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Gary Cooper

Gary Cooper

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The Plainsman... Gary Copper plays Wild Bill Hickok and Jean Arthur is Calamity Jane in this... more info $14.98was $14.98 Buy Now

Unconquered... Discover the lavish spectacle, sizzling romance and intense drama of Cecil B.... more info $14.98was $14.98 Buy Now

Fox Western... This 3-disc collection of 20th Century Fox classics is sure to please even the... more info $19.98was $19.98 Buy Now

Sergeant York... Missles! Jets! Tanks! ...It's still the guy with guts and a gun who wins the... more info $26.98was $26.98 Buy Now

The... No Man Takes What's Mine!"Do you want to stand alone against the whole world?"... more info $5.99was $19.98 Buy Now

The Gary... Starring in over 100 films throughout his decades-long career, few American... more info $26.98was $26.98 Buy Now

Also Known As: Died: May 13, 1961
Born: May 7, 1901 Cause of Death: cancer
Birth Place: Helena, Montana, USA Profession: Cast ...
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MILESTONES

:
Born in and spent early childhood living in Montana
1910:
Moved to England with his mother and older brother
1917:
Returned to the USA
:
During the summers while in college, worked as a guide in Yellowstone National Park
1923:
Submitted many delightful cartoons and caricatures to the Helena (Montana) INDEPENDENT
1924:
Joined his parents in Los Angeles, hoping to interest local newspapers in his artistic abilities
:
Worked as stunt rider and extra in Westerns before making acting debut
1925:
Screen acting debut in "The Thundering Herd"
1926:
First came to attention as second lead in "The Winning of Barbara Worth"
1927:
Had walk-on as a reporter in "It", starring Clara Bow; first of four films in which both Bow and Cooper acted
1927:
Had first starring role in the silent "Arizona Bound" (locations shot in Bryce Canyon, Utah); did his own stunt work
1927:
Played a key role in William Wellman's "Wings", having one scene ("When your time comes, you're going to get it") before dying; audiences remembered him, and fan mail poured in
1928:
Reteamed with Wellman for second "flyboy" movie, "Legion of the Condemned"; first film with Fay Wray
1928:
First feature film with speaking part, "The Shopworn Angel"
1930:
Portrayed sardonic, independent soldier, too taciturn to spell out his love for Marlene Dietrich in Josef von Sternberg's "Morocco"
1931:
Starred opposite Claudette Colbert in "His Woman"
1932:
Essayed his first Hemingway character (Frederick Henry) opposite Helen Hayes in Frank Borzage's "A Farewell to Arms"
1933:
Played the White Knight in "Alice in Wonderland"
1933:
Fifth and last performance opposite Fay Wray in "One Sunday Afternoon"
1933:
Made stage debut at NYC's Paramount Theatre in skit directed by Ernst Lubitsch
1934:
First of seven features with director Henry Hathaway, "Now and Forever", co-starring Shirley Temple and Carole Lombard; association with Hathaway actually went back to several films directed by Victor Fleming on which Hathaway assisted
1936:
Reunited with Dietrich and Borzage for "Desire"
1936:
Received first of five Academy Award nominations as Best Actor for "Mr. Deeds Goes to Town", directed by Frank Capra and co-starring Jean Arthur
1937:
Starred opposite Arthur in "The Plainsman", the first of four films with director Cecil B. DeMille
1938:
Reteamed with Colbert for "Bluebeard's Eighth Wife"
1939:
US Treasury Department reported that Cooper was the nation's top wage earner at $482,819
1940:
Turned down the leading role in Alfred Hitchcock's "Foreign Correspondent" (Joel McCrea undertook the part)
1940:
Starred in William Wyler's "The Westerner", one of seven Cooper films in which Walter Brennan played a supporting role
1941:
Reunited with Capra for "Meet John Doe", starring opposite Barbara Stanwyck
1941:
Earned first Best Actor Oscar for Howard Hawks' "Sergeant York", the biopic of the WWI hero
1942:
Portrayed baseball great Lou Gehrig in "The Pride of the Yankees"; nominated for an Academy Award as Best Actor
1943:
Second time as Hemingway hero (Robert Jordan) in Sam Wood's "For Whom the Bell Tolls", opposite Ingrid Bergman; received fourth Best Actor Oscar nomination
1945:
Formed production company Cinema Artists for making of "Along Came Jones"; also producer
1945:
Romanced Bergman a second time in Wood's "Saratoga Trunk"
1946:
Offered credible turn as a nuclear scientist caught up in espionage in Fritz Lang's "Cloak and Dagger"
1947:
Played opposite Paulette Goddard in "Unconquered", the last of his over 50 films for Paramount; also marked final collaboration with DeMille
1947:
Testified as a "friendly witness" before the House Committee on Un-American Activities (HUAC), investing Communism in Hollywood
1949:
His undaunted naturalism contributed strongly to the success of King Vidor's "The Fountainhead", co-starring Patricia Neal; Ayn Rand scripted from her 1943 best-selling novel
1950:
Reteamed with Neal for "Bright Leaf"; only film with Lauren Bacall
1952:
Collected second Best Actor Oscar for his dignified, lone sheriff in "High Noon", a suspense Western revolving around the sheriff's crisis of conscience; written by Carl Foreman, it also operated as an allegory for the writer's difficulties with HUAC (he was an uncooperative witness) that led to his blacklisting; Cooper took a cut in salary for a percentage of the profits, marking the beginning of big star participation in movie-making; produced by Stanley Kramer
1953:
Reteamed with Stanwyck for offbeat "Blowing Wild"
1954:
Last of seven films directed by Henry Hathaway, "Garden of Evil", co-starring Susan Hayward and Richard Widmark
1955:
Suffered for his foresight as the title character of Otto Preminger's "The Court Martial of Billy Mitchell"
1955:
Made TV debut as guest on "The Steve Allen Show"
1956:
Played a Quaker drawn reluctantly into Civil War in Wyler's "Friendly Persuasion"
1956:
"Told" his memoirs to SATURDAY EVENING POST writer George Scullins, and they appeared in eight installments, entitled "Well, It Was This Way"
1957:
Romanced younger woman Audrey Hepburn in sparkling comedy "Love in the Afternoon", director Billy Wilder's first film co-written with I.A.L. Diamond
1958:
Formed Baroda Productions; first film "The Hanging Tree" (1959)
1958:
Converted to Roman Catholicism, the religion of his wife and daughter
1958:
Underwent treatment for an ulcer and had minor facial surgery
1959:
Acted in four films, including "The Wreck of the Mary Deare", directed by Michael Anderson
1960:
Had two major abdominal operations for stomach cancer
1961:
Narrated and appeared in the excellent documentary "The Real West", produced as part of NBC-TV's "Project 20" series; aired on March 26
1961:
Presented with honorary Oscar for lifetime achievement on April 17; accepted by longtime friend Jimmy Stewart because Cooper was too ill to attend
1961:
Last film, "The Naked Edge" (for Baroda), helmed by Michael Anderson; released posthumously
1968:
A nationwide televison popularity poll conducted by VARIETY still included Cooper and Clark Gable, though both had departed the scene nearly a decade before

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