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Also Known As: Raymond Albert Romano Died:
Born: December 21, 1957 Cause of Death:
Birth Place: Queens, New York, USA Profession: comedian, actor, screenwriter, bank teller, gas station attendant, futon delivery person

Biography CLOSE THE FULL BIOGRAPHY

In his early days as a stand-up comic, Ray Romano won over audiences with his New York accent and his deadpan delivery of domestic humor and observations. When he translated that accessible, everyday guy persona into a sitcom, he made television history with "Everybody Loves Raymond" (CBS, 1996-2005), one of the best loved, most critically acclaimed sitcoms of the era. A Top 10 ratings earner for over half of its nine-year run, the show's success was rooted in its outstanding ensemble cast and its relatable focus on the minutiae of family life, with adults taking center stage. The show transformed Romano into one of the top TV stars of the day, with a best-selling memoir and a Grammy-nominated comedy album to complete the picture. When he ventured out onto the big screen, however, it was hit-or-miss, with several failed attempts at buddy comedies and darker independent films but blockbuster success arrived in the shape of Manny the wooly mammoth who Romano amusingly voiced in the animated "Ice Age" franchise. In the wake of nearly a decade spent on the CBS sitcom he created, Romano branched out in 2010 with another primetime project, "Men of a Certain Age" (TNT, 2010). The hour-long comic drama...

In his early days as a stand-up comic, Ray Romano won over audiences with his New York accent and his deadpan delivery of domestic humor and observations. When he translated that accessible, everyday guy persona into a sitcom, he made television history with "Everybody Loves Raymond" (CBS, 1996-2005), one of the best loved, most critically acclaimed sitcoms of the era. A Top 10 ratings earner for over half of its nine-year run, the show's success was rooted in its outstanding ensemble cast and its relatable focus on the minutiae of family life, with adults taking center stage. The show transformed Romano into one of the top TV stars of the day, with a best-selling memoir and a Grammy-nominated comedy album to complete the picture. When he ventured out onto the big screen, however, it was hit-or-miss, with several failed attempts at buddy comedies and darker independent films but blockbuster success arrived in the shape of Manny the wooly mammoth who Romano amusingly voiced in the animated "Ice Age" franchise. In the wake of nearly a decade spent on the CBS sitcom he created, Romano branched out in 2010 with another primetime project, "Men of a Certain Age" (TNT, 2010). The hour-long comic drama proved that Romano could ably inhabit less autobiographical material than his previous hit, yet still draw in audiences with his intensely likable persona and timeless wit.

Romano was born in Queens, NY, on Dec. 21, 1957, and raised in middle class Forest Hills, where his was one of the few Italian families in a mostly Jewish neighborhood. That distinction and other childhood New York memories would prove to be an endless source of material when Romano began doing stand-up comedy. While still a teenager, Romano made his stage debut at a local playhouse along with a comedy troupe he had formed with some friends. After appearing in school and church plays, Romano began toying seriously with the idea of becoming an actor. After graduating high school in 1975, he worked odd jobs before deciding to pursue a career in accounting at Queens College. He graduated and went on to land a job as a bank teller -where he met and married his co-worker wife, Anna - but by 1987, he decided to make a full-time effort out of his nighttime appearances at comedy clubs. He already had a few years of working on his observational material and honing his "regular New Yorker" stage persona under his belt, so the comic jumped in with both feet. Within two years, Romano won a stand-up comedy competition held by a local New York radio station, earning $10,000 and invaluable exposure which helped him land his first agent.

National touring led to Romano's dream realized - an invitation to perform on "The Tonight Show" (NBC, 1954- ) for host Johnny Carson in 1991. He went on to be featured on HBO's "The 15th Annual Young Comedians Festival-Hosted by Dana Carvey" (HBO, 1992) and many other comedy showcases before he was hired as a writer and performer on Comedy Central's "Dr. Katz, Professional Therapist" (1995-99), an animated series where comedians showcased their material under the guise of venting to a psychologist. Following a well-received appearance on "The Late Show with David Letterman" (CBS, 1993- ) in 1995, Letterman approached Romano about developing a sitcom for his own production company, Worldwide Pants. Romano brought his writer friend Phil Rosenthal onboard and together the two built the show's premise from their own personal experiences, including characters based on Romano's divorced policeman brother who lived with his parents across the street from Romano on Long Island.

