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Tom Hollander

Tom Hollander

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Also Known As: Thomas Anthony Hollander Died:
Born: August 25, 1967 Cause of Death:
Birth Place: Bristol, England, GB Profession: actor

Biography CLOSE THE FULL BIOGRAPHY

While best known for his prolific stage work, the somewhat diminutive British actor Tom Hollander has also offered memorable supporting turns in film and on television. Possessing a sort of angelic quality that adds the dimension of spoiled innocence to his often sinister or nasty roles, the actor made a memorable film debut in 1996's "Some Mother's Son," portraying a cold and contemptible Thatcherite in this fact-based tale about the hunger strike protest launched by IRA prisoners in troubled Northern Ireland. That same year, he was featured in the more lighthearted "True Blue," another true story, this about a 1987 Oxford University boat race. After gracing the small screen as Saffron's insufferably controlling fiancé Paolo in the 1997 TV-movie "Absolutely Fabulous: The Last Shout" (BBC and Comedy Central), Hollander went on to deliver another enjoyable scene-stealing turn as a flamboyant gay man carrying on a strange, secret affair with a real estate agent in Rose Troche's "Bedrooms and Hallways" (1998). A small independent film, it played the festival circuit but failed to find much support in its theatrical release, doing little to raise the actor's profile despite his outstanding work....

While best known for his prolific stage work, the somewhat diminutive British actor Tom Hollander has also offered memorable supporting turns in film and on television. Possessing a sort of angelic quality that adds the dimension of spoiled innocence to his often sinister or nasty roles, the actor made a memorable film debut in 1996's "Some Mother's Son," portraying a cold and contemptible Thatcherite in this fact-based tale about the hunger strike protest launched by IRA prisoners in troubled Northern Ireland. That same year, he was featured in the more lighthearted "True Blue," another true story, this about a 1987 Oxford University boat race. After gracing the small screen as Saffron's insufferably controlling fiancé Paolo in the 1997 TV-movie "Absolutely Fabulous: The Last Shout" (BBC and Comedy Central), Hollander went on to deliver another enjoyable scene-stealing turn as a flamboyant gay man carrying on a strange, secret affair with a real estate agent in Rose Troche's "Bedrooms and Hallways" (1998). A small independent film, it played the festival circuit but failed to find much support in its theatrical release, doing little to raise the actor's profile despite his outstanding work. Similarly, the romantic comedy "Martha - Meet Frank, Daniel & Laurence" (1998, released in the USA as "The Very Thought of You" in 1999) proved a moderate success in his homeland but was quickly relegated to the video shelves in America. Still, Hollander acquitted himself as another larger-than-life character, the wealthy music executive Daniel. He followed with yet another strong supporting role in Ben Elton's "Maybe Baby" (lensed 1999), starring Hugh Laurie and Joely Richardson as a screenwriter and his wife attempting to conceive.

A contemporary of Sam Mendes at Cambridge University, Hollander worked with the famed theater director at the groundbreaking Donmar Warehouse. His notable stage credits have included an appearance in "The Threepenny Opera", and starring turns in Almeida productions of "Tartuffe" (1996) and "The Government Inspector" (1997). Jez Butterworth's play "Mojo" added yet another baby-faced psychopath to the actor's resume. Critics were divided over Hollander's interpretation of Lord Alfred Douglas in David Hare's controversial portrait of the betrayal of Oscar Wilde, "The Judas Kiss" (1998). Originating the part at the Almeida opposite Liam Neeson, he found the requisite arrogance in the role but many British reviewers felt he lacked the necessary charm. Broadway audiences and critics, however, were less harsh in their evaluation, recognizing that the cherubic actor was adding yet another monster to his gallery of stage roles. Back in the feature world, Hollander had a supporting role in the period comedy, "The Clandestine Marriage" (1999), then played a homosexual restaurant owner who begins a romance with a high-spirited young woman after losing his male lover in the British comedy, "The Lawless Heart" (2001).

In Robert Altman's ensemble comedy of upstairs meets downstairs wrapped in a murder mystery, "Gosford Park" (2001), Hollander was on the list of suspects at a British country estate accused of murdering the manor's patriarch during a weekend of hunting. After a supporting role in "Enigma" (2001), a rather dull period thriller about the cryptologists of Britain's Bletchley Park who crack the Nazi enigma code, he played Mr. Mantalini in a small screen rendition of Charles Dickens' "Nicholas Nickleby" (Bravo, 2001). An appearance in Neil LaBute's uneven period romance "Possession" (2002) was followed by the made-for-TV movie, "Cambridge Spies" (BBC Television, 2003), in which Hollander played Guy Burgess, one of four Cambridge students sent by MI5 to the Soviet Union during World War II as spies to fight the Nazis, only to emerge decades later as loyal Communists. In Masterpiece Theatre's "The Lost Prince" (BBC, 2004), he played the absentee King George V whose son, Prince John, was never a contender to the throne because of epilepsy.

