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Samantha Morton

Samantha Morton

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Also Known As: Died:
Born: May 13, 1977 Cause of Death:
Birth Place: Nottingham, England, GB Profession: actor, screenwriter, poet

Biography CLOSE THE FULL BIOGRAPHY

Dynamic actress Samantha Morton so convincingly played American, Irish, Scottish and even mute, that fans of her international independent films may not have even known that she hailed from Northern England. An active player in British television dramas and classic literary screen adaptations since she was a teenager, most U.S. audiences first caught the actress in Woody Allen's "Sweet and Lowdown" (1999), playing a mute to silent perfection, for which she earned an Academy Award nomination for Best Supporting Actress. Known for her raw intensity, Morton delivered authentic portrayals of street savvy survivalists while exhibiting exceptionally high standards in selecting quality material. By the time she was 30 years old, Morton racked up nearly 20 film credits, including "Jesus' Son" (2000), "Morvern Callar" (2002), "Minority Report" (2002), in which she was one of the mystical "precogs, and "In America" (2003), a film that earned her a second Oscar nomination. In 2006, Morton portrayed one of England's most famous criminals in the prison drama "Longford" (HBO, 2006), which netted her more award nominations and a Golden Globe, affirming that the talented actress was capable of turning out superb...

Dynamic actress Samantha Morton so convincingly played American, Irish, Scottish and even mute, that fans of her international independent films may not have even known that she hailed from Northern England. An active player in British television dramas and classic literary screen adaptations since she was a teenager, most U.S. audiences first caught the actress in Woody Allen's "Sweet and Lowdown" (1999), playing a mute to silent perfection, for which she earned an Academy Award nomination for Best Supporting Actress. Known for her raw intensity, Morton delivered authentic portrayals of street savvy survivalists while exhibiting exceptionally high standards in selecting quality material. By the time she was 30 years old, Morton racked up nearly 20 film credits, including "Jesus' Son" (2000), "Morvern Callar" (2002), "Minority Report" (2002), in which she was one of the mystical "precogs, and "In America" (2003), a film that earned her a second Oscar nomination. In 2006, Morton portrayed one of England's most famous criminals in the prison drama "Longford" (HBO, 2006), which netted her more award nominations and a Golden Globe, affirming that the talented actress was capable of turning out superb performances in just about every role she played.

Samantha Morton was born on May 13, 1977, into a hardscrabble life in working class Nottingham, England. Her parents had a tumultuous split when she was young, and subsequently Morton and siblings were raised in a series of homes, including a foster home. A wildly imaginative and outspoken girl, she loved writing and performing short plays from the time she was seven years old. With the encouragement of a school drama teacher, she applied to the Junior Television workshop, a performing arts school, where she studied drama and playwriting from ages 13-16. When she was 16, the fiercely independent teen packed up and moved to London, emerging from a difficult and penniless period of time, determined to succeed as a professional actress.

At the same time Morton began to appear regularly onstage with the Royal Court Theater, she also landed an agent and, in a relatively quick amount of time, found herself on television in guest spots on prime time British dramas like "Peak Practice" and "Cracker." In 1995, she caught her first big break when she was cast as a troubled young prostitute in the miniseries "Band of Gold," a British production that also aired in the States on HBO. This led to a run of successful small screen roles in BBC/A&E period dramas including turns as the charmingly artless Harriet Smith in "Jane Austen's 'Emma'" (1997); in the title role of "Jane Eyre" (BBC/A&E, 1997); and as an especially staunch Sophia Western in the miniseries adaptation of "Tom Jones" (1998).

While her television work proved her a capable actress with a strong presence, more impressive were Morton's big screen roles. She debuted in "This Is the Sea" (1997), as a teenaged Protestant who falls in love with a Catholic boy from Belfast. But "Under the Skin" (1997) marked her breakthrough. As Iris Kelley, an endearing and needy girl who spirals into self-destructive sexual encounters following her mother's death, she delivered a critically-lauded, powerful and uncompromising performance in an often disturbing film. The film caught the attention of Woody Allen, who handpicked Morton to play a mute laundress and the great love of an egocentric guitarist (Sean Penn) in the jazz age drama, "Sweet and Lowdown." Morton earned a Best Supporting Actress Oscar nomination for her highly unusual and highly captivating performance.

