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John Cleese

John Cleese

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Also Known As: Died:
Born: October 27, 1939 Cause of Death:
Birth Place: Somerset, England, GB Profession: Cast ...
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NOTES

See Eric Idle for additional background information on Monty Python's Flying Circus.

"In October (1988), Cleese gave about $140,000 to Sussex University to finance a three-year study into the psychological phenomenon of projection and denial--the tendency for people to deny that a problem is caused by themselves, and to project the blame onto someone else. . . . Cleese will own the copyright on the research and hopes to eventually write a book with Robin Skynner on the topic." --From "Cleese Up Close" by Bill Bryson in The New York Times Magazine, December 25, 1988.

"Cleese has spent much of his career playing with devastating effect seething, angry, mentally volcanic characters who if they are pushed just one more inch will erupt in a ranting, fist-shaking, quavering rage--and then, of course, are pushed that one inch. So many people find it difficult to accept the idea that in person he is composure itself: quiet, thoughtful, attentive, not at all given to stomping his feet, beating his head against walls, smacking menials or dashing around in a state of semi-hysteria." --From "Cleese Up Close" by Bill Bryson in The New York Times Magazine, December 25, 1988.

"Cleese's humor has always been built around those characteristics that most set the English apart--a sense of decorum, class rigidities, suppressed emotions, a fondness for the lilt and flow of words and, above all, an instinctive delight in the absurd." --From "Cleese Up Close" in The New York Times Magazine, December 25, 1988.

Cleese's company, Video Arts Ltd., won the prestigious Queen's Award for Industry in 1981.

About his lack of singing ability: "I'm the most unmusical man in Europe. I once did a Broadway musical ('Half a Sixpence') and I was only allowed to mime. It was in 1965 and it was only a small role. But after about six weeks, I just started joining in very quietly, and about two performancwes later, the musical director came up and said, 'John?' I said, 'Yes, sir?' 'Are you singing?' I said, 'Just a little.' He said, 'Don't!'" --Cleese, in "Idol Chatter", Premiere, January 1997.

On American attempts to duplicate "Fawlty Towers": "The advantage to 'Fawlty' was that I was able to do . . . slightly over a half hour. This gave me a lot of time to build the tension, and get Basil more and more frantic.

"Now as I told the ['Payne'] writers, it's going to be very hard to get him wound up to that peak of madness in only 22 minutes, so you've immediately got a problem."

As for ABC's short-lived "Amanda's", starring Bea Arthur: "This ['Amanda's'] was a very strange business . . . They wrote Basil out. If you take him away, and have a woman play his part, the dynamic is all wrong." --Cleese to The Chicago Sun-Times, March 26, 1998.

"The only way to understand 'Monty Python' was that it was six writers who happened to perform their own material. And the reason you can tell is because we used to fight like cats and dogs about relative merit of material. Terrible fights. We never, ever fought about the acting. Nobody was ever cross about not getting a part. It didn't matter. What mattered was getting the material right. We were almost a bit Puritan about it." --Cleese quoted in USA Today, February 16, 1999.

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