Following a small role in Richard Eyre's "Stage Beauty" (2004), a period comedy about King Charles II's decision to allow women to perform onstage in 17th-century England, thus putting a former leading lady (Billy Crudup) out of work, Hollander played a tabloid photographer in the cartoonish revenge thriller, "Paparazzi" (2004). He returned to period romance with the critically acclaimed adaptation of Jane Austen's "Pride and Prejudice" (2005), giving a subtly comic performance as dull vicar William Collins, whose betrothal to Charlotte Lucas (Claudie Blakely) comes as a shock to her best friend, Lizzy Bennet (Keira Knightley). In 2006, Hollander landed his first role in a major Hollywood production, playing the scheming antagonist Cutler Beckett in "Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Man's Chest" and its follow-up, "Pirates of the Caribbean: At World's End" (2007). After a key part in the decades-spanning espionage miniseries "The Company" (TNT, 2007), he appeared in "Elizabeth: The Golden Age" (2007), and stayed in a historical vein as King George III in an episode of the lauded miniseries "John Adams" (HBO, 2008).

Hollander took on a more substantial role in the barbed political comedy "In the Loop" (2009), and portrayed 19th-century writer John Ruskin in the British drama series "Desperate Romantics" (BBC Two, 2009). In 2010, he took up the lead on the sitcom "Rev." (BBC Two, 2010- ), starring as Reverend Adam Smallbone, a rural vicar who gets relocated to inner-city London. As co-creator of the series, Hollander was pleased to see the show, also featuring Olivia Colman, find an audience and continue on to subsequent seasons. When not working on "Rev.," he turned up briefly in the tense thriller "Hanna" (2011) and had a supporting part in the English romantic comedy "About Time" (2013).

VIEW THE FULL BIOGRAPHY

Filmographyclose complete filmography

CAST: (feature film)

1.
2.
 About Time (2013)
3.
4.
 Hanna (2011)
5.
 Soloist, The (2009)
6.
 In the Loop (2009)
7.
 Valkyrie (2008)
10.
 Good Year, A (2006)
VIEW THE FULL FILMOGRAPHY

Milestones close milestones

:
As a youngster was a chorister in Oxford
:
While at Cambridge, met Sam Mendes
1994:
After failing to secure a place in drama school, accepted Mendes' offer to appear in "The Threepenny Opera" at the Donmar Warehouse
1995:
Starred in Jez Butterworth's London stage production "Mojo"
1996:
Played "Tartuffe" at London's Almeida Theatre
1996:
Had a significant supporting role as a Thatcherite in "Some Mother's Son", set against the backdrop of the Troubles in Northern Ireland
1996:
Appeared in the fact-based Oxford University boat race adventure film "True Blue"
1997:
Was featured as Saffron's fiance Paolo in the TV-movie "Absolutely Fabulous: The Last Shout" (BBC in Great Britain; Comedy Central in USA)
1997:
Starred on stage at London's Almeida in "The Government Inspector"
1998:
Appeared alongside Rufus Sewell and Joseph Fiennes in the romantic comedy "Martha - Meet Frank, Daniel & Laurence"; released to less than stellar box office in the USA under the title "The Very Thought of You" in 1999
1998:
Portrayed Lord Alfred Douglas opposite Liam Neeson's Oscar Wilde in David Hare's "The Judas Kiss", at the Donmar Playhouse in London and later on Broadway
1998:
Gave a scene-stealing turn as a colorful gay man in an odd relationship with a realtor in Rose Troche's "Bedrooms and Hallways"; shown on the festival circuit before being released theatrically in 1999
2000:
Acted in Ben Elton's "Maybe Baby", the story of a screenwriter and his wife and their trials while trying to conceive a child
2001:
Co-starred in "The Lawless Heart"; screened at Locarno Film Festival
2001:
Starred on stage in Moliere's "Don Juan" at the Sheffield Theatre
2001:
Cast as a penniless former military man in the ensemble film "Gosford Park", directed by Robert Altman
2004:
Cast in "Paparazzi" about a celebrity who turns the tables on a persistent photographer; produced by Mel Gibson
2004:
Starred opposite Claire Danes and Billy Crudup in "Stage Beauty" based on the play by Jeffrey Hatcher
2005:
Cast in "Pride & Prejudice" opposite Keira Knighley
2006:
Cast in the sequel "Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Man's Chest," as Lord Cutler Beckett
2006:
Played a scheming real estate broker in Ridley Scott's "A Good Year" opposite Russell Crowe
2007:
Reprised role of Lord Cutler Beckett in "Pirates of the Caribbean: At World's End"
2009:
Featured in the acclaimed comedy "In the Loop"
2010:
Co-created and starred in the sitcom "Rev."
2013:
Appeared in Richard Curtis' "About Time"
VIEW ALL MILESTONES

Education

University of Cambridge: Cambridge , England -

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