Real life sports fan Romano starred as a sportswriter married to a level headed wife (Patricia Heaton), long-suffering from her intrusive in-law neighbors - a meddling mother (Doris Roberts), garrulous father (Peter Boyle) and jealous older brother (Brad Garrett). Romano proved a highly likable calm at the center of a domestic storm, with the show's success also owing greatly to a strong supporting cast that gave the show more of an ensemble feel, with everyone given opportunities to shine. When "Everybody Loves Raymond" debuted in the fall of 1996, critics praised its performers, its tight writing, and its focus on the realistic minutiae of family life. However, its Friday night time slot was hardly a ratings grabber. A switch to Monday nights during the 1997-98 season proved just what the series needed, and the show built up an impressive audience, despite competition from major contenders "Monday Night Football" (ABC) and "Ally McBeal" (Fox, 1997-2002). Romano's "in-character" guest appearances as Ray Barone on other sitcoms, including "The King of Queens" (CBS, 1998-2007) and "The Nanny" (CBS, 1993-99), also helped generate interest in his wry New Yorker and wacky onscreen family.

The flourishing sitcom earned its first Emmy Award recognition in 1999, with an Outstanding Comedy Series nomination and Outstanding Actor nominations for Romano, Heaton, Roberts and Boyle. With this success, Romano relished the opportunity to return to his stand-up roots the same year, recording a live concert that was released as Ray Romano, Live at Carnegie Hall, which would later be nominated for a Grammy Award for Best Comedy Album. Romano's market saturation continued with the release of his memoir, Everything and a Kite, which hit No. 12 on The New York Times Bestseller list. With "Everyone Loves Raymond" hovering consistently in the Nielsen Top Ten, the show earned Emmy nods for Outstanding Comedy Series and Outstanding Writing in 2000 and 2001, as well as actor nods for most of the cast, but it was not until 2002 that Romano took home a statue for Outstanding Lead Actor in a Comedy. To make that year even sweeter, he also made his feature film debut, voicing lead character Manny the wooly mammoth in the computer-animated family blockbuster, "Ice Age."

In 2003, "Raymond" took home its first Emmy Award for Outstanding Comedy Series, and the cast was also honored with recognition from the Screen Actors Guild for Outstanding Performance by an Ensemble in a Comedy Series. With all the awards recognition, Romano decided to ramp up his screen career with his first onscreen starring role as a small town hardware store owner who runs for mayor against a former U.S. President (Gene Hackman) in the failed comedy, "Welcome to Mooseport" (2004). He also in appeared in a supporting role as the dimwitted uncle of an unhappy college student (Zo y Deschanel) who returns home to her hated family after the death of her grandfather (Rip Torn) in the low-budget black comedy, "Eulogy" (2004).

For the final 2004-05 season of "Raymond," Romano shared a second Outstanding Comedy Series Emmy with the show producers and left primetime on a high note, still in Nielsen's Top 10. In the wake of the series' finale - which was watched by millions - he remained rather low-profile than he had been in the past. He did reprise his role of Manny in the sequel "Ice Age: The Meltdown" (2006), which reunited Sid the sloth (John Leguizamo), Diego the saber-toothed tiger (Denis Leary) and Scrat the prehistoric squirrel (Chris Wedge) in a quest to find Manny a mate. Returning to stand-up comedy, Romano was seen in "95 Miles to Go" (2006), a road trip documentary that followed the comedian and his opening act, Tom Caltabiano, on an eight-day, thousand-mile tour through the American South. Romano and old friend Kevin James paired up in the buddy comedy "Grilled" (2006), a notably tasteless departure for the actor that thankfully went direct-to-video, and appeared alongside Winona Ryder and Wes Bentley in the dark indie comedy, "The Last Word" (2008).

As part of the ensemble cast of "Grand" (2008), Romano showcased his improvisation and poker skills with an all-star lineup of comic actors including Woody Harrelson, Cheryl Hines and David Cross. From that off-beat offering, Romano made a surprising primetime guest appearance as himself on an episode of the tween television staple "Hannah Montana" (Disney, 2006- ), as well as scored again at theaters with the third and 3-D sequel, "Ice Age: Dawn of the Dinosaurs" (2009). Meanwhile, Romano had been hard at work developing a new television series, "Men of a Certain Age" (TNT, 2009- ). The hour-long comic drama starred Romano, Andre Braugher and Scott Bakula as forty-something buddies dealing with varying middle-aged crises, though this time, the still-happily married Romano took on the role of a divorced dad of two.

