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Queen Latifah

Queen Latifah

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Also Known As: Dana Owens, Dana Elaine Owens Died:
Born: March 18, 1970 Cause of Death:
Birth Place: Newark, New Jersey, USA Profession: rapper, actor, executive, entrepreneur, fast food worker, cashier, salesperson

Biography CLOSE THE FULL BIOGRAPHY

ke. She was honored with Golden Globe, Oscar, BAFTA, and BET Award nominations among others, and followed up with a dual role as executive producer and star of "Bringing Down the House" (2003), in which she played opposite Steve Martin as a recently released inmate who hooks up with a dull exec via an online dating service. Critics massacred the broad comedy, which also took hits for Latifah's stereotypical urban character, but audiences ate it up to the tune of $136 million at the box office. Latifah regained the respect of critics with her 2004 release The Dana Owens Album," a further musical departure and Grammy-winning success (in the Jazz category) that proudly showcased Latifah's powerful vocals on a selection of soul and jazz standards.On the big screen, Latifah still gravitated towards outrageous, broad comedies for the young African-American demographic, taking on a small but scene-stealing role in "Barbershop 2: Back In Business" (2004), which led to her leading role in the female-centric spin-off, "Beauty Shop" (2005). Increasing her involvement in film production through Flavor Unit's film house, she co-wrote, co-produced and co-starred as an overzealous security guard in the uninspired...

ke. She was honored with Golden Globe, Oscar, BAFTA, and BET Award nominations among others, and followed up with a dual role as executive producer and star of "Bringing Down the House" (2003), in which she played opposite Steve Martin as a recently released inmate who hooks up with a dull exec via an online dating service. Critics massacred the broad comedy, which also took hits for Latifah's stereotypical urban character, but audiences ate it up to the tune of $136 million at the box office. Latifah regained the respect of critics with her 2004 release The Dana Owens Album," a further musical departure and Grammy-winning success (in the Jazz category) that proudly showcased Latifah's powerful vocals on a selection of soul and jazz standards.

On the big screen, Latifah still gravitated towards outrageous, broad comedies for the young African-American demographic, taking on a small but scene-stealing role in "Barbershop 2: Back In Business" (2004), which led to her leading role in the female-centric spin-off, "Beauty Shop" (2005). Increasing her involvement in film production through Flavor Unit's film house, she co-wrote, co-produced and co-starred as an overzealous security guard in the uninspired comedy "The Cookout" (2004). With "Last Holiday" (2006), she found a role much better suited to her onscreen charms, starring as a timid, conservative woman with three weeks to live who embarks on a international fling in an attempt to live her last days to the fullest. Now the voice of Pizza Hut commercials, Latifah also voiced Ellie the woolly mammoth in the animated hit "Ice Age: The Meltdown" (2006), before a refreshingly subtle turn as the no-nonsense literary assistant to a best-selling author (Emma Thompson) in the surreal "Stranger Than Fiction" (2006). That year, she became the first hip-hop artist honored with a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame.

Continuing a run of more sophisticated fare, Latifah enthralled audiences and critics with her measured turn as an AIDS-afflicted activist and recovering drug addict struggling to raise her teenage daughter in "Life Support" (HBO, 2007). For her role, Latifah earned her first Emmy nomination as well as a Golden Globe win for Best Supporting Actress in a Miniseries or TV Movie in early 2008. In a heralded return to big screen musicals, she was outrageously entertaining as the warmhearted and lavishly-coiffed record shop owner Motormouth Maybelle in "Hairspray" (2007). That same year the tireless entertainer released another record of her own, Trav'lin' Light, a vocal winner that picked up where The Dana Owens Album left off, hitting No. 1 on the Billboard jazz charts. In 2008, Latifah continued to knock out the comedies she excelled at, starring on the big screen alongside unlikely co-stars Diane Keaton and Katie Holmes in the heist comedy "Mad Money" (2008). Though critically reviled, the Queen was cited as the best thing in the film.

In October 2008, Latifah made a surprise appearance on "Saturday Night Live" (NBC, 1975- ), giving a dead-on impression of PBS's Gwen Ifill, moderator of the 2008 Vice Presidential Debate between Senator Joe Biden (Jason Sudeikis) and Governor Sarah Palin (Tina Fey). Back in the feature world, Latifah starred in "The Secret Life of Bees" (2008), playing one of three beekeeping sisters who take in a 14-year-old runaway (Dakota Fanning) and show her a world she has never seen. Latifah returned to her R&B roots for her seventh studio album, Persona, in addition to more vocal work reprising the voice of Ellie for "Ice Age: Dawn of the Dinosaurs" (2009). She continued her focus on film acting when she joined the all-star ensemble cast of director Garry Marshallâ¿¿s romantic comedy "Valentineâ¿¿s Day" (2010), then played a fast-talking, enthusiastic auto industry exec in the Vince Vaughn/Kevin James comedy "The Dilemma" (2011). Latifah utilized her impressive vocal ability in a starring role opposite Dolly Parton as one of two strong-willed women struggling to save a small town choir in the inspirational comedy-drama "Joyful Noise" (2012). After returning to voice the role of Ellie in the latest installment of the hit animated film franchise, "Ice Age: Continental Drift" (2012), Latifah joined the ensemble cast for a made-for-TV remake of "Steel Magnolias" (Lifetime, 2012). A surprise to many, it was playwright Robert Harling who first suggested filming an adaptation of his original stage drama with an all-African-American cast that, in addition to Latifah, included such notable actresses as Alfre Woodard and Phylicia Rashad. With both Latifah and Woodard receiving high praise for their performances in the tear-jerking drama, "Steel Magnolias" scored a ratings hit for Lifetime. Following a supporting role in the thriller "House of Bodies" (2014), Latifah returned to television in the biopic "Bessie" (HBO 2015), playing pioneering blues legend Bessie Smith. Her sensitive portrayal won an Emmy for Outstanding Lead Actress in a Miniseries or a Movie.

