not being who people want him to be rather than for who he is." --director Ron Shelton quoted in US, March 1999

"My evolution as a single guy is on a real public stage. . . . I love living life with spontaneity. There will always be people who'll judge that." --Kevin Costner quoted in REDBOOK, March 1999

"What he does better than anyone else is to play an Everyman, but to play him in a really interesting way." --Phil Alden Robinson quoted in US, March 1999

Costner's three children appeared in both "Dances With Wolves" and "The Postman".

Costner owns a racehorse (three-years-old as of 2/93) named "Proudtobetogether" whose first outing was in Santa Anita, CA, on February 7, 1993.

He became a member of the Sioux Nation while filming "Dances With Wolves" in 1989.

He was given the Hollywood Women's Press Club's Golden Apple Award in 1991 for enhancing Hollywood's image.

Awarded the California State University's Distinguished Alumnus Award in 1992.

Companions close complete companion listing

wife:
Cindy Silva. Married in 1978; separated in October 1994; divorced.
companion:
Bridget Rooney. Reportedly involved with Costner briefly in 1996; mother of Costner's son Liam.
wife:
Christine Baumgarten. Model. Began dating in 1999; reportedly engaged as of spring 2000; no longer together; reconciled and engaged as of June 26, 2003; married September 25, 2004 at Costner's ranch in Aspen, Colorado.

Family close complete family listing

father:
Bill Costner. Power company worker.
mother:
Sharon Costner. Welfare worker.
brother:
Daniel Craig Costner. Born in November 1950; built the Midnight Star Casino in Deadwood, South Dakota with brother after "Dances With Wolves".
brother:
Mark Douglas Costner. Born on January 17, 1953; died on January 18, 1953; lived for only six hours.
daughter:
Annie Costner. Born on April 15, 1985; made feature debut in "The Baby-Sitters Club".
daughter:
Lily Costner. Born on August 4, 1986; made feature debut in "The Baby-Sitters Club".
son:
Joe T Costner. Born on January 13, 1988.
son:
Liam Rooney. Born in 1996; mother, Bridget Rooney.
VIEW COMPLETE FAMILY LISTING

Bibliography close complete biography

"Kevin Costner: The Unauthorized Biography" Icon Books

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