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John Le CarrT

John Le CarrT

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Also Known As: David John Moore Cornwell, John Lecarr Died:
Born: October 19, 1931 Cause of Death:
Birth Place: Poole, Dorset, England, GB Profession:

Biography CLOSE THE FULL BIOGRAPHY

One of the world's most respected authors of spy fiction, John le Carré is a writer who gives his work added authenticity due to his time spent working for British intelligence agencies. Recruited by MI5 when he was still known as David Cornwell, he was still in college when he began spying on leftist groups that might have Soviet associations. He eventually joined the agency full-time and began moonlighting as a novelist, later transferring to MI6. After the success of his initial espionage books, which included Call for the Dead (1961) and A Murder of Quality (1962), le Carré shifted his career entirely to writing, and it wasn't long before adaptations of his stories hit the silver screen, beginning with director Martin Ritt's lauded "The Spy Who Came In from the Cold" (1965). Reliably producing a novel every few years - sometimes featuring his most famous protagonist, George Smiley, as with Tinker, Tailor, Soldier, Spy (1974) - le Carré remained perennially popular, though his profile was elevated during the new millennium, thanks in part to the acclaimed movies "The Constant Gardener" (2005) and "Tinker, Tailor, Soldier, Spy" (2011), as well as his continued and consistently exceptional literary...

One of the world's most respected authors of spy fiction, John le Carré is a writer who gives his work added authenticity due to his time spent working for British intelligence agencies. Recruited by MI5 when he was still known as David Cornwell, he was still in college when he began spying on leftist groups that might have Soviet associations. He eventually joined the agency full-time and began moonlighting as a novelist, later transferring to MI6. After the success of his initial espionage books, which included Call for the Dead (1961) and A Murder of Quality (1962), le Carré shifted his career entirely to writing, and it wasn't long before adaptations of his stories hit the silver screen, beginning with director Martin Ritt's lauded "The Spy Who Came In from the Cold" (1965). Reliably producing a novel every few years - sometimes featuring his most famous protagonist, George Smiley, as with Tinker, Tailor, Soldier, Spy (1974) - le Carré remained perennially popular, though his profile was elevated during the new millennium, thanks in part to the acclaimed movies "The Constant Gardener" (2005) and "Tinker, Tailor, Soldier, Spy" (2011), as well as his continued and consistently exceptional literary output.

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Filmographyclose complete filmography

CAST: (feature film)

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Milestones close milestones

1950:
Joined Intelligence Corps of the British Army, working as a German language interrogator in Austria
1952:
While studying at Lincoln College in Oxford, worked covertly for British Security Service MI5
1958:
Promoted to MI5 officer
1960:
Transferred to foreign-intelligence service MI6
1961:
Published first novel, <i>Call for the Dead</i>; introduced popular recurring character George Smiley
1962:
Published second novel, <i>A Murder of Quality</i>
1963:
Third novel, <i>The Spy Who Came In from the Cold</i>, became a worldwide bestseller
1964:
Left the service to work full-time as a novelist
1965:
<i>The Spy Who Came In from the Cold</i> adapted into feature film starring Richard Burton
1966:
<i>Call for the Dead</i> adapted into the Sidney Lumet thriller "The Deadly Affair"
1974:
George Smiley returned for <i>Tinker, Tailor, Soldier, Spy</i>, inspired by his experiences with British double agent Kim Philby
1979:
Novel inspired BBC miniseries "Tinker, Tailor, Soldier, Spy" with Alec Guinness as George Smiley
1982:
"Smiley's People," again starring Alec Guinness, became another BBC hit
1986:
Published most autobiographical novel <i>A Perfect Spy</i>
1990:
Feature release of "The Russia House," starring Sean Connery and Michelle Pfeiffer and based on the 1989 novel
2001:
Made feature producing debut with feature adaptation "The Tailor of Panama"
2005:
<i>The Constant Gardener</i> (2001) adapted into a feature by Fernando Meirelles and starring Ralph Fiennes and Rachel Weisz
2011:
Executive-produced feature adaptation of <i>Tinker, Tailor, Soldier, Spy</i> (1974), starring Gary Oldman as George Smiley; also made cameo as a party guest
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Education

Sherborne School: -

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