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Claudette Colbert

Claudette Colbert

  • She Married Her Boss (1935) September 10 (ET) - Reminder REMINDER
  • Skylark (1941) September 14 (ET) - Reminder REMINDER
  • It Happened One Night (1934) September 28 (ET) - Reminder REMINDER
  • Without Reservations (1946) October 04 (ET) - Reminder REMINDER
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Also Known As: Died: July 30, 1996
Born: September 13, 1903 Cause of Death: complications from a stroke
Birth Place: Paris, FR Profession: Cast ...
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MILESTONES

1912:
Moved from Paris to New York after father suffered financial reverses in the banking business
1919:
Made stage debut at the Provincetown Playhouse in "The Widow's Veil", written by her speech teacher, Alice Rossetter
1923:
Made Broadway stage debut in "The Wild Westcotts"
1925:
Replaced in leading role of Frederick Lonsdale's "The Fake"
1926:
Traveled to Paris; returned to New York to comply with five-year contract she had recently signed with producer Al Woods
1927:
Enjoyed major Broadway success as the female lead in "The Barker"
1927:
Film acting debut in the silent, "For the Love of Mike"
1928:
Film contract with First National aborted after failure of first film
1928:
Marriage to Norman Foster (in 1927) revealed by New York columnist
1928:
Journeyed with Foster to Paris to recreate their stage roles in "The Barker"
1928:
Signed film contract with Paramount which enabled her to continue stage career
1929:
Played leading roles in two unsuccessful plays by noted playwrights Eugene O'Neill ("Dynamo") and Elmer Rice ("See Naples and Die", her last stage appearance for over 20 years)
1929:
Made talking film debut in second film, "The Hole in the Wall"
1931:
Position in film industry elevated by success of Ernst Lubitsch's popular "The Smiling Lieutenant"
1932:
Briefly went off salary for refusing bland roles
1932:
Appeared in largest film to date: as Poppaea in Cecil B. DeMille's epic, "The Sign of the Cross"
1933:
Renegotiated contract with Paramount; allowed to appear in films at other studios
1934:
Enjoyed landmark career success in Frank Capra's popular and acclaimed Oscar-winner, "It Happened One Night" while on loan to Columbia
1934:
Signed new two-year contract with Paramount; earned $5000 per week
1935:
Co-starred opposite Fred MacMurray for the first of seven films together (in his first substantial lead) in the popular "The Gilded Lily"
1935:
Was named best-dressed actress in Hollywood
:
Made motion picture exhibitors poll of top ten boxoffice stars: 6th place in 1935 and 8th place in 1936
1936:
Plans to star as Joan of Arc in a film directed by Anatole Litvak fell through
1936:
Negotiated new contract with Paramount which called for seven films at $150,000 per film
1938:
Was the sixth top money-making woman in America with an income of $301,944 ($50,000 less than she had made the year before, when she placed fourteenth)
1939:
Starred in first color film, "Drums Along the Mohawk", directed by John Ford and co-starring Henry Fonda
1941:
Joined with Ronald Colman, Charles Boyer, Irene Dunne, Lewis Milestone and Anatole Litvak to form producing unit at Twentieth-Century Fox; Colbert starred in Fox film, "Remember the Day"
1944:
Played a mother with teen-aged daughters for the first time in David O. Selznick's acclaimed homefront saga, "Since You Went Away"
1945:
Left Paramount Pictures after having spent most of her starring career there; last film under contract, "Practically Yours"
1947:
Made motion picture exhibitor's poll of top ten box office stars; placed 9th
1948:
Replaced by Katharine Hepburn in leading role in "State of the Union" after disagreements with director Frank Capra
1950:
Replaced in leading role in "All About Eve" by Bette Davis after suffering severe back injury
1951:
Starred in last screen romantic comedy, "Let's Make It Legal"
1951:
Made TV debut on "The Jack Benny Show"
1951:
Announcments made that she would star in a TV series, "Leave It to Lizabeth"; filmed pilot, but backed out of series commitment
1951:
Starred opposite Noel Coward in successful stage presentation of "Island Fling/South Sea Bubble"
1952:
Traveled to England to star in "Outpost in Malaya"
1952:
Worked in Europe in film and theater; made fewer films, but starred in two in France
1954:
Made pact with CBS to star in five teleplays after successful appearance in "The Royal Family of Broadway"
1955:
Last starring role in an American feature film, "Texas Lady"
1956:
Replaced Margaret Sullavan in the female lead of the Broadway play, "Janus"
1958:
Returned to Broadway to originate a role after 27 years to star opposite Charles Boyer in the popular sex farce, "The Marriage Go-Round"
1959:
Last major acting role on TV for 25 years, in "The Bells of St. Mary's"
:
Hosted monthly CBS afternoon information series, "The Women"
1961:
One-shot return to films: played Troy Donahue's mother in the popular soap opera, "Parrish"
1963:
Appeared in Maxwell House Coffee TV commercials and billboard advertisements
1965:
Made last stage appearance for almost a decade, opposite Brian Ahearne in "Diplomatic Relations"
1969:
Announced that she was going to write a book entitled "How to Run a House" for her friend's Bennett Cerf's Random House Press; book did not materialize
1972:
Made rare public appearance at the "Fabulous Forties" nostalgia night at Manhattan's Roseland
1974:
Returned to the stage to appear in "A Community of Two" in Philadelphia
1978:
Returned to Broadway to star opposite Rex Harrison in "The Kingfisher"
1981:
Acted on Broadway in "A Talent for Murder"
1982:
Appeared on the American Film Institute's televised salute to Frank Capra
1984:
Received tribute for lifetime achievement from the Film Society of Lincoln Center
1984:
A building at the old Kaufman Astoria Studios in New York (where she had made her first films for Paramount) was renamed in her honor
:
Reunited in London and on Broadway with Rex Harrison in revival of Frederick Lonsdale's drawing-room comedy, "Aren't We All?"
1987:
Returned to TV to star opposite Ann-Margret in two-part film, "The Two Mrs. Grenvilles"
1991:
Career celebrated with ceremony and retrospective at New York University

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