The busy actress also played a feisty hostage in the comedy "The Last Yellow" and demonstrated her versatility by morphing into a 1970s Midwestern drug addict (opposite Billy Crudup) in the stark, affecting "Jesus' Son" (2000) - named one of the top 10 films of the year by The New York Times, The Los Angeles Times, and Roger Ebert. Then art imitated life when a pregnant Morton was cast as an expectant Sara Coleridge in Julien Temple's "Pandemonium" (2000). Morton's dedication to substantive, offbeat roles had kept her out of the mainstream multiplexes so far, but in the summer of 2002, she appeared opposite Tom Cruise as Agatha, one of a triumvirate of bald, semi-alien precognitives who predict future murders, in Steven Spielberg's blockbuster, "Minority Report." Later that year, she won the British Independent Film Best Actress Award for her starring role in "Morvern Callar," an introspective piece about a vacant supermarket checker who finds rebirth in the death of her boyfriend. Continuing to make a name for herself Stateside, the actress delivered a powerful, yet understated, performance in Jim Sheridan's emotionally gripping autobiographical film, "In America" (2003), playing the mother of a family of Irish immigrants struggling to establish themselves in New York City. Her sensitive, emotional portrayal earned her an Academy Award nomination for Best Actress in a Leading Role.

Following the Academy Awards nomination, the busy single mom was inundated with offers, but maintained her loyalty to well-written characters with an interesting point of view. Naturally, independent film remained the bulk of her work and her bread and butter. In 2004, she appeared in the adaptation of the British novel "Enduring Love" and the futuristic love story "Code 46," before taking on a role as a 17th century actress tutored by Johnny Depp in the racy but little-seen "The Libertine" (2005). In 2006, Morton starred as one of England's most notorious criminals, the Moors Murderess, in the TV film "Longford," scripted by Academy Award-winning scribe, Peter Morgan and co-starring Academy Award-winning actor, Jim Broadbent. "Longford" was named Official Selection for Best Dramatic Picture at Sundance in 2007, with Morton earning an Emmy nomination for Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Miniseries or Movie for her work in the project. She would also go on to win the Golden Globe for Best Supporting Actress in a Series, Miniseries or TV Movie in early 2008.

Morton's reputation continued to build up force with the well-received Cannes premiere of "Control," a biopic of ill-fated musician Ian Curtis of post-punk band Joy Division, in which Morton was cast as his wife. Later in 2007, Morton appeared in a supporting role as Mary Queen of Scots in "Elizabeth: The Golden Age," the sequel to "Elizabeth," as well as in "Mister Lonely," the latest offering from boldly experimental filmmaker Harmony Korine. She next had a supporting role in writer Charlie Kaufman's directorial debut, "Synecdoche, New York" (2008), playing a box office employee who bizarrely purchases a house that is perpetually on fire while striking up a romance with an eccentric playwright (Philip Seymour Hoffman). In "The Messenger" (2009), Morton was a wife grieving over the loss of her husband who had served in and died in Iraq, but finds the sergeant who delivered the news (Ben Foster) drawn to her. Morton earned an Independent Spirit Award nomination for Best Supporting Female for her performance.

VIEW THE FULL BIOGRAPHY

Filmographyclose complete filmography

DIRECTOR:

1.

CAST: (feature film)

1.
 Miss Julie (2014)
2.
 Her (2013)
3.
4.
 Harvest, The (2013)
5.
 John Carter (2012)
6.
 Daisy Chain, The (2010)
8.
 Messenger, The (2009)
9.
10.
 Expired (2007)
VIEW THE FULL FILMOGRAPHY

Milestones close milestones

:
Raised in Nottingham; put into foster care beginning when she was three years old
:
Began career in an acting workshop in Nottingham
1991:
First professional job at age 14; presented "Go Wild" a wildlife program
1991:
Acted in the serial "Soldier Soldier" as a sergeant's daughter
1994:
Breakthrough TV role on an episode of the British TV drama "Cracker"; played a young girl impregnated by the head of a religious cult
1994:
Earned acclaim for her stage performance alongside Susan Lynch and Melissa Wilson in "Ashes and Sand"
1995:
Co-starred as a teenage prostitute in the miniseries "Band of Gold" (HBO)
1997:
Breakthrough screen role in "Under the Skin"
1997:
Cast as Harriet Smith in the BBC/A&E adaptation of "Jane Austen's 'Emma'"
1997:
Landed title role in BBC/A&E production of "Jane Eyre"
1997:
Appeared in the Irish production "This Is the Sea" with Gabriel Byrne and Richard Harris
1998:
Co-starred as Sophia Western in the BBC/A&E miniseries "Tom Jones"
1999:
Starred as a headstrong woman in 1950s Britain torn between her love for her cousin (Rupert Graves) and her duty to her common law husband (Lee Ross) in "Dreaming of Joseph Lees"
1999:
Earned a Best Supporting Actress Oscar nomination for her performance as a mute laundress in Woody Allen's "Sweet and Lowdown"
1999:
Appeared as a heroin addict in "Jesus' Son"
1999:
Played a hostage kidnapped by two inept thieves in "The Last Yellow," co-starring Mark Addy and Charlie Creed-Miles
2000:
Portrayed a very pregnant Sara Hutchison Coleridge opposite Linus Roache's Samuel Taylor Coleridge in "Pandemonium"; directed by Julien Temple
2002:
Starred opposite Tom Cruise in Steven Spielberg's "Minority Report"
2002:
Starred in Lynn Ramsay's second feature as director "Morvern Callar"
2003:
Played Sarah, an Irish immigrant in the film "In America"; earned an Independent Spirit Award nomination and an Oscar nomination for Best Actress
2004:
Cast opposite Tim Robbins in futuristic love story "Code 46"
2004:
Co-starred with Daniel Craig and Rhys Ifans in the thriller "Enduring Love"
2006:
Cast as Sarah Carraclough in "Lassie," Charles Sturridge's film based on Eric Knight's classic 1938 novel
2007:
Portrayed Myra Hindley, a notorious child murderer in the HBO original movie "Longford"; earned an Emmy nomination for Best Supporting Actress in a Miniseries or Movie
2007:
Played Mary Queen of Scots in "Elizabeth: The Golden Age," the follow-up to "Elizabeth" (1998)
2008:
Featured in Charlie Kaufman's directorial debut, "Synecdoche, New York"
2009:
Co-starred with Ben Foster and Woody Harrelson in the drama "The Messenger"; earned an Independent Spirit Award nomination for Best Supporting Female
2009:
Nominated for the 2009 Independent Spirit Award for Best Supporting Female ("The Messenger")
2012:
Co-starred with Taylor Kitsch in sci-fi Western "John Carter"
VIEW ALL MILESTONES

Notes

"I want to portray people other people may not want to portray. I want to show the truth, not the garbage. Feel the fear and do it. That's my motto." --Samantha Morton to The New York Times, October 19, 1997

"I want to prove that you don't have to come from Oxford University or RADA, and you don't have to have parents that support you to succeed." --Morton quoted in Interview, June 1998

On filming "Sweet and Lowdown", Morton told the New York Post (September 7, 1999): "I had been warned that some of the people had ego politics, but that wasn't the case. Woody [Allen] treated me exactly as he treated Sean Penn. So I wasn't nervous.

"Woody is not quiet. He's an artist. He gets excited. He's constructively critical, so it makes you work better."

"She has a magnetism you can't ignore. She draws you in and you just can't look away." --"The Last Yellow" director Julian Farino quoted in the London Times, November 13, 1999

On playing Sophia in the TV version of "Tom Jones", Morton told Clive King in the London Times (November 13, 1999): "Every actor should be offered the opportunity to be versatile. I think people suddenly saw a different side to me. I knew I could do it and the producers believed in me. Sometimes people daren't go with you because you're a bit unexpected. They know they're going to get something, but they're not sure what."

"He feels so safe. If you've got a character of a depth that makes you afraid to go there, he's going to bring you back. He really is the daddy of film directors."-- Morton on working with director Steven Spielberg in Vogue (June 2002)

Companions close complete companion listing

companion:
Hans Matheson. Actor. Had two-year relationship c. 1995-97.
companion:
Charlie Creed-Miles. Actor. Born c. 1972; appeared together in "The Last Yellow" (1999); reportedly separated in 2000.

Family close complete family listing

father:
Peter Morton. Divorced from Morton's mother c. 1979; allegedly beat his daughter; remarried.
mother:
Pamela Morton. Factory worker. Divorced from Morton's father c. 1979; remarried.
step-mother:
Jane Morton. Reportedly worked as a prostitute.
daughter:
Esme Creed-Miles. Born on February 5, 2000.
VIEW COMPLETE FAMILY LISTING

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