skip navigation
Lionel Richie

Lionel Richie

| VIEW ALL

TCM Messageboards
Post your comments here
ADD YOUR COMMENT>

share:

TCM Archive Materials VIEW ALL ARCHIVES (0)

Recent DVDs

 
 

The Preacher's... "A True Crowd-Pleaser!" -New York Daily NewsStarring Academy Award® winner... more info $6.25was $6.25 Buy Now

Also Known As: Lionel Brockman Ritchie Jr. Died:
Born: June 20, 1949 Cause of Death:
Birth Place: Tuskegee, Alabama, USA Profession: Music ...
RATE AND COMMENT

BIOGRAPHY

With a string of chart-topping singles and award-winning albums, Lionel Richie was the 1980s ultimate balladeer. He launched his career as the singer and saxophone player of the funk-soul group the Commodores, which helped redefine the Motown sound with its anthem "Brick House" (1977) and the easy-listening classic "Three Times a Lady" (1978), among several other hits. Following his contentious departure from the Commodores, Richie transitioned to a successful solo performer with the release of his Grammy Award-winning album Can't Slow Down (1983). The album included some of Richie's signature hits, from the upbeat party track "All Night Long (All Night)," to the heartfelt ballad "Hello." An acclaimed songwriter, Richie collaborated with Michael Jackson and Quincy Jones in producing the 1985 charity single "We Are the World," one of the biggest selling singles in the history of recorded music. However, his personal life played out much differently than his love songs. In 1988, Richie's estranged wife was arrested for brutally attacking him after she caught the singer in a hotel room with his lover. Despite all the controversy surrounding his failed marriage - to say nothing of the storms he weathered from his adopted daughter, Nicole Richie - the singer continued to make music throughout the '90s and 2000s, maintaining a strong presence in the music industry, and solidifying his status as one of the more respected vocalists and songwriters of his generation.

Please support TCMDB by adding to this information.

Click here to contribute