Award. Unfortunately, as Latifah reached new heights in the entertainment business, her personal life began to suffer from the pressure and from personal tragedy. In 1992, Latifah's brother was killed in a motorcycle accident and the traumatic loss threw her off her secure footing. She admitted to a period of depression that was evident on the deeply emotional Black Reign, which included a tribute to her fallen brother. Then in 1995, Latifah and a friend were carjacked in New York City and her passenger barely escaped with his life. The following year, she was given two years parole for carrying an unlicensed handgun and marijuana in her car. Months later, she was in trouble for assaulting a paparazzi. Ever the smart businesswoman, she embraced her run of legal infractions by playing one of a crew of women bank robbers in the acclaimed drama "Set It Off" (1996). The following year marked the end of "Living Single" and Latifah returned to the recording studio, emerging with her fourth album Order in the Court (1998), which was the first release to embrace Latifah's singing voice. More R&B oriented than her previous efforts, the album featured collaborations with Jill Scott, Faith Evans and Pras.

At the height of the celeb-helmed daytime talk show wars, Latifah was granted her own outlet with "The Queen Latifah Show," which stood slightly apart from the pack as "Dear Abby for the hip-hop generation." The syndicated show did moderately well but did not survive the waning popularity of the genre and was cancelled in 2001. Meanwhile, Latifah resumed acting with supporting roles in the sci-fi thriller "Sphere" (1998) and the romantic comedy "Living Out Loud" (1998), which earned her a Best Actress nomination at the Image Awards. She was nominated again for her solid performance as the caregiver of quadriplegic detective Denzel Washington in the drama "The Bone Collector" (1999). Latifah released a bestselling memoir Ladies First: Revelations of a Strong Woman in 1999, returned to the small screen with a recurring guest role on "Spin City" (ABC, 1996-2002), and conquered yet more territory as the new spokesmodel for CoverGirl cosmetics. In much the same way the fearless Latifah had pushed the boundaries of women in hip-hop, she again challenged the media's restrictive notions of traditional beauty as the face of CoverGirl and through her partnership with the Curvation lingerie line.

Latifah's career hit a major turning point in 2002 when she beat out such vets as Bette Midler and Liza Minnelli for the role of Mama Morton in the dazzling film adaptation of the hit musical "Chicago" (2002). Her performance showcased the range and depth of her talents in a way previous roles had only hinted at, with her compelling charisma and formidable vocal abilities proving that she had rare superstar qualities that could equally wow mainstream audiences and critics ali

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Filmographyclose complete filmography

CAST: (feature film)

1.
 Ice Age 5 (2016)
2.
 Barbershop 3 (2016)
3.
4.
5.
 Wiz Live!, The (2015)
6.
 House of Bodies (2014)
8.
 Steel Magnolias (2012)
9.
 Joyful Noise (2012)
10.
 Dilemma, The (2011)
VIEW THE FULL FILMOGRAPHY

Milestones close milestones

1990:
Made her TV debut on "Time Warner Presents the Earth Day Special" (ABC)
1991:
Made first series guest spot on "The Fresh Prince of Bel-Air" (NBC)
1991:
Scored first major supporting role in "House Party 2"
1997:
Profiled on "Intimate Portrait" (Lifetime)
2000:
Hosted the syndicated talk show "Queen Latifah"
2001:
Landed recurring role as a psychic on the ABC sitcom "Spin City"
2002:
Appeared in the CBS miniseries "Living With the Dead" about real-life psychic detective James Van Praagh
2002:
Cast in a supporting role in "Brown Sugar" opposite Taye Diggs and Sanaa Lathan
2003:
Co-starred with Steve Martin in the comedy "Bringing Down the House"
2003:
Partnered with Curvations, a lingerie line that applauded women with curves and confidence; also appeared as the face and body behind the new line of intimate apparel
2003:
Received Grammy nomination for Best Female Rap Solo Performance for the song "Go Head"
2004:
Received a Grammy nomination for Best Jazz Vocal Album for <i>The Dana Owens Album</i>
2006:
Co-starred as Emma Thompson's stern assisstant in the Marc Forster comedy "Stranger Than Fiction"
2007:
Cast as Motormouth Maybelle in the big screen version of the Tony-winning Broadway musical "Hairspray"
2008:
Co-starred with Diane Keaton and Katie Holmes in "Mad Money"
2009:
Played the wife of a woolly mammoth (voiced by Ray Romano) in the animated film "Ice Age: Dawn of the Dinosaurs"
2010:
Joined an ensemble cast for the Garry Marshall directed ensemble feature "Valentine's Day"
2011:
Played a supporting role in "The Dilemma," directed by Ron Howard
2012:
Co-starred with Dolly Parton as choir singers in the musical comedy "Joyful Noise"
2012:
Reprised voice role of Ellie, a female woolly mammoth in "Ice Age: Continental Drift"
2014:
Co-starred in thriller "House of Bodies" opposite Terrence Howard and Peter Fonda
2015:
Played the title character in "The Wiz Live!"
2016:
Appeared in "Ice Age: The Great Egg-Scape"
VIEW ALL MILESTONES

