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Ehren Kruger

Ehren Kruger

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Also Known As: Died:
Born: October 5, 1972 Cause of Death:
Birth Place: Profession: screenwriter

Biography CLOSE THE FULL BIOGRAPHY

A versatile screenwriter with a knack for fast-paced action, realistic dialogue and wry humor, Ehren Kruger got his start on the small screen before making his feature debut with 1999's "Arlington Road". A former script assistant at Fox TV and Sandollar Productions, Kruger received his first screen credit with the 1998 USA Network TV-movie "Killers in the House", a nail-biting hostage drama in which a family is held in their own home by ruthless bank robbers. Next his 1996 Nicholl Fellowship-winning script for "Arlington Road" was produced in feature form. Directed by Mark Pellington, the film was both an action-packed thriller and a psychodrama, a disturbing look at the smiling evil of domestic terrorism and one man's struggle with potential paranoia. "Arlington Road" starred Jeff Bridges, Tim Robbins and Joan Cusack and opened with a portrait of mindless destruction that succeeds both as a momentary jolt and an image that haunts for the entire film. Kruger's script for the high-tech espionage drama "New World Disorder" never reached the big screen, but debuted on HBO. He lightened up a bit with his next feature foray, the last installment of the "Scream" trilogy. Faster paced, with more...

A versatile screenwriter with a knack for fast-paced action, realistic dialogue and wry humor, Ehren Kruger got his start on the small screen before making his feature debut with 1999's "Arlington Road". A former script assistant at Fox TV and Sandollar Productions, Kruger received his first screen credit with the 1998 USA Network TV-movie "Killers in the House", a nail-biting hostage drama in which a family is held in their own home by ruthless bank robbers. Next his 1996 Nicholl Fellowship-winning script for "Arlington Road" was produced in feature form. Directed by Mark Pellington, the film was both an action-packed thriller and a psychodrama, a disturbing look at the smiling evil of domestic terrorism and one man's struggle with potential paranoia. "Arlington Road" starred Jeff Bridges, Tim Robbins and Joan Cusack and opened with a portrait of mindless destruction that succeeds both as a momentary jolt and an image that haunts for the entire film. Kruger's script for the high-tech espionage drama "New World Disorder" never reached the big screen, but debuted on HBO. He lightened up a bit with his next feature foray, the last installment of the "Scream" trilogy. Faster paced, with more appropriate, less verbose dialogue and lots of surprises, "Scream 3" (2000) was a suitable sequel, capturing the former films' chills as well as tongue-in-cheek attitude, making fun not only of the horror genre as a whole, but the previous "Scream" entries specifically.

Audiences would next see the results of Kruger's work in John Frankenheimer's actioner "Reindeer Games" (2000), starring Ben Affleck, Gary Sinise and Charlize Theron. A cleverly scripted crime thriller with countless mistaken identity plot twists and an unforgettable climactic scene featuring Santa suit-clad gun-toting robbers, "Reindeer Games" had a good sense of humor and an enjoyably relentless pace, although its box office showing was much less exciting. Next his feature length script for the gripping futuristic sci-fi film "Impostor" (2000, originally shot as a 40-minute short) about a scientist accused of being an alien spy hit the big screen. In 2002, he contributed to the screenplay for the anticipated revisionist Western "Texas Rangers" A star-studded cast featuring James Van Der Beek and Dylan McDermott and its compelling real-life inspiration -- a 1875 band of teenage law enforcers -- would seem to indicate an audience pleaser. But constant delays in its release had wags wondering if the film would live up to the hype. Should it not do so, Kruger could take some comfort in the demand for his talents. Among the slate of projects to which his name was attached were a remake of the charming fantasy "Bell, Book and Candle", Wayne Wang's China/US government conspiracy gun-running thriller "Dragon Fire" and an adaptation of the oft-filmed John Buchan novel "The 39 Steps" to be directed by Robert Towne.

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Filmographyclose complete filmography

CAST: (feature film)

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Milestones close milestones

1996:
Earned a Nicholl Fellowship for his first script "Arlington Road"
1998:
Scripted first TV-movie "Killers in the House" (USA Network)
1999:
Penned the high-tech action film "New World Disorder" (aired on HBO)
1999:
Feature debut as screenwriter, "Arlington Road"
2000:
Penned the action thriller "Reindeer Games," starring Ben Affleck and Charlize Theron
2000:
Wrote the script for the horror sequel "Scream 3"
2001:
One of three credited screenwriters for "Impostor," starring Gary Sinise
2001:
Scripted the revisionist Western "Texas Rangers" (filmed in 1999)
2002:
Co-wrote the remake of the Japanese horror film "The Ring"; directed by Gore Verbinski
2005:
Scripted "The Ring Two"
2005:
Penned the horror film "Skeleton Key," starring Kate Hudson, Gena Rowlands and John Hurt
2005:
Wrote the Terry Gilliam directed film "The Brothers Grimm"
2009:
Co-wrote the sci-fi action film "Transformers: Revenge of the Fallen"; directed by Michael Bay
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Education

New York University: New York , New York -

Notes

Received a Nicholl Fellowship in screenwriting from the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences in 1996.

Ehren Kruger on Hollywood: "As soon as I got my first check as a writer, I blew town." --quoted in Variety, August 31- September 6, 1998

"I hope the sense of foreboding and unease in an atmosphere that seems safe and sound comes through.

"One movie [director Mark] Pellington and I talked a lot about was 'Rosemary's Baby'. That's not how I originally envisioned the film, but the more we spoke, the more we realized that 'Arklington Raod' was more a suburban horror movie than a traditional genre thriller." -- Kruger on "Arlington Road", quoted in Time Out New York, July 8-15, 1999

Kruger on the right-wing militants that terrorize "Arlington Road": "I wanted to see where their frustrations are coming from, and the economics behind their views. I didn't simply want to make the neighbor-from-hell movie." --quoted in Time Out New York, July 8-15, 1999

Ehren Kruger on his success: "I only feel like a celebrity in the bad sense. Now, if a movie does well, my friends and family will call me. But if it doesn't, they won't call at all." --quoted in Entertainment Weekly, March 31, 2000

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