VIEW THE FULL BIOGRAPHY

Filmographyclose complete filmography

CAST: (feature film)

3.
 Funny People (2009)
4.
 Last Word, The (2008)
5.
 Grand, The (2007)
6.
 Grilled (2006) Maurice Burns
7.
 95 Miles to Go (2006)
8.
9.
 Eulogy (2004) Skip Collins
10.
 Welcome to Mooseport (2004) Handy Harrison
VIEW THE FULL FILMOGRAPHY

Milestones close milestones

:
Performed in local comedy clubs in NYC
1987:
Began to pursue stand-up full-time
1989:
Won $10,000 in a stand-up competition
1991:
Appeared on "The Tonight Show Starring Johnny Carson" (NBC)
1992:
Featured on HBO's "The 15th Annual Young Comedians Special" hosted by Dana Carvey
1994:
Appeared on the "Late Show with David Letterman" (CBS)
1995:
Provided voice of recurring character on "Dr. Katz: Professional Therapist" (Comedy Central); was also a staff writer
1995:
Replaced by Joe Rogan on the NBC sitcom "NewsRadio" after two days of rehearsals
1996:
Starred in own special "HBO Half-Hour Comedy: Ray Romano"
1996:
Headlined own CBS sitcom "Everybody Loves Raymond"; also produced and wrote several episodes; earned Best Actor Emmy (1999, 2000, 2001, 2003, 2005), Golden Globe (2000, 2001) and SAG (2000, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005) nominations; also earned Emmy nominations for Producing (1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2004) and Writing (2000, 2005)
1998:
Guest starred on several episodes of "The King of Queens" (CBS) as his "Everybody Loves Raymond" character Ray Barone
2002:
Lent his voice to the character of Manny the Mammoth for the animated feature "The Ice Age"
2004:
Co-starred with Gene Hackman in the comedy "Welcome to Mooseport"
2004:
Starred in the black comedy "Eulogy," which followed three generations of a family who come together for the patriarch's funeral
2005:
Received an Emmy nomination for the comedy special "Everybody Loves Raymond: The Last Laugh" (CBS)
2006:
Again let his voice to Manny for the animated sequel "Ice Age: The Meltdown"
2009:
Reprised the role of Manny in "Ice Age: Dawn of the Dinosaurs"
2009:
Returned to television with lead role on TNT's "Men of a Certain Age," which he co-created with former "Everybody Loves Raymond" writer Mike Royce
2011:
Reunited with "Everybody Loves Raymond" co-star Patricia Heaton with a guest role on "The Middle." (ABC)
2012:
Reprised voice role of Manny the woolly mammoth in "Ice Age: Continental Drift"
VIEW ALL MILESTONES

Education

Archbishop Molloy High School: Briarwood , New York -
Thomas Edison High School: Jamaica , New York -
Queens College: Flushing , New York -
Hillcrest High School: Jamaica , New York - 1975

Notes

Ray Romano on the title of his sitcom "Everybody Loves Raymond": "I hated myself since I was born, but especially after the show got its title. That just increased my self-hate."---Romano quoted in Rolling Stone, October 17, 1996.

Asked by James Brady of Parade Magazine if he's happy now that "Everybody Loves Raymond" is a hit, Romano replied: "I'm never happy. I have to need something. I need to think the worst, not to become complacent. Are they getting tired of me? I need to worry. Other people have call-waiting, I have worry-waiting."---Romano quoted October 31, 1998.

"It takes going onstage hundreds of times. There's no shortcut. You just have to learn to do it. It takes time to learn how to perform, to know your style, your voice, how to pause, how to comment. If someone heckles you, if they don't laugh. There's a thousand things. It takes a lot of unnatural work to become a natural."---Romano on his work ethic, quoted in Daily News, September 8, 1999.

"When we talk, it all sounds real. That appeals to the audience, makes them feel like they're watching real people, dysfunctional but real people."---Romano on the success of "Everybody Loves Raymond" as quoted in People, February 21, 2000.

"Before the show I thought my cab driver hated me. Now I think my limo driver hates me. That's all. It's just a different level."---Ray Romano on how fame did nothing to cure his neurosis, quoted to People, May 17, 2005.

Companions close complete companion listing

wife:
Anna Romano. Married in 1987; born in 1963.

Family close complete family listing

father:
Albert Romano. Retired engineer.
mother:
Lucie Romano. Piano teacher.
brother:
Richard Romano. Policeman. Born in 1956; sergeant with the NYPD.
brother:
Robert Romano. Publicist. Born c. 1965.
daughter:
Alexandra Romano. Born in 1990.
son:
Matthew Romano. Twin of Gregory; born in 1993.
son:
Gregory Romano. Twin of Matthew; born in 1993.
son:
Joseph Raymond Romano. Born on February 16, 1998.
VIEW COMPLETE FAMILY LISTING

Bibliography close complete biography

"Everything and a Kite" Bantam Books

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