Education

Manhattan Community College: New York , New York -
Frank H Morrell High School: Irvington , New Jersey - 1987

Notes

In addition to her acting roles, Queen Latifah's music has been heard in the films "New Jack City" and "Straight Out of Brooklyn" (both 1991), "White Men Can't Jump" and "Class Act" (both 1992), and "The Associate" (1996).

"A lot of the roles I've been given have been me cursing somebody out, but that's not how I am. I don't just yell at people for no reason. And I WON'T be stereotyped."---Queen Latifah in ENTERTAINMENT WEEKLY, September 17, 1993.

"Part of the credit for Latifah's speedy rise in the music industry involves her membership in a loose collective of rappers known as the Native Tongues Posse. As constituents of the Native Tongues, De La Soul, A Tribe Called Quest, the Jungle Brothers and Monie Love emphasized Afrocentric clothing, a playful, abstract, lyrical style of rapping and vague, idealistic spirituality."---NEW YORK NEWSDAY, February 20, 1994.

"This film business is a challenge to me. I want to be De Niro. I want to be Pacino and Foster and Hanks, but black. And I've got to put in work to do that ... There's always gonna be another wall to climb over, kick down, bust through or blow away. As long as life keeps going there and changing, I'll never give it less than 100 percent."---Queen Latifah in LOS ANGELES TIMES, November 4, 1996.

"I'm not into all that Hollywood bullshit. I don't need to have the fastest car. I don't need to have the fifty thousand diamonds on my hand. Give me a bank account, gimme real estate, gimme companies, gimme shit that's gonna continue on past your broken-down Benz that you can't afford to keep. I love some of those things, but I'm not gonna be the one wearing what everybody else is wearing... I refuse to be like everybody else. I'm different. I'm the Queen, you know? That's what set me up from the beginning. I didn't want to wear gold chains and call myself MC Latifah. I threw a crown on. I took my little promo money and bought me a couple of outfits and had an African suit made with a crown and people noticed me because I wasn't looking like everybody else."---Queen Latifah quoted in INTERVIEW, November 1996.

"My mom and God are my influences. God keeps me on track because he knows I'm human and that I'll make mistakes. I want to get into heaven, so you'll never find me sinning too much. But in life I try to be brave and take charge."---Queen Latifah to Jeanne Wolf in "Queen Latifah's Latest Crown", THE BIZ, October 1996.

"I'm married to myself. I just felt it was time to take care of me, pamper myself. And when I meet the right man who can treat me as well as I treat myself, I will take this ring off and replace it with his."---Queen Latifah commenting on the platinum band on her left hand, as quoted in DAILY NEWS, November 3, 1996.

As of January 1994, Latifah is chief executive officer of Flavor Unit, a management and production company whose clients include Naughty by Nature, Fu-Schnickens, Apache and Nikki D. The firm is run by Latifah's mother and has 10 full-time employees.

"I believe that you've got to have fun doing what you're doing. When it's not fun, it starts to feel like work and I don't like working, I never really have. [laughs] As long as I can have fun, I'm happy."---Queen Latifah quoted to Venue, February 2003.

"My mama always said that I would marry an older man because that's who can handle me."---Queen Latifah quoted to Ebony, April 2003.

"I know who I am. I'm a young African-American woman. And that has a meaning. I do have responsibility to my people. And I do have a responsibility as a woman. But what that is is up to me, not anybody else. I don't put people in a box, and I never wanted to be put in one myself."---Queen Latifah to Premiere, October 2004.

Family close complete family listing

father:
Lancelot H Owens. Former policeman. Separated from Rita Owens when Latifah was nine years old; trained Latifah and brother Lance in karate and use of guns.
mother:
Rita Owens. High school art teacher, executive. Born in 1949; once ran a jazz and poetry club in Newark, New Jersey; senior vice president of Flavor Unit, Latifah's recording label, talent management and video production company, based in Jersey City, New Jersey.
brother:
Lancelot H Owens Jr. Policeman. Born c. 1969; killed in an off-duty motorcycle accident 1992; "Winky's Theme" was dedicated to him on Latifah's album "Black Reign".

Bibliography close complete biography

"Ladies First: Revelations From a Strong Woman" William